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Discussion Starter #1
I was cutting dados in some red oak for glass and I smelled something burning. I thought it was odd that that I would be burning wood because I just replaced my TS blade. And then I saw the smoke pouring out my plug. By the time I reached down to unplug it was spitting out sparks and burning my carpet. The plug was so hot that it was just starting to melt. Not only that but the smoke has cause my some breathing discomfort even now almost 20 minutes later. I can still smell the melting plug.:icon_rolleyes:


 

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Sawdust Creator
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Fire extinguisher and smoke detector in your shop? If not already.....you should make sure you pick some up. Glad it wasn't worse.

I had the same thing happen last year with Christmas lights......
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a couple of fire extinguishers, but I’m just in shock that this happened because it’s supposed to be a heavy-duty 12 gauge extension cord. :eek:
I m going to cut the whole 3 plug end off and connect up a metal box with two 20 amp duplex receptacles. I was always short a plug anyway with only 3 plugs.

Anyway when it rains it pours. I ran another cord so I could finish my cuts and my belt pulley suddenly fell off the motor. I can’t find the pulley key and I ran a large magnet through the sawdust, but it didn’t show up. I guess this is a sign to stop for the night. I want to replace the TS cord plug anyway.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Johhnie if it weren't 4 U this would be a dull forum

You have the best/worst luck of any one here. Thanks for the post. :thumbsup:
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Sleeper said:
I m going to cut the whole 3 plug end off and connect up a metal box with two 20 amp duplex receptacles.
If you do this, please do not use one of the standard utilities or wall boxes. They are only UL listed and certified for use when they are mounted to a solid surface like a wall or ceiling. About the only 4x style designed for use with cord is one of these. I think your issue may also be overload because with (4) 20 amp outlets, you may overload that 12 gauge cord.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you do this, please do not use one of the standard utilities or wall boxes. They are only UL listed and certified for use when they are mounted to a solid surface like a wall or ceiling. About the only 4x style designed for use with cord is one of these. I think your issue may also be overload because with (4) 20 amp outlets, you may overload that 12 gauge cord.
Thanks Mark for your advice, but I don’t take much concern over UL. I’ve been an electrician for over 35 years and I know that just because it’s not UL approved does not mean that it failed. It just means that the manufacture didn’t pay for the testing. Besides, the cord I used was UL approved and look at what happened there. A good receptacle connected up properly in a steel box is much more dependable than a molded plug and they have been used like that for many years.
As far as overload, I know all about overloads because that’s my job. You don’t have an overloaded plug unless all three plugs are in operation at the same time and if the cord is rated at 20 amps while plugged into a 20 amp circuit, the circuit breaker will trip first. I have three pieces of equipment plugged in all the time, but I’m only using one at a time, so unless the motor freezes up there is no overload.
 

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Sometimes there is a higher power telling you to take some time off :)

I always try to be careful with cords and plugs on the floor. It's too easy for them to get smashed or crushed.
 

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Chairman of the 'Board
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Listen to your spidey sense. It's not that things are going wrong for "no apparent reason": it's that you don't see or understand the reasons. My second rule of diving applies to all areas of my life: You can call a dive at any time, for any reason, with no questions asked and no repercussions. To call a dive means to formally end it, usually giving the thumbs up (ascend) signal. I don't work or dive when I am getting flustered by small stuff. Sure, I can work through some of it, but there comes a time to do what you did: call the work for the night. Things that were nigh on to impossible might be easy peasy in the morning.
 

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Reminder that I need to get an extinguisher in the garage. Glad you caught it early enough. My wife complains about smells enough as it is, she'd kill me if a fire got in the house haha
 

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Discussion Starter #11
LOL, well not the "whole" shop.

