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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've stripped a hard maple washstand and dresser. The pieces were (from what I can tell) previously stripped then painted, stripped then poly'd then I stripped. They wanted them darker so thought I'd go with an aniline/water dye. Don't have much experience with aniline dyes.

As you can see in the pics, the crevices that I couldn't remove the old finish (paint) are causing some ugly spots.
I highly doubt that I will ever be able to get these areas to accept the dye.

Any ideas how I can cover these up? Or treat them to take the dye?

Some things I've tried - scrubbing with dye and steel wool, scrubbing with a brass wire brush and dye, mixed dye/water/alcohol.

Was planning on finishing with lacquer, but am flexible.
 

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For some of the smaller white marks, go to a big box or a real paint store and buy a Minwax Wood Finish Stain Marker. It's a sort of "Magic Marker" but it contains stain. There are a number of colors and by applying one over another you can vary and match colors. Have an artist's small brush that you can use to blend in the colors.

These are used by most furniture deliverymen to hide dings in furniture they deliver. I've be using them for years to repair dings and scratches.

For the larger white cloudy spots, have you tried using a gel stain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Howard.
I mixed up some gel stain and got a pretty good match. Used a small brush to get it into the crevices.
We'll see how it holds up in morning.

Didn't think of layering the stain markers though. Do you think they'd take to the paint? Regular oil stain didn't touch it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, C'Man. I've been trying to pick away at it, but man, some of that just doesn't budge. The panels seem locked in there with paint and possibly glue.
I'm liking the idea of paint match. A sample pot would do

I sold this fellow a lowboy dresser that I refinished, lucky me, he liked it so much he shows up with these.
Really didn't want this job, but it's for his daughter and it has been in their family for a very long time and best of all, he's not in a hurry!
He's shown up once a week since I've had it asking "is it done yet? No rush"
 

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How did you strip the piece and what was the temperature at the time? You should have been able to get all of the paint off of it using a methylene chloride remover. Any remover doesn't do well below 70 degrees so it's real important to use remover in warm weather. Also stripping paint it helps a lot to use a power washer that the pressure is below 1500 psi to rinse it off. The power washer will lift what stubborn paint off that you could otherwise not be able to get. This is how professional refinishers strip furniture. It does no damage to the furniture. I think touch up markers are a little thin to cover white paint. If you are going to finish over it I would mix some tinting color with some sanding sealer and paint the streaks with a small artist brush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Steve,
I used DS Super Remover which does contain, but not exclusively methylene chloride & can only assume it would've been over 70 degrees, but don't remember the exact temp. It was the first time I've used this brand for stripping and it is water soluble.

Like the idea of the pressure washer. Next time, that's what I'll be using. Surely it will do a better job with less effort.
I'll give the sanding sealer mix a try, or perhaps tint some grain filler.
 
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