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Hello woodworkers,

I am a journalist writing an article for a well known magazine regarding advice from fathers (It's a Father's Day-themed article)

So, I'm curious...Do you have any advice from your father you'd like to share? It should be in the vein of "How to...____", and be as specific as you can. Anything having to do with specific carpentry, home improvement, plumbing, etc. could be useful.

Post your responses here and I'll message you directly if I think your advice could be used. Thanks!
 

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I can't recall one single piece of advise from my dad, I learned by his example though. Working side byside with him for more than twenty years. I learned my work ethic how to troubleshoot problems, be a better man, patience, way too many things to list and so many that Icould not list, because they are such a part of me. Way better than a just a little advice now and then if you ask meal
 

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I wood if I could.
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I certainly learned a lot from my dad. But one nugget of wisdom I'll always remember concerns the shaking of dew off the lily. And not believing crap you hear in commercials.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Advice FROM a father ok?

I have a 17 yr old son and give him this advice occasionally:

Remember these 2 Laws, Murphy's and Gravity. Murphy is always waiting for the chance to muck something up and Gravity takes over from there. :yes:
For instance always lay the 6 ft heavy pry bar down on the ground. Do not lean it up against the wall unless it's in a corner and can't fall over. :blink:
 

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I too worked along side my dad doing any and everything he did. Once while slinging gravel on my grandmothers drive. I was 10 years old and helping the best I could when my dad told me "son, fill the back of the shovel, the front will take care of itself" I've never forgotten that. It doesn't matter if you are actually using a shovel or building a wall, the same applies.
 
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I've been given many tips and tricks from my dad over the years, and they've served me well. One thing that's always stuck in my mind was when he was teaching me to drive. I guess I was paying a little too much attention to the rear view, so he says "Don't worry about anyone but the guy behind the guy in front of you".
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Best advice my father gave me. " No matter how bad you screwed up, always tell me the truth and stay out of arms reach".
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Best advice my father ever gave me....

There isn't anything that I can remember. What I can remember is that I did the opposite of what ever he told me. :thumbdown:

There was one thing that he was right about. "If you're going to dishonor your name, do it for millions." I decided that even millions wasn't worth it.
 
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Stop and think.

My Dad was an engineer. We called him "Cheater Russell", because given a task to do he'd stop a minute and think about the easiest way to do it.

My favorite example is when I was 18, I owned an old sports car, and I needed to get the front brake calipers off to rebuild them. They were held on with 1/2-inch bolts with 5/8-inch heads, and were rusted in quite solidly. Because of where they were on the car it was impossible to get anything on the bolts to give you good leverage.

I spent all day Saturday, and well into the night, with out budging any of them. I tried everything, heat, penetrating oil, heating everything and putting dry ice on the bolt head. Nothing worked.

Sunday afternoon I was getting ready to go borrow a buddies oxy-acetelyne rig to burn the bolts out, when Dad asked me if I was giving up. I told him that I'd used up all my tricks.

He proceeded to go out in the shop and file down the bolt heads a little bit. He then drove an 11/32 socket on the bolt with a big ballpein hammer. He then placed a hydraulic jack under the end of a ratchet handle and jacked on the end of the ratchet until he lifted the car off the jack stand about half an inch. Then he pulled a step stool ever next to the car, and proceeded to jump from the ate stool to bumper of the car. When he landed on the bumper, there was a loud popping noise, as the bolt broke loose.

He looked at me and said, "I guess you can figure the rest of them out."
 

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When I was about eight years old, my Dad taught me to use a file on wood. He said apply pressure on the forward stroke and lift on the back stroke. Do not drag the file back. He taught me many other things but that is my earliest memory.
 
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