Wait a minute.
You got carpet in your shop??:eek:
I just have a 5’wide runner from my house to my workbench so my feet don’t get cold when I’m in my bare feet. When I’m actually working I have my shoes on, but sometimes I just want to do something at my little workbench. They were replacing the carpet at work and I asked for a small piece for my Van but ended up getting rid of it a month later so the carpet went in my shop instead. :laughing:
 

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I keep a 2 1/2 gallon pressurized water can in the shop. I am always welding and cutting so I get nervous about fire. It ia the same thing that we use with the fire dept, you can literally put out a small room and contents fire with one.....works very well, trust me.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I keep a 2 1/2 gallon pressurized water can in the shop. I am always welding and cutting so I get nervous about fire. It ia the same thing that we use with the fire dept, you can literally put out a small room and contents fire with one.....works very well, trust me.
I’ve seen those water pressure extinguishers and I probably should get one of those in the wood shop. I have a 10lb bottle of Halon for electrical fires and a 45Lb bottle of CO2 for when I’m working on the cars. I also have a dry chemical ABC fire extinguisher at the door for my all around extinguisher.

The Halon is pretty old and hasn’t been checked in years, but the pressure gauge is still registering full and until now I’ve never had a electrical fire. Except for this one extension cord which was supposed to be rated Heavy duty, I don’t leave extension cords plug in.

I also do some welding but I do it outside. I did do a little mig welding in my wood shop in the garage a few weeks ago and I was pretty worried about it and I cleaned everything up pretty good before and after.

This is my outdoor welding shop. I have my large welders inside with cable run through the wall to the outside bench.

 

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After years in the navy, and seeing the lowest bidder's electrical runs, I'm always nervous about electrical fires. For any equipment that I can't hold in my hand, I plug into a pigtail with built in circuit breaker.

image-2685292300.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
After years in the navy, and seeing the lowest bidder's electrical runs, I'm always nervous about electrical fires. For any equipment that I can't hold in my hand, I plug into a pigtail with built in circuit breaker.

View attachment 83274
Wow, is that a circuit breaker or a GFI? I would not mind having an in-line circuit breaker. GFI is OK but only opens if there is a short between conductors or ground and not an overload. Arc flash protection would really be cool for the problem I had because the GFI did not trip, but I don’t know if Arc flash is available in cords yet.
 

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Sleeper said:
Wow, is that a circuit breaker or a GFI? I would not mind having an in-line circuit breaker. GFI is OK but only opens if there is a short between conductors or ground and not an overload. Arc flash protection would really be cool for the problem I had because the GFI did not trip, but I don’t know if Arc flash is available in cords yet.
That's a great question. A friend of mine actually introduced me to these. He's an electrician, so I took his word that it would work. None of my stationary tools have tripped them...and I feel more safe...so it suites my needs. Lol
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Sleeper said:
Wow, is that a circuit breaker or a GFI? I would not mind having an in-line circuit breaker. GFI is OK but only opens if there is a short between conductors or ground and not an overload. Arc flash protection would really be cool for the problem I had because the GFI did not trip, but I don’t know if Arc flash is available in cords yet.
Looks like a standard GFCI. I have a couple, but don't use them as much as I probably should. In a standard GFCI, the micro switch will shut off if it detects a 5 milliamp difference in the in/out flow. GFCI's are designed to prevent damage to equipment.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That's a great question. A friend of mine actually introduced me to these. He's an electrician, so I took his word that it would work. None of my stationary tools have tripped them...and I feel more safe...so it suites my needs. Lol
Your post got me thinking about Arc Protection so Took a look at Homedepot to see how much they go for these days and I found one that will fit my box for under $40 so I'm going to buya couple for myshop to prevent this from happening again.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Q-Lin...er-THQL1120AFP2/100686307?N=bm16#.Uowi0if8vSc

They were pretty expensive when they first came out.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
GFCI's are designed to prevent damage to equipment.

Mark
Actually that's not true. GFCI are to prevent shock to people not equipment.
Surge protectors are designed to prevent damage to electronic equipment.
Circuit Breakers are to prevent Overload of equipment and protect the wring.
Arc Flash or Fault are to prevent sparks from causing fire
 
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