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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a picture of two unknown exotic woods that I would like to know the name of. The one on the left is zebrona.
I know ebony and many other exotic woods and know most of the western US species and have them. Can anyone identify the two species on the right?
 

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The center one might be bubinga...and when I zoomed in on the boards, I got them mixed up, so I corrected my second post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes I do remember bubinga as wood Nate got but I don't think any are mahogany. We had mahogany on our sail boat and know about it. Will try to get better pictures but will be working for next 4 days. Thanks for the the bubinga.
 

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Yes I do remember bubinga as wood Nate got but I don't think any are mahogany. We had mahogany on our sail boat and know about it. Will try to get better pictures but will be working for next 4 days. Thanks for the the bubinga.
Spanish cedar and sapele are also in the mahogany family.
 

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Good clear images of the grain patterns and end grain could help to properly identify.

Middle could be Bubinga, but there's dozens of other woods it could be too.

Several different color changes make me thing the right board could be Canarywood which can range from yellows to oranges, to browns & reds and the boards I have tend to show 4 - 6 different colors at the same time after fresh sanding, but again there's dozens of other candidates as well....

EDIT: If the right board is Canarywood, it will have a distinct earthy smell when cutting / sanding, sort of reminds me of freshly dug up carrots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Good clear images of the grain patterns and end grain could help to properly identify.

Middle could be Bubinga, but there's dozens of other woods it could be too.

Several different color changes make me thing the right board could be Canarywood which can range from yellows to oranges, to browns & reds and the boards I have tend to show 4 - 6 different colors at the same time after fresh sanding, but again there's dozens of other candidates as well....

EDIT: If the right board is Canarywood, it will have a distinct earthy smell when cutting / sanding, sort of reminds me of freshly dug up carrots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes I remember that Nate said it was Bubinga. Thanks I finally know what most of the exotic wood is. Now I need to measure the boards of each species but will wait until it warms up here.
 

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If you have any quantity of bubinga and padauk, look after them. They are very valuable woods by themselves and bubinga has now been put on the endangered species list making international shipping of it very difficult if not impossible , so that will hike the price considerably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This wood and the ebony was brought into the country many years ago. It was found in an old Tacoma warehouse. I was on the west coast but moved back home to SD. Nobody here knows, or understands their worth, I don't have have a way to get the value. All web sites have little pieces. Yes I have I will get the board foot after I get coal to keep me warm. Some boards are over 8' and all are over 4" wide.
 
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