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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I was a little shy about joining a woodworking forum because I find men in their 40s and 50s mostly take up the craft. But I do love the craft and I am a beginner.

I was wondering if anyone has advice for a beginner? I haven't made any projects yet. But I would first like to get a set of Woodworking Projects with comprehenisve step by step plans and blueprints. I find plans with DIY woodworking kits very confusing and hard to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow. What a beautiful piece of woodwork! As a beginner -
can you or someone explain the difference between woodworking plans and woodworking blueprints? Also, are "designs" the same as plans?
 

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Welcome Aboard
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow. Thanks for all these replies. Hi. I'm very new to the hobby of woodworking. Can someone explain the difference between woodworking plans and woodworking blueprints? Also, are "designs" the same as plans?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Hopefully some gals will respond .....

There have been a few in the past, they are not active as far as I know, but here's a general answer to your general question regarding advice.
There are a few ways to learn and they can all be combined, forums like this, books and magazines like Popular Woodworking, Wood etc., videos like those on You Tube, Fine Woodworking DVDs etc. and finally, first hand experience with a mentor or a class. The fastest and easiest is online. Taking what you learn and then starting a project will get you going better than any other way... just try to do it and you will run into issues, have questions and can post them here.

We have people here who can saw lumber from a fallen tree, mill that lumber into flat and straight boards, machine the joints or cut them by hand, and turn it all into fine cabinetry, cases, tables, boxes or chests, or using a lathe make beautiful turnings. A few here make musical instruments as well.

Depending on your specific interest ...projects to sell, for home decoration, home improvements, fine furniture you will find support here.

Finishing is the final step in the process and one that gets the least or last attention it seems. It's part art, part chemistry and a part past experience applied to the present project. Paints, stains, clear coats, sealers, 2 part finishes, epoxies, are different and requuire a different approach. We have some real finishing experts here who will give you great advice when the time comes for that. My advice is to practice using the intended material, stain and finish until it is second nature to you. There will be no last minute surprises that way.
Welcome. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Woodenthings. Thanks so much! Can you explain/define for me the difference between woodworking designs vs. woodworking plans. And what exactly are woodworking blueprints?
 

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I am considering buying a "comprehensive" DIY woodworking plans and blueprints online and I need to know the difference.
Welcome to the forum. :thumbsup:

Blue prints are usually for construction of houses etc.

Plans and designs may be similar but in my opinion plans would be detailed drawings and directions for woodworking projects such as jewelry boxes, benches, tables and chairs etc.

Designs I think of as more of a art thing. However they may be similar to less detailed plans.

You say your a newbie but can you give a little more detail. Types of tools you have or have experience with? What type of wood working are you interested in? Etc.
 

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OK, I'll try

Designs are include the basic idea, the proportions, dimensions, materials, colors, finish, from a rough sketch or Sketch Up program.

Woodworking plans are like Norm Abrams says ....a dimensioned or measured drawing. In the center of Wood magazine you'll find plans for the featured project. Very few woodworking projects aside from architectural or production facilities use blue prints.
Some of us here us NO plans, just a rough sketch with some dimensions. Some times the length of the plank we start with determine the long dimensions of the project. It's hard to stretch wood. :yes:
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Welcome to the forum. :thumbsup:

Blue prints are usually for construction of houses etc.

Plans and designs may be similar but in my opinion plans would be detailed drawings and directions for woodworking projects such as jewelry boxes, benches, tables and chairs etc.

Designs I think of as more of a art thing. However they may be similar to less detailed plans.

You say your a newbie but can you give a little more detail. Types of tools you have or have experience with? What type of wood working are you interested in? Etc.
Thanks so much for this informative response. I am literally a beginner. I've been reading woodworking magazines for the past several years. I haven't purchased any tools or anything yet because I didn't want to hop in and get the wrong things - and waste money. So I figured I'd read a lot first, get on forums like this, ask questions, find out where to get comprehensive plans and designs and THEN buy my tools and materials.

I LOVE crafting smaller ornate objects like the "Welcome" sign someone sent me when I joined (I'm sorry I'm typing so I can't look at your name without getting off this post); train cars and butterflies (see attached) and less ornate objects like boomerangs, spice racks, birdhouses,
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Welcome to the forum. :thumbsup:

Blue prints are usually for construction of houses etc.

Plans and designs may be similar but in my opinion plans would be detailed drawings and directions for woodworking projects such as jewelry boxes, benches, tables and chairs etc.

Designs I think of as more of a art thing. However they may be similar to less detailed plans.

You say your a newbie but can you give a little more detail. Types of tools you have or have experience with? What type of wood working are you interested in? Etc.

Thanks for the distinction. So something like an AutoCAD would be used to create blue prints for things like houses, facilities - correct? And blueprints pertain to houses or any kind of building - right?

So for my first project, do you think I should start with the butterfly I attached as a picture (it's very ornate) or something much simpler?
 

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I LOVE crafting smaller ornate objects like the "Welcome" sign someone sent me when I joined (I'm sorry I'm typing so I can't look at your name without getting off this post); train cars and butterflies (see attached) and less ornate objects like boomerangs, spice racks, birdhouses,
Here's my opinion regarding the different types of woodworking which covers a range of activities.

Crafting is the beginning where a lot of folks start out. Simple hand or power tools, maybe a jigsaw or small bandsaw or scrollsaw.

DIY projects moves up in scale and require larger tools and equipment. Generally a circular saw, miter saw or job site table saw is used.

General woodworking is the creation of basic shapes, usually rectangular, with simple joints, butts, laps, dados etc. The use of hand tools or power tools including a table saw, jointer and planer.
A large finishing sander like a dual drum or wide belt while expensive, can be a part of the basic or advanced woodworkers tools.

Fine woodworking gets into advanced joinery, mortise and tenon, dovetails, bent laminations for curves, inlays, veneering etc.
 
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