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I finished this recently for my wife. Ambrosia maple, walnut, and red heart wedges. Mortise and tenon joints for the walnut feet. I used Rubio's Monocoat with C2 for the finish. If you follow their directions, it's easy to apply and works well.
Mike Hawkins
 

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Really like your table. Quite creative. I've thought about trying resin but have never done so. Seems above my skill level. Now I suppose I'll have to rethink that. Your pictures & wood selection are great.
 
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yes !! very nicely done !!
(I see we have the same "Wood is Good" mallet. (I think that is the one that gave me carpal tunnel).
do you see another table in the near future ?

there are so many members that want to learn how to pour a river table.
yours would be great for the beginner. simple design but very dramatic when finished.
where will it go in the home ?

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Thanks guys,
I'll try an answer your questions. Timewise, hard to say. It was a few hours this day, few hours the next. Suffice to say probably about 20-30 hours at least. But I will say when I'm in my shop, I'm never in a hurry. I made a form out of some 3/4" furniture grade plywood I had. I covered the inside with Tyvek housewrap tape to seal everything. Then I set the slab pieces in, after debar kin god the edges and getting rid of any soft areas. I used Wisebond Deep Pour epoxy, available on Amazon. It's about $100/gallon. I used 3 1/2 gallons for this. It is easy to work with as long as you follow the directions. I use mica powders for the color, also available on Amazon. There's a couple different blues, a green, and the White comes from a powder called ghost white and another called white diamond. It takes about three days for the epoxy to harden up. After stripping it from the forms, I built a router sled out of 2 x 4's and some garage door angle iron. I bought an 1 1/2" planing router bit and surfaced the top and bottom. Then the edges were trimmed on the table saw. After that sanding with a random orbital sander. The wood I stopped at 320, the epoxy 3000. The legs and walnut pices came from rough sawn stock I had in the shop. Once everything was routed, sanded and dry fit, I applied the finish. It's sitting in my living room next to a loveseat. Working with the epoxy is fun, but can be a little stressful. When you start mixing it up, there's no turning back. You do have plenty of time to mix it and pour it. For the first couple hours, you have to babysit it and watch for any bubbles. I didn't get too many, and you just pass a bernzamatic torch over them and they disappear. The peoplè that make epoxy tables to sell usually have more machinery in their shop geared for production. I've seen shops with CNC equipment just for this purpose. These kind of projects I normally don't sell because of the time involved and that fact that I justin like them too much when they're done to turn them loose. If you decide to try something like this, just search "epoxy river table" on YouTube. There are a lot of good videos on their.
Mike Hawkins
 

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yes !! very nicely done !!
(I see we have the same "Wood is Good" mallet. (I think that is the one that gave me carpal tunnel).
do you see another table in the near future ?
.
John,
I bought that mallet sometime around 1980. It's has been indestructible. If I had penny for every tap that mallet has done I don't be pretty wealthy.😁 I'll do some more epoxy projects in the future. Just have to get some more ideas.
Mike Hawkins
 

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Working with the epoxy is fun, but can be a little stressful. When you start mixing it up, there's no turning back.
Amen to the "no turning back" aspect of epoxy -- because that's pretty much the drill regardless of application. But if you've done your research and prep, and you certainly did, the results can be quite stunning. Excelente.
 

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Mike - that is when I bought mine. and it is TRULY indestructible !! (maybe we should give it a free plug).
They are still being sold. I have seen them in woodworking stores (e.g., Rockler and Woodcraft) as well as online. The outer layer starts out very green, not the brown shown in John Smith's mallet photo.

I resisted buying one because I always thought that I should make my own. Now that I see that real woodworkers like Mike and John use them (and like them!), I will reconsider. :)
 

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T/A = it's not that we just like them. they have proven themselves to be
worthy adversaries to the solid wood mallets, of which I have several.
it is like a big dead-blow hammer with the urethane head.
when I first got mine, I was using big gouges taking out big chunks
of wood on a regular basis. like Mike said, they have hit something hard
for thousands and thousands of times and the urethane does not have
a nick it. unlike dead-blow hammers, the plastic ends have to be changed
pretty often, depending on its use.
I don't know how much they cost in 1980. but if I lost this one, I would get
another one just like it.
(I think mine has always been brown - I don't remember it ever being green).
also - it is 20oz. and fits my little girly hand quite well.

John

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Mike, great explanation of the materials prep & work need to complete such a beautiful project. I wouldn't sell it either. Too pretty, and the craftsmanship is exceptional.
 
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