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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building an Adirondack chair similar to the one found here. I have a table saw I am using to try to make some rip cuts on the 7 pieces for the back. I'm using 1x4 stock and want to make the piece just SLIGHTLY tapered so that they are narrower near the bottom and wider at the top to give the back of the chair a bit of a fan kind of look.

The problem is that the pieces are about 30" long and the table saw I'm using isn't deep enough to use the miter gauge. When I extend the miter gauge all the way toward me there's only about 20" of clearance between the gauge and the near side of the blade.

How can I make this rip cut with what I've got?

Thanks!
 

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Old School
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Cut yourself a tapered spacer to fit flat on the saw and to the edge of the fence. Run the stock through so the waste piece is to the left of the blade (if your setup is with the fence to the right of the blade). Make sure you secure the spacer to the saw top so it won't shift.

Another way to cut your taper is to draw lines on the stock and tack a wider board to it so the edge of the board is right on the line. If you pre-size that board in advance, your saw fence distance will be the same as your spacer board. For example: If the widest part of the slat is 6", set your fence to a greater dimension, like 8". Then draw on the slat the angle line. Tack the 8" board right on that line. Run through the saw. If you are concerned about the tack holes, you can use hot glue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So basically I'm creating a home-made fence that sits at the angle I want? Could I take a scrap piece and just clamp it to the table at the angle and distance I want? The only problem I see with that is rubbing wood on wood won't be as smooth as the aluminum fence.
 

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Generally the base f the back is narrower than the top of the back. This gives you the fan look without tapering the back slats.
 

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So basically I'm creating a home-made fence that sits at the angle I want? Could I take a scrap piece and just clamp it to the table at the angle and distance I want? The only problem I see with that is rubbing wood on wood won't be as smooth as the aluminum fence.
No you are not and until you understand the use of the table saw a little better you had better cut the end off the power cord before you seriously hurt yourself. The fact that you would even consider using the miter guage for a 30" angled cut tells me that you need some one on one instruction from someone who knows the use of this tool. I AM NOT KIDDING AROUND!!!! You are going to hurt yourself. Back away from the tool.

ED
 

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mateo,

With your level of experience i would avoid shop made taper cutting jigs for now, except for possibly using a scissor jig which is simple to make and relatively safe. But you can also buy them premade for a reasonable bit of coin.

I am using the word scissor loosely because I don't know if they have an actual name but it is simply two straight edges, sometimes wood sometimes aluminum, approximately 1" x 2" in dimension, that pivot on one end, and have a locking device so you can secure the angle you want, and you use it between the piece you want to cut, and the fence (the fence that came with your saw which is parallel to your blade). You also want to make sure the jig has a means to secure the work piece to itself so you are not trying to hold the jig, the piece, and run it all through at the same time. This is real important.

You can cut angles with shop made fences or jury rigged fences clamped on you table at an angle if you know how and understand the dynamics at play, but like edp, i am no fan at all of this type of procedure. If you do it the wrong way, and there is more than one "wrong way", you will pinch the piece and the blade will throw it hard enough to maim, or even kill you if you take a projectile in the throat and it opens you up in the juglar.

Another safe method to cutting tapered legs is using a sled which locks the leg in place but runs, again parallel, to the fence.
 

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If you google "Tapering Jig" you come up with several 100 pictures of the scissor jig mentioned above. ( I can't figure out how to paste pictures in here) The problem is you have an extra thing to juggle when cutting. Its very easy to concentrate on holding onto the tapering jig and forget (ooops) to hold onto the workpiece. Also if you don't have a stable outfeed setup the whole mess will dump over the back of the saw and of course your frist reaction is to jump after it. The preference would be to have a jig that the work clamps into so your holding onto 1 thing not 2. (a sled) I've not seen one premade before.

If you decide to go with a tapering jig just be very careful.

Alternatively you can clamp a straight edge on the piece and use a circular saw - this would allow any angle you want. You could run a router with a straight bearing bit along a clamped straight edge too.
 

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mateo,
. . . . . You also want to make sure the jig has a means to secure the work piece to itself so you are not trying to hold the jig, the piece, and run it all through at the same time. This is real important. . . . .
Jack you are right on it. It would be a juggling act without a way to have the jig and the piece connected as one, which is why I stressed that detail.

. . . Alternatively you can clamp a straight edge on the piece and use a circular saw - this would allow any angle you want. You could run a router with a straight bearing bit along a clamped straight edge too.
This is as good an option as anything mentioned really. Especially for the tools he has and the safety cushion needed.
 

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Can do with a router,straight edge clamped to line,and either a bottom bearing trim bit or top bearing template bit. Sounds a safer way to go,based on your input :yes:. A simple jig with a couple of DeStaco clamps and you are golden,safe, plus the benefit of a nice finished edge,all 10 fingers and blood still contained within the body:laughing:
JackM
 
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