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Hi All,

New to the forum - just joined to seek some advice.
I am not much a Do It Yourselfer when it comes to chores around the house - much more at home with computers and electronics.

However, I do enjoy learning new skills and hope that I can learn from the vast knowledge on this forum.

I have a solid wood dining table - not sure the type of wood - it's quite hard though. In the past I have used Tung Oil to protect it. Every couple years it starts to look "worn" and I need to re do it.

I bought from IKEA STOCKARYD Wood treatment oil, which is made of Tung Oil and Linseed Oil. STOCKARYD Wood treatment oil, indoor use - IKEA

I though it might have a faster drying time and perhaps wear better over time.

However, after a couple applications I find it's not drying as HARD as the Tung Oil - and it is also not covering up my poor sanding job - see the photos attached.
Table Property Furniture Light Wood


Brown Property Light Wood Interior design



I'm now ready to "re-do it" - but before doing so wanted to get some advice.

Should I invest in an orbital palm sander - sand down to the bare wood - and start with the Tung Oil again - or give this STOCKARYD another shot. I think it was my poor preparation and hand sanding that resulted in the streaky and uneven application of the STOCKARYD oil.

Thanks for your advice and reading this far!

Chris
 

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Yes, you do need to re-sand. I’m sure you’ll get a different opinion, but IMO you’re better off sanding by hand. If you use an orbital, research sandpaper b/c it makes all the difference. Removing swirls and pigtails may be harder than you think!

How did you apply the oil and exactly what is it? It says “main ingredients” are tung oil and boiled linseed oil. I‘m wondering if it is like Danish oil, which has varnish in it (and it’s Sweden, right?)

Either way, you need to start with a good surface prep to remove any excess residue or the sandpaper will gum up.

Buy some sheet paper (I like 3M garnet) I would start with 100 and stop at 180 if you’re using oil. There are people here who apparently know a lot more than me about finishing, but this is how I would do it. Save your money and use your elbows nothing is safer than hand sanding!
 

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Dr. Robert, Should he/she give it a wash of denatured alcohol before sanding? I worked on some Teak that was oiled many times over 40 years with "Teak oil" and everything gummed up but giving it a wash helped a lot. I think I used 50% H2O and 50% DA. Asking since refinishing isn't really in my bag of tricks.
 

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I say strip it down and use a hard finish like urethane or lacquer.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Sanding leaves either swirl marks or linear scratches depending on your method, ROS sander or by hand.
I would use a card scraper IF the oil finish is still not dry?
Wood has different level of porosity depending on the grain, so that accounts for the blotchy appearance.
Refinishing would be a last resort for me. I'd keep applying the STOCKYARD only you can be sure the previous coats have dried sufficiently.
You will need to reapply as many coats again if you strip off what's there now.
 

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As long as you continue with oil finishes, you will keep continuing with the oil finish - like in 'forever'. oil finishes are never 'done', they will always have to be maintained. If you enjoy that sort of thing, go for it. I'm just saying that if you want to be done with that table, oil is not the way to go.
Good luck in whatever you choose.
 
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