Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It doesn't look like Pine. It doesn't look like it was planed very deep. It appears that there is some finish on the board.







.
No finish, just came off the planer. Surface was a dark grey weathered look before planing. Will try to cut the end off one and get a picture of the end grain later. Planed from 1" to 3/4"+.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quick shot of the end grain - cut off with planer blade, hit the right end with a little sandpaper. Not real smooth, will get picture of it well sanded later.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
These were boards pulled out of the cellar of a 100+ year old house - no idea how long they had been there. they were stacked up for shelving, but not nailed or screwed down. Thought they were all pine, 4 out of the 5 were different, the last was pine. They were all a dark grey before planing. Currently stored in the garage workshop awaiting a project that needs some pretty grained wood (and warm weather). :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Found this on google, called cypress picklewood. Lapped siding. Looks close, but I'm not an expert by any means.

100 years ago you said, do cypress trees even grow in your area? It was probably local would be my guess.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Lumber Plywood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
either one of those is probably more likely than cypress. Which trees are more prevalent in the area you found them?
Pennsylvania is (was) pretty well blessed with a plethora of different wood, including cypress, ash, oak, walnut, cherry, and until the blight hit, chestnut and elm. Forestry dept says 162 native species.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top