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Discussion Starter #1
I have no sanding equipmwnt at all. Not even a piece of sandpaper.

I am looking at different air sanders for a start.
I would like a 6" ROS Hook and Loop if possible.
I am figuring at $100 to $150

Who are the major players today? And which model would you recommend?
 

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first I would compare the amount of CFMs to operate the sanders.
then - is your compressor capable of running it for any extended period of time.
I had a JitterBug 1/4 sheet palm sander years ago just for wet sanding flat surfaces
and totally loved it. it's just a matter of personal choice between air and electric.

.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry, thought I listed the
5.1 CFM @ 90 PSI rating on my compressor.
I typed it up and guess I forgot to submit the editing,

I used to have an old Jitterbug from Harbor Freight and loved it I had a bigger compressor then.
I dont know why but I just like air over electric.

Things change over time. I was wondering which manufacturers are on top and who fell to the bottom
 

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You absolutely can't go wrong with hutchins air sanders. They're extremely balanced and long lasting. I have a background in auto body work where even the slightest ripple will show up in the finish the gold standard is Hutchins..
Some guys think their standards are lower, but that usually because the tools have changed over the years and most were used to the older heavier models and a bit touchier air valves..
 

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I have an Ingersol Rand 5" ROS. It came out of the trash when a production line was shut down. I like it a lot. The low profile of an air sander is much easier to control for fine finishing. That said, it is a gluten for air. A 5 hp compressor just keeps up with it at 90 psi. I just use it for final sanding of bare wood. I have a couple of older Milwaukee orbital sanders which are much more powerful and aggressive for material removal. I do must of my initial sanding on patterned veneered surfaces with them using 120 grit paper. These do leave swirl marks, which the ROS removes.
An air ROS just would not be what I'd get as my first sander, especially for working with solid wood rather than veneer, mainly because they use too much air to run for long. Wonderful finesse and smooth swirl free sanding, but less power than you would want for material removal.
 

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Aside from the compressor being larger ......

I have no sanding equipmwnt at all. Not even a piece of sandpaper.

I am looking at different air sanders for a start.
I would like a 6" ROS Hook and Loop if possible.
I am figuring at $100 to $150

Who are the major players today? And which model would you recommend?

Why do you think you need an air powered sander? :surprise2:

The variable speed electric sanders do a great job in my experience and I own 3 dual mode air sanders and a straight line type. My latest sander purchase was 3 Hyper Toughs from Walmart and I put 3 different grit papers on them so I don't need to change them for every different application. They were less than $50.00 for all three. If one goes out, no big deal. I have as many sanders as I have routers.

My largest electric is a 7" disc that will take down any lumps or ridges in a hurry. I have several hand held belt sanders, two 4" and one 3". With those and several power planes I can level out most surfaces easily.
The best half sheet sander that was ever made, is now discontinued from Milwaukee. You can use it all day long because it doesn't vibrate your arm off unlike the Craftsmans. I was told about it by a door maker who used it daily and he was correct. If you can find one these days they are around $200 to $300.
:vs_cool:
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I just like air sanders To me, they seem more comfortable in my hand. They seem to just glide like they are floating. Eventually, I will have both. Really, I was jusdt wondering who makes some of the better brands. I was always a Delta man for machinery. Now Delta table saws have a hard time making 3 star rating. Three stars are a failing grade - that's only 60%. For hand power tools, I always liked PC. I understand that now they have dropped their quality.
I always thought of Dewalt as sturdy as in if they fell out of your truck at 70 MPH, just dust it off and it will be fine. I looked at Dewalt as great for construction but no so miuch for fine woodworking. Times and things change.
 

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I have both air and electric sanders, and lately I have been grabbing the electric.

I will say, when it comes to taking off large amounts of material, I like the air sanders. But for the finish or light duty work, I'll take the electric.
 

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I've used both as well. And I disagree with you 100%....

If there's an electric sander In the larger shops it becomes the new door stop...
 

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I have both air and electric sanders, and lately I have been grabbing the electric.

I will say, when it comes to taking off large amounts of material, I like the air sanders. But for the finish or light duty work, I'll take the electric.
What compressor you running and how much consistant cfm?
 

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What compressor you running and how much consistant cfm?
I'm not sure of the CFM. It's a 5hp 220v Black Max (sanborne) with a 60 gal tank. I The air tools seem to work fine, but I just prefer the electric. Maybe I just don't have the best air tools.
 

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If the compressor isn't running 13cfm continuous it can't handle the air and won't run the sander correctly. Electric is probably your best bet..

I know of a lot of shops over the years that wish they could change to air but won't cough up the compressor money....

What kind of sander? Usually Dynabrade and Sioux sanders are good...
 

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Dust collection in home shops ...

For many years the air sanders had no means of dust collection. There's more importance to that these days. A home shop would be quickly filled with sanding dust from the old style air sanders, but there are improvements now:
https://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-...wopLkoK00Ca77OT471dpRbWAkQUnhADUaAtc2EALw_wcB


More expensive:
https://www.rshughes.com/p/3M-28509...F4GeQ-YUF5IsBLrmkfg8huP-4ZGbSXugaAsFHEALw_wcB


So, working in a confined space would be a real issue using the old style air sanders:
https://www.eastwood.com/rockwood-6...333FivKG-3rcILAIXRyDte9l-4ZRSbo0aAj4mEALw_wcB
 

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I'll start by saying you already have a sander. It's called your hand! In my work, I'm hand sanding probably 80% of the time.

IMO air sanders probably aren't a good first choice for a hobbyist shop. I would question whether 9CFM is adequate. Just my opinion based on listening to a 15CFM/80Gal compressor cycle. You can get models that have dust extraction built in, but as Rebel mentioned you still need dust collection now you have a heavy air hose + vacuum hose - kind of cumbersome.

As with any tool, start with the best you can afford. Do some research & you will quickly find there is a reason why there are $40 sanders and $400 sanders.

Personally I would recommend a Festool. I have the ETS 125. And there is no question it outperforms any standard sander I've ever owned. If the budget allows you can't go wrong.

I'll mention dust collection because it is so important with sanding. There are a couple basic ways to go: a downdraft table or direct collection.

There are a few ways to go: shop vacs or a dedicated dust extractors. There is a difference. For me a dust extractor is a better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I just bought a Dewalt electric sander with Hook and Loop paper. For 70 bucks, it will do. I am stiill looking for air sanders. The thing I noticed is that the less expensive air sanders all require more CFM than the more expensive models. Obviously, the less expensive ones are using way less expensive components.
This will get me through for a while till I decide on more sanders.
 

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Theres nothing electric that compares to air. Large companies have all air. And body shops all air..
Absolutely! There is not an electric sander on the planet that can touch a good quality air sander. It's not very recent, but in issue #74 of American Woodworker magazine, I wrote one of the rare "scientifically based" sander reviews that compared all electric sanders and several of the air sanders. The air sanders were so dominant that my editor forced me to pull them out of the article cuz they broke the curve, and our readers wanted electric.

I built a robotic sanding mechanism to remove the human factor from the tests, and measured removal rates with a laboratory scale, and finish quality by counting scratches with a low-power microscope. (Back then I was a certified microscopist for counting asbestos fibers in air samples, and used that methodology for scratches.)

Not a single electric sander was even close on the scratch counts to the pneumatics, and the only electric sander that could remove more material was Festool's Rotex sander, which isn't even an ROS.

My Dynabrade sanders are over 30 years old and still going strong.
 
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