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Discussion Starter #1
First of all Happy Thanksgiving to you and your families!

Now here is my potential issue. I recently bought a used Craftsman Belt Driven TS with a Vega Fence off of Craigslist for $125 (Model# 113.2990240). I am new to wood working and after debating between getting a new Dewalt Portable Saw ($300) and a used TS for $125 (again with a Vega Fence!) It seemed like the smart thing to do especially since I am just starting out.

I know a used saw from the 70s was going to have some issues but this is what I have encountered within the first week.

1. I noticed my blade has a slight wobble when I manually spin it. I replaced the blade but it still wobbles. I checked the inner collar attached to the arbor and it has a oh so slight runout on about 1/5 of the surface. I read a post on how to fix it with a grinding stone.
2. It makes a noise when the blade spins, I THINK it's the bearings which I think could be a big deal but I don't know
3. I am having a hard time tilting the blade past 15 degrees. It is very tough to turn but I think its just rust cause I had the same issue raising the blade but after scrubbing the raising thread it's running a lot smoother.
4. I literally turned her on for the first time 30 minutes ago and she was humming but then started making a weird noise. I thought something was wrong with the blade and quickly unplugged it....the inner belt wheel where the belt rides on started coming off!! I put it back on and tightened it but who know what would have happened if I didn't cut power when I did.
5. The base is not super solid so I either will have to reinforce it, buy a new one or build a new one.

Additionally over the course of this week I had to spend an extra $65 for a OEM blade guard off of eBay, $35 for a new blade and another $20 on lubricants/rust removal/Paste wax.

Here is where I need to know if I am overreacting cause when I saw that belt wheel hanging I said to myself "I am stripper her down and selling her for parts!" I know getting an used TS was going to have it's issues but are these normal issues that if I ultimately work through will get me a solid TS or do I have a potential money pit on my hands?

Thanks in advance.
 

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where's my table saw?
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when buying used

You can either "run watcha brung" OR strip her down and look her over. I would take it all apart, taking photos as you go and replace the arbor bearings for sure. Then look at the arbor pulley/wheel as you call it and make sure it's tight on the keyway and the set screw works snuggly. the whole arbor is part of the carriage and will come apart. Time to clean all the threads with a small rope or paracord to get the gunk out and then spray them with Dri Slide.

Look at the power cords, plug and switch and blow out the motor and switch box. Dust is your worst enemy. When you reassemble the carriage back into the cabinet using the 4 bolts and lock washers, make certain the blade ends up parallel to the miter slots. With the saw on it's back on the bench, you can reach the bolts AND measure to the slot with a tr-square. It's way easier than working upside down from the bottom DAMHIKT :laughing:

The arbor bearings are the only parts that will wear out and are cheap to buy on EBay. Look for the numbers on the races, 6202rs, :blink: with a 5/8" bore.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Arbor-Beari...807?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item338503c4c7
 

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The Old Fisherman
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305 Posts
NY

Sorry I can't give you any guidance concerning your TS. I feel for your predicament. Unfortunately it is the risk we take when we buy tools used. So far I have been fortunate with my purchases. No doubt I will not always be so lucky. But if you decide to part it out let me know. I may be interested in some pieces. Certainly I may be interested in the fence system. Good luck. Hope it works out for you either way.

Rob
 

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With the belt off, spin the blade and arbor. If it doesn't feel smooth, the bearings need replacing. Not much $ and not that bad of a job.

Pulleys can loosen up. Remove the pulley and check, that the key is still on the shaft, and the shaft isn't chewed up. Check the pulley and be sure the hub isn't cracked, by a set screw. If it's an aluminum pulley, think about replacing it with a machined pulley. It will run smoother.
Be sure to check motor pulley also.

I would have got the saw running and made sure it was a keeper, before buying a guard. Actually wouldn't have bought the guard at all. But that's another story.

Good luck with it. You should be happy with it after new arbor bearings, and maybe a pulley or 2.
 

