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Bah humbug
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Rick....my wheels fell off as soon as I left my shop..
 

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Sawing against the Wind
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And herein lies the root problem....no one read the question, including you. The original poster wasn't asking a code question. He was asking how many conductors the circuit would require. So you have nearly 80 postings giving advice for questions not asked. People are so busy running around shouting, "hey look at me, I know something" that they jump to their keyboard before they've even had the chance to digest what the person is asking about.

So going way back to the first few postings that already answered this, he needs to use 2 current carrying conductors plus a ground. And given the way his followup question was asked, no, he cannot reuse the 50 amp breaker. That's it.

80 posts of the wheels falling off the bus. :(

Hang on a minute Rick....the second sentence said "...setting up a shop..." and later on it says "...in a garage..."....SO UNLESS we know the codes, his full intent, where he's at and NOT ALL areas are the same, so it is a electrical codes question as to full correctness to add this one plug/wire....still not enough info...it could require a sub panel BUT I don't think so BUT we AIN'T there and know their code....so it's a codes question and could be multiple types of codes along with a insurance .....NOW after that "NORMAL" here or where your from can be/is here as you explained 2 conductors and a ground BUT there are still factors into the type of wire, the type of wallbox it's installed into (plastic, fiber , metal), romex, conduit, etc., etc. so the safest thing to tell him is check his local codes or pay a electrician to install properly which still requires a permit and inspection in most areas.

Rick this wasn't to argue just to state I did read enough to know it's not simple answer but could be a little more complex not knowing their code/s.
 

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Interested Observer
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All I know is I will never ask an electrical question on the internet or at least this forum. It is doubtful I could get a simple answer. I will just go to YouTube and gather all the information I need from the hammerheads there. I expect I would be far better served than what the OP got from this thread.
 

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Ancient Termite
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Sorry Rick.
It is Two current carrying wires AND a neutral wire AND a ground wire.
Aside from code (NEMA and Local rules) and best practices many table saws these days have a magnetic power switch. All the ones that I have seen need 115 volts to operate the magnetic power switch. Without neutral, the saw probably not turn on.
 

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Rick this wasn't to argue just to state I did read enough to know it's not simple answer but could be a little more complex not knowing their code/s.
He didn't ask what methodology to use for the wiring. He asked the simple question of how many conductors were needed. YOU interjected all of the nonsensical garbage that you felt he was too incompetent to know without your tutelage.Nope, you're not alone here. There are nearly 80 other postings that are doing exactly the same thing. That's the problem.

And no...I'm not even going to go down the asinine path you just tried to interject about subpanels and materials usage, and the deep stretch of trying to drag non-existent codes into a simple question.
 

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Sorry Rick.
It is Two current carrying wires AND a neutral wire AND a ground wire.
Aside from code (NEMA and Local rules) and best practices many table saws these days have a magnetic power switch. All the ones that I have seen need 115 volts to operate the magnetic power switch. Without neutral, the saw probably not turn on.
Did it not occur to you that when I originally mentioned the wheels coming off the bus/wagon, that I was actually referring to you personally? Your post was directly above it, and it was my quasi-polite way of telling you that you should not be answering electrical questions. Sorry, but I'm not feeling so "quasi-polite" tonight.

As for magnetic contactors, they come in many different types and coil ratings. So just because you saw one that only had a 120 volt coil does not mean that it is the only type, or is even common on a 240-volt tool.
 

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where's my table saw?
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This thread has been "off the rails" for a considerable time. Many here have made good points, and there are still some unknowns which throw a wrench in the answers.
The only correct advice given and I believe the OP intends to do, is to consult with a professional contractor for the safest and best way to wire his machine. Since no more information is needed at this point, it's probably best to lock the thread.... JMO.
 
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