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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the wife and I are nearing completion of renovation in our new (old) home. The contractor is pretty much done and now it is time for me to step in. Among the many projects left for yours truly to tackle, first on the list is pantry shelving. We didn't have a pantry before so converted the formal dining room into a pantry/laundry room/office.

The new pantry dimensions are 91"x 60". The door opens in to the left so I will be hanging 6 rows of 12" shleving along the right wall(91") and back wall(60"). My wife and I don't like the look of wire shelving, nor it's tendency to encourage things to tip over in the gaps, and I am dying to break out my table saw after months of storage.

I was planning on doing the standard 1x2 strips along the walls for the 3/4" plywood shelving to rest on with a 1x hardwood edging to cover the endgrain and also increase rigidity. However, that would still necessitate the use of brackets every 32" or so(studs are supposedly on 16's) to help prevent sagging. I was just going to build some wooden angle supports but the angled portion will cut into available space on the shelves below which we don't really want to do either.

I looked into metal support brackets but at 12" of depth, they come out to around $15/ea, and I am estimating I will need about 18 of them, not ideal.

I recently saw a small shelf supported with threaded black iron pipe secured to the wall with a floor flange and with a cap on the oppesite end. I have used this before when building a rolling clothes hanger for a freind and thought I might be able to get some 3/4" pipe and fittings for cheaper than the metal brackets I mentioned earlier.

My main question is whether y'all think those will be sufficient or if I need to just build the angled supports and be done with it. Photos attached.
 

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1948
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This angle brace (available from Home Depot) is 10" x 10" x 1.25" x 0.093" thick. It is almost certainly all you will need for support. It costs $6.21 each.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Crown-Bolt-10-in-Zinc-Plated-Corner-Brace-15085/202033947

You can buy one and test it.

A tidy way to do this is to slice through the drywall with a utility knife over the stud and mount the bracket directly on the stud. Then use drywall mud to back fill the gap. That way the upright section will be completely hidden.

The shelves I saw were two pieces of plywood glued together with slots to accommodate the corner brace. The shelf simply slid onto the corner braces and the brackets were completely hidden.

I have not used this techinque, but I saw the results from someone who had. The cleat would have to be added after the brackes were in place.
 

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1948
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Grainger sells 3/8" diameter drill rod (soft) which you can cut to length and use like over-long dowels to hold the shelves.

It is water hardened material so you can easily heat treat it with a torch to spring temper. About $15.00 for 36" lengths. These would be entirely hidden and you would get probably 6 pieces from each rod.

The hardest part will be edge drilling the 3/8" holes.

If you feel you need to harden the rods, you should also temper it afterwards so that it is not brittle.

You can also get these from Grainger through Amazon.com and if you are a prime member shipping is free.

Plain steel rod (galvanized) is $12.00 so not great deal compared to the drill rod.
 

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This bracket comes in a 10 pack for $49.99.



You do not have to have a 12" bracket for a 12" shelf. The $15 bracket that you referred to would be at the far upper end of shelf bracket prices.


To me the simplest method is to put a 1x12 at each end and run a rod in the center for support.


George
 

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1948
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Why don't you just put a floor to ceiling stile in the center of the 91" run?
Or an upright and use shorter shelves.

https://www.carolinacloset.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/B24-pantry_georgian-elm_-floor-mount.jpg

I'd be tempted to use the pre-drilled melamine covered uprights and melamine covered shelves for a enclosed pantry. They clean easily. It will go together lightning fast. And it is relatively inexpensive and looks tidy. The image above is made that way. I can only get white ones from the local big box stores. You might be able to special order woodgrain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, thanks everyone for all the responses. I'll run all by the boss and see what she likes. Will definitely post some after pics on here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
irbyka76

Or an upright and use shorter shelves.

https://www.carolinacloset.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/B24-pantry_georgian-elm_-floor-mount.jpg

I'd be tempted to use the pre-drilled melamine covered uprights and melamine covered shelves for a enclosed pantry. They clean easily. It will go together lightning fast. And it is relatively inexpensive and looks tidy. The image above is made that way. I can only get white ones from the local big box stores. You might be able to special order woodgrain.
Well Packard, now you have started something. Wife really likes the look of the meleamine setup in the link you provided.

I saw the pre-drilled 8' sections and shelf pieces at HD, but now I have another question. What is the standard method of attaching the pre-drilled uprights to the wall? Is the support of the shelves on either side of it enough to keep it from getting wonky? I don't like the idea of not anchoring them somehow.

Never really worked with the stuff that much so any advice is appreciated.
 

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pantry shelf loads can build up in a hurry. my wife has her pantry double stacked with can goods. i'd swear she's a prepper or had lived thru the great depression :wink:
failure of one shelf would cascade down to all shelves. if it were mine i'd build a carolinacloset style system, with full support down to the floor. keep all loads off the wall, other than to keep the shelf system on the wall. full face frame with fixed shelves would be easy to build in place. you could leave some shelves adjustable
 

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1948
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Well Packard, now you have started something. Wife really likes the look of the meleamine setup in the link you provided.

I saw the pre-drilled 8' sections and shelf pieces at HD, but now I have another question. What is the standard method of attaching the pre-drilled uprights to the wall? Is the support of the shelves on either side of it enough to keep it from getting wonky? I don't like the idea of not anchoring them somehow.

Never really worked with the stuff that much so any advice is appreciated.
I would build them as independent modules, with two uprights a bottom shelf, and toe kick, and a top shelf and middle shelf as fixed shelves attached with either Confirmat screws through the sides or with pocket hole screws. In my opinion the Confirmat screws are stronger, can be removed and replaced several times and offer the racking strength of dowels with the holding power of screws.

Kreg publishes plans for a bookcase and that it the constrution I would recommend minus the elaborate trim. I would probably leave off the back panel as the wall will act as a structural component. I would add a 4" wide strip of 3/4" material at the top using pocket holes from the rear. I would attache the modules to the walls using the top strip with two screws: https://www.kregtool.com/webres/Files/DIYPLAN7.pdf

According to sagulator, the 16" deep shelves on 30" wide supports with a 3/4" x 1½" front piece of red oak hardwood, will hold 40 pounds per foot, or 100 pounds per shelf.
 
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