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First thing to do is to remove the wings and unbolt it from the base, turn saw upside down and lay it back on the base. Now you can see what you are doing while you clean and repair the under parts of the saw.

New bearings are not that expensive, this is how I changed them out in a similar saw;
http://benchnotes.com/ArborBearings/arborbearing.html
 

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(clever wood pun here)
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979 Posts
You're getting great advice here. If you have the time, it is totally worthwhile to spend time cleaning, tuning, and tightening EVERY bolt so that you truly know what you've got. This will give you piece of mind about your saw while also helping to get you acquainted with it. There are very few moving parts on these old Emerson built saws, so no problem can be too complex. Also, parts and knowledge are plentiful since everyone and their mom has owned one.

For the base not being stable, definitely start by tightening all of the bolts. These bases are made from about 8 pieces of steel bolted together so that they pack away well when boxed new. Consequentially, there are a whole bunch of small bolts that all need to be solid. If you snug all of them up and it still isn't as stable as you'd like, adding some thin paneling between the legs as a brace can do a lot for the rigidity of the base, while also passively collecting some of the dust that falls downward. I have a similar saw and just use the base as is with no real complaints. :thumbsup:

Woodnthings' idea about tipping the saw to align it is a smart one if you have the space. I've only done it with the saw upright and a really long socket extension--which worked well for me, but it probably wasn't the most ergonomic way to do it.

Keep us posted on your progress rehabbing this old saw!
 

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Chairman of the 'Board
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285 Posts
When you go through an old tool and refurbish it, you accomplish a few things.

  • Replace cheap components with quality
  • Learn your tool inside and out
  • Eliminate runout and fully true the tool
  • Make it "your" tool
The sacrifice here is time and money. There are some tools worth that to me but most are not. I own a Ryobi TS but am looking for an older replacement, one that I can refurbish to my specifications. Mine is nigh on to perfect, but I don't like table. Too gimmicky and I bought it new.
 

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No Longer Here, BY CHOICE
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I have almost the exact same saw. 113.299040. I scored mine on CL for $50. My top needs some love, the fence needs replaced and it too was missing the splitter/guard assembly. My plan is to take the whole thing apart, litterally strip it down. Clean every part. Ive recently discovered electrolysis!! Put it back togetgher with new bearings, they are cheap. New link belt. Scrap the stamped metal wings and put the saw into a surround or cabinet rather than back on that flimsy stand it comes on. Oh and I need to replace the cord on mine also and I will install a large paddle on/off switch from Grizzly. Add a Delta T2 and it should last me a long long time. When its all said and done, Ill essentially have a brand new saw for about $300 not including the surround.

My point for explaining what I intend to do is to say, I dont think you should scrap the saw. You got a great deal and its worth fixing it up. When your all done, your still gonna be under the cost of a new saw and with the exception of a riving knife, youll have a saw thats just as good or better than a similar new saw. Buying used tools can be a gamble but Ive had really good luck buying old Craftsman tools!

If you think you have a bearing problem, that very well could be your blade issue. Id definately check every thing else before I started trying to flatten the collar on a grinding stone. If you dont want to disassemble the entire saw, Id still get under there with some cleaner and a stiff brush and try and get everything as clean as possible. Remember to lube everything up after you clean it. Good luck!
 

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I wish I had that fence NY. You got a nice deal. Tune it up! Make sure its a oiled and wd40 away. Maybe the bearings need changed but I wouldn't part it out because of that. A little tlc will go a long way on that saw.

It won't be hard to get your money back if you aren't happy. You buy that dewalt in a few years you will be thinking about that craftsman I bet.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone. I between this thread and a few PMs I got my stress level has dropped. :) I will go through the process of taking her apart, clean and grease the gears, replace the bearings, pulley and belt then see where I am at. As of now I plan on doing it the week in between Xmas and New Years. I will document everything, take some a bunch of photos and share.
 
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