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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm installing two side-by-side inset flatware drawers in a face frame cabinet and need to install the block out on the central 2" wide stile (I changed the drawer design from full overlay to inset). The slides are Blumotion Tandem and I have the depth-type adjusters.
I already installed the block out for the outside runners by using stacked cutoffs planed to the correct thickness and screwed to the cabinet sides so they are flush with the stiles.

The cabinet is already painted and the countertop is easily removable. I was thinking some sort of pockethole jig but I've hardly ever used pocket holes: I can count on one hand and can't remember any of the specific applications. I have a tiny wood jig basically a very small block of wood with angled hole drilled in it ... I have it somewhere. Never had any pockethole drill bit or screws just used standard screws and twist bit.

Anyway, suggestions on how to mount the block out?
Best to use two separate blocks for either side of the central still or one 2" wide block made of stacked wood?

Also, I'm shooting for 3/32" gap for the cabinet doors, ideally should the drawers gaps remain consistent with that dimension?


Note: the cabinet has a cutting board storage slot above the drawers. I may fabricate a spring loaded pull rod to fit into the cabinet (at the center stile) with a sort of 'hook' at the back to pull out the cutting board ... the black dot in the photo below shows the potential rod location ... so any block out needs to avoid interfering with this area.
Cabinet with hole for rod.jpg
IMG_20210506_141733290.jpg
 

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Smart and Cool
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I'm interpreting that you are running the "blockout" front to back? Or just adding some meat to the stile for the front screw in the slide?
 

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Termite
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Sorry was thinking something else..

I run it the full length of need. Xsometimes it assist in the door hinges...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm interpreting that you are running the "blockout" front to back? Or just adding some meat to the stile for the front screw in the slide?
Forgot to include that.
Old building, plaster on lath walls, built in cabinet.
I have a 1/4" thick plywood cleat (correct term?) running almost the width of the interior of the cabinet screwed to the wall. I have the Blum metal runner brackets (x4) screwed to the cleat.
[I originally had a 3/4" plywood cleat but changed the drawer design from full overlay to inset and interior cabinet depth was very tight to fit the slide, thus the thinner cleat].

The block outs will only be for mounting the front end of the runners; the rear will affix to the Blum brackets.

The block out for the sides I made about 6" tall by 3.5-4" wide.
I'm not sure how wide the block out needs to be (never done a block out before) so I perhaps made it wider than need be.

I suppose if they only need to be a couple inches in depth I could just basically screw through the blockout into the middle stile.
 

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Smart and Cool
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Forgot to include that.
Old building, plaster on lath walls, built in cabinet.
I have a 1/4" thick plywood cleat (correct term?) running almost the width of the interior of the cabinet screwed to the wall. I have the Blum metal runner brackets (x4) screwed to the cleat.
[I originally had a 3/4" plywood cleat but changed the drawer design from full overlay to inset and interior cabinet depth was very tight to fit the slide, thus the thinner cleat].

The block outs will only be for mounting the front end of the runners; the rear will affix to the Blum brackets.

The block out for the sides I made about 6" tall by 3.5-4" wide.
I'm not sure how wide the block out needs to be (never done a block out before) so I perhaps made it wider than need be.

I suppose if they only need to be a couple inches in depth I could just basically screw through the blockout into the middle stile.
I've always just nailed and glued those where I need them. You would certainly want to be conscious of your depth, you could poke a nail tip through the front if you aren't careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've always just nailed and glued those where I need them. You would certainly want to be conscious of your depth, you could poke a nail tip through the front if you aren't careful.
My finish nail gun is broken.
I thought the block out needed to go about 4" or deeper in into the cabinet to support the Blum hinges? Never done this before so I have no idea. If the block out is wide I won't be able to just screw straight through them.
 

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Smart and Cool
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My finish nail gun is broken.
I thought the block out needed to go about 4" or deeper in into the cabinet to support the Blum hinges? Never done this before so I have no idea. If the block out is wide I won't be able to just screw straight through them.
I guess I missed the hinges in your original post.

I've never dealt with the hinge dilemma, best to let the experts chime in on that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I guess I missed the hinges in your original post.

I've never dealt with the hinge dilemma, best to let the experts chime in on that one.
I never mentioned hinges and have no hinge question, so I'm not sure why the topic is being discussed here.
 

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Termite
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I never mentioned hinges and have no hinge question, so I'm not sure why the topic is being discussed here.
I Mentioned it because sometimes the strip goes all the way down and assists with the door as well.it relates to the drawer and door in some cases..

Sometimes...

That's what I get for trying to help..:poop:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I Mentioned it because sometimes the strip goes all the way down and assists with the door as well.

Sometimes...

That's what I get for trying to help..:poop:.

I see now.
Thanks for contributing Rebelwork ... your clarification puts it into context: I completely missed the connection to my inquiry.
It doesn't apply in this instance as the doors have classic butt hinges edge mounted to the stiles.
 

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A question usually leads to a second question and I jumped the gun and tried to cover both. My fault, plus I have a habit of explaining things like I'm talking to a guy in the cabinet shop...
 

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I'm installing two side-by-side inset flatware drawers in a face frame cabinet and need to install the block out on the central 2" wide stile (I changed the drawer design from full overlay to inset). The slides are Blumotion Tandem and I have the depth-type adjusters.
I already installed the block out for the outside runners by using stacked cutoffs planed to the correct thickness and screwed to the cabinet sides so they are flush with the stiles.

The cabinet is already painted and the countertop is easily removable. I was thinking some sort of pockethole jig but I've hardly ever used pocket holes: I can count on one hand and can't remember any of the specific applications. I have a tiny wood jig basically a very small block of wood with angled hole drilled in it ... I have it somewhere. Never had any pockethole drill bit or screws just used standard screws and twist bit.

Anyway, suggestions on how to mount the block out?
Best to use two separate blocks for either side of the central still or one 2" wide block made of stacked wood?

Also, I'm shooting for 3/32" gap for the cabinet doors, ideally should the drawers gaps remain consistent with that dimension?


Note: the cabinet has a cutting board storage slot above the drawers. I may fabricate a spring loaded pull rod to fit into the cabinet (at the center stile) with a sort of 'hook' at the back to pull out the cutting board ... the black dot in the photo below shows the potential rod location ... so any block out needs to avoid interfering with this area. View attachment 427283 View attachment 427284
Most of my cabs are inset doors with undermounts. Too late now, but I install aprons in dado slots 1/32 below the bottom edge of the drawer opening. Similar to mounting the floor of the cabinet. From there I can just sit the blockouts on top of the apron, glue and screw to the apron. In your case, I think I would either use pocket screws, or place a cleat on the mid rail to sit the blockout on. Of course you have to do this to the rear of the cab also. As for the thickness, if you use pocket screws it is likely easier if you use stock the full thickness of the stile. If you are going to rest it on cleats, it really would not matter.
 
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