Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi - I'm refinishing a dining room set that appears to be Oak and stained a mid brown (honey) color. If I want to refinish this in a darker color, what do I need to do to the wood first? Do I need to stand/stip the old stain off or since the new color is darker, can I use a stripping brush to prep the wood and then apply the stain?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,214 Posts
Hi - I'm refinishing a dining room set that appears to be Oak and stained a mid brown (honey) color. If I want to refinish this in a darker color, what do I need to do to the wood first? Do I need to stand/stip the old stain off or since the new color is darker, can I use a stripping brush to prep the wood and then apply the stain?

Thanks!
If the dining room set is in good condition and you just want to make it a little darker, you can adjust the color with an aniline dye. The problem is if you go very much darker it will get a painted look laying dyes or pigments on the surface. The furniture would have to first be cleaned with a wax and grease remover and scuff sanded. The dye would be sprayed on in light coats at low pressure and then finished with an oil based polyurethane. If it is a modern piece you might be able to topcoat with a lacquer but some testing would have to be done to make sure the existing finish is compatable. The solvents in lacquer can lift an oil based finish.

If it were me I would take the old finish off and start over fresh. I use Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover. A brass stripping brush would be good to get into cracks and crevaces. I normally let the remover set for about 15 to 20 minutes keeping it wet with remover and then brush it and use a broad knife on flat surfaces to remove the finish. Just let the stripper do the work. If you start scraping it off and it doesn't come off easy, let it soak longer. Don't do too much at once. Once you start scraping it evaporates quick and you have to get the residue off before the finish dries back on. I normally use a 1500 psi power washer to clean the residue off. It cleans the wood better than anything else you could use. If that isn't an option you can wash the residue off with lacquer thinner.

Once stripped just sand it and stain it as if it were a new piece of furniture. I prefer Wood Clasics stain from Sherwin Williams and their interior oil based polyurethane or cab-acrylic lacquer.
 

·
Wood Snob
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
I'm with Steve on this one. If you don't have an old piece you want to restore. Best off if you get to the bottom of it. This will or may give you the opportunity to improve the piece.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
576 Posts
"Easy question"??

There seem to be a lot of what ifs. The current finish material is critical. It could be lacquer or poly or a varnish . The best result would probably to strip and start over.
Most dark finishes in oak are applied to the bare wood and leave dark pigment in the open pores. Dark dyes work best on bare wood.
You can use a glaze which is a pigment or dye in a top clear layer or several layers.. Usually this give small and subtle changes in tone or density of colour.
Pigment finishes can and will give the painted look mentioned as they generally use opaque pigment particles to impart their darkening.
There are several inexpensive and good books on finishing.
Trial and error on an area can be useful.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top