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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(First off - I tried a search and came up with nothing)

Anyone have tips for successful resawing? My first attempt did not go well. I have a Grizzly G0550 with a riser block and a Timberwolf 3/4" x 4 tpi blade. I ambitiously tried to resaw a 10" wide piece of 4/4 sycamore. The blade started wandering so I finished it by hand - what a lot of work! I realize now that I should have started with some narrower stock.

I looked at one Youtube video where they said to run a lower tension, that doing so would leave more horsepower available for cutting. I watched another where the guy said to add tension to the blade. Both make sense to me, but I think the higher tension is the way to go.

It would be great if those with experience would share any advice or tips on resawing.

Thanks!
 

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First double check the tuning of the bandsaw.

Re-sawing is not easy for me. I have seen videos where folks peel off veneer slices with ease, but I have not yet mastered this skill.

I watched the Alex Snodgrass video linked in this thread. I thought my saw was tuned, but I double checked and made some tweaks which helped.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/band-saw-blade-drifting-toward-fence-50167/

High or low tension may depend on the blade manufacturer. Timberwolf state their blades are designed for low tension. Other manufacturers state high tension.

I would not have started with a 10in deep piece.

Is the blade designed for re-sawing? You want fewer tpi, as in 2 - 3 tpi and deep gullets to take away all the waste. If there are too many tpi, the waste builds up and the blade will go all over the place.

Timberwolf and Highland Hardware both sell blades designed for re-sawing.
 

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where's my table saw?
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no resawing info? HUH?

It's almost the most frequently asked question regarding bandsaw issues.

Here's some tips:
Watch the Snodgrass Video on tuning the the machine, and you will have to remove the table so get ready...

A 10" resaw in any wood may be a challenge, I've done 8" on a 3 HP 18" Minmax with no drift.

A new, sharp blade with 3 TPI or fewer is best. You must increase the tension on wider blades to keep them stiff. A 3/4" blade needs a lot of tension over a 1/2" wide blade. I use both 3/4" and 1/2" with very little difference. The 3/4" goes on the big machine, the 1/2" goes on the 14" Craftsman. The blade should deflect about 1/8" when tapped on the side, with the guard up fully.

The face against the fence must be flat. The face on the table must be flat. The angle between them must be 90 degrees. A jointer is about the only way to insure flat faces and 10" jointers are not common. I always joint the last face on the resaw stock each time, to make certain I have a flat surface against the fence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey I'm just sayin - I used the red search bar above, typed in "resaw" and "resawing" and got zero results.

That said, thanks for the video you embedded and the other info. I checked my purchase history, the blade is 3 tpi. I spoke with the people at Suffolk machinery and this was the blade they recommended for resawing hard woods.

I agree, in retrospect, starting with a 10" board was a bad idea. :blink:

I like to think I am pretty good at tuning my saw, but blade tension is something I don't have a lot of experience with. I am going to add some tension and try again with a piece just 4" or 5" wide.

Thanks again.
 

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Hey I'm just sayin - I used the red search bar above, typed in "resaw" and "resawing" and got zero results.
I am not a fan of the site's Search feature. Far too often it refuses to include my keywords.

The site has a lot of useful threads over the years. I find searching via a search engine, Google, Bing, I use Ixquick will actually use the keywords you type.

Just type in the following - replace "your keywords" with any words you want to search

Host:Woodworkingtalk.com your keywords
 

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I have the Grizzly G0513 band saw with a two HP motor and has a max. cutting of 12 inches. Contrary to what most people recommend, I use a 1/4" wide blade with 6 TPI carbon steel blade. It works great for me. I think the narrower blade has much less friction or drag through the cut than wider ones. The blade also must be sharp for successful re-sawing.

I do not re-saw great quantities but I frequently re-saw all kinds of wood for various projects. It's a great way to stretch your lumber dollar.

Here are some tips that I use to make re-sawing easier:

On very hard or stubborn wood start by re-sawing from each side with a thin kerf blade on the table saw, especially with wider boards. On a 12" board I can cut three inches in from each edge with the TS and that only leaves me with 6" to cut with the bands saw.

Only re-saw as wide as you need.

Cut your boards to the shortest length you will need before re-sawing.

I sometimes use a long sliding tray that hooks over the fence which make it easier to feed longer boards through the saw.

I always use an out-feed table when re-sawing anything longer that about two feet.

Make sure to hook you BS up to a dust extractor which minimize the friction causing sawdust.

Best of luck, Bret
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tips, LR. I need to get a thin blade for my table saw. I fact, my table needs a new standard blade.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I think it's BWSmith who...

Uses a high pressure air blast at the saw kerf to blast away the saw dust. I've never tried it, but sounds like a good idea. It may also help cool the blade. hmmm, interesting idea.
 

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Some Things To Try

For now, stick with the same blade. I would keep the tension up. Make sure the upper guide is as low as you can get it to the stock. You didn't state what speed you're running. You might experiment with trying more/less blade speed.

You didn't state what type of fence you're using. If you have a long flat fence, experiment with a single point pivot type fence. When using a long flat fence there is the tendency to trust a straight guided cut without deference to drift. A drift can start and becomes too late before detected. With a single point of pivot, on some saws, with some woods, it's easier to follow a line while adjusting for any drift.

Some of the problems could be with operator control. You might be trying to feed too fast. Or, your handling of the stock may be too tense, causing inordinate movement through the cut. It becomes a matter of developing the feel, for the cut, and for the speed.






.
 

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This is one of those subjects that you're going to have to be creative in your research........

You go snag a brand new XYZ blade,recommended by manuf,confirmed by many on the net........Good to go,right?

You've got a brand new machine,it's all in VG alignment,no vibration to speak of......Got it.

And can go on&on.The deal is,to really "know" about blades you need to research sharpening them........has little to do with whether or not your blade is new/sharp/correct TPI...it has to do with understanding how the tooth impacts the wood,and then how the gullet works with the tooth for clearing chips.You'll also learn in your "how to sharpen" study on why blade speed works for and against certain tooth/gullet designs.

But,most just get on the net and buy whatever is being recomended........?As an example....I can take a brand new Timberwolf and ruin it within a cpl feet when new by not understanding whats going on.But take the same blade and either....treat it right during break-in,and/or have it go through a sharpening,and it will literally sail through stock.Shooting an air blast right down the cut....is a crutch.Well,call me "gimpy" 'cause,it works.

But again,it ain't as simple as what it appears to be....it gets a little too engineery for some folks on here so will leave it at that.One clue however is,you can "tune" the whine the air makes on the blade.....and see what it does to the cut.

The saw may be new......but if you're lumber wrestling?Point being,any movement that isn't put into performing the cut is wasted effort.And in the case of resawing that translates to drift,slow rate of speed,and just bad cuts.So step back and take a super critical look at your BS etiquette.This is why folks use powerfeeders.And no,am not saying go get one......but by studying how they function the "feeding" of stock you'll get a better appreciation of "why" they work.It means that the stock is being forced into submission......ain't no wrestlin goin on.

Expand your research into sawmills and their blade setups.Also look for the way they feed.Then carefully expand or borrow some of these ideas and enlist them in your resawing.Good luck and check back in when you get it straighten'd out(ha).
 

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I wanted to add some recent experience with my band saw.

As I have said, I like using a 1/4" 6 tpi blade because of the reduced drag. This works well for me in dry wood. However, recently I've tried cutting some small logs and or partially milled logs or cants of green walnut. The 1/4" blade did not work well for this. The green wood was heavy and was difficult to keep it tracking straight through the saw. I had a lot of blade distortion and crooked cuts.

I have a 3/4" blade with 3 tpi. I'll try that on the green wood and see if it works better.

Bret
 
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