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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

About 8 years ago, this homeowner wished to have a VERY finished basement. After they sealed their walls against all moisture, sheet-rocked and installed wall-to-wall rug throughout, they asked us to create a number of built-ins along the walls. We have pictures of this work on the website, but there was a wet bar of which I never got a good photograph. I came across this picture (whose focus is less than great) taken with a cell phone of the bar's wall cabinets. (Notice: the doors are hung with hidden hinges, euro-hinges, just like the rest of the project / You can see the bar at the left edge of this wide shot.)

Arched doors sitting fully inset within a surrounding face frame would always look sensational, as far as I'm concerned..., but I never see it!
I tried this (once) and had a 'time of it' figuring which (Grass) euro hinge would give me the right 'crank' and where the back of the door had to be beveled and the arched rail on the cabinet's face frame had to be filed to ease the front edge of the arch a bit where the door would rub, (if memory serves me). It was as if I would never be able to get a consistent (1/8") width space around the doors perimeter. (I think the picture shows spaces of 1/4" at a few spots).
It was a harder thing to do than I realized when I initially drew it. I thought I could do it just like any inset door. I haven't done it for a client since.
When I saw the picture I thought it would make a good post AND... if any of you know well how to do this, I would like to be able to offer this to clients and I'd end up smarter for it. So...
-I know the thicker the door, the more likely to rub.
-I know the more severe the arch (all the way to a full half round), the more likely to rub.
-I know the tighter the surrounding clearance, the more likely to rub.
-'Thick door' hinges will be a necessity. Perhaps 165 degree and/or 40 mm hinges.
Anyway...
My question is... to you guys who have done this, though everyone's input is welcomed. .
I want to be able to do a full half round arch.
I want to use an adjustable, hidden hinge.
I want to keep the space to a reasonable minimum (3/16"?)
I still want to know how to do it if you feel I HAVE to give up any of these prerequisites. It will just be a detail I'd offer and charge for accordingly.

How DO you do this and do it well???? I'd really appreciate the insight if anybody knows.

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.
 

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It's been a while, but I can't remember doing anything special for inset doors and getting an 1/8" reveal. Unless your frame is thicker than 3/4" you shouldn't need hinges with 40mm cups.

With 35mm full inset hinges, there may be a rotational difference if you use an overlay type hinge with 18mm plate versus a full inset hinge used with a zero plate.








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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With 35mm full inset hinges, there may be a rotational difference if you use an overlay type hinge with 18mm plate versus a full inset hinge used with a zero plate.
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I do most often use a hinge that uses a 9.3mm base plate for my full inset apps. Are you saying that a hinge that uses a shorter base plate for inset would do the trick?. Do you think there is anything to my notion that a 'thick door' hinge will also help?
 

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I do most often use a hinge that uses a 9.3mm base plate for my full inset apps. Are you saying that a hinge that uses a shorter base plate for inset would do the trick?. Do you think there is anything to my notion that a 'thick door' hinge will also help?
There are a lot of conditions to deal with. You have a face frame, and if you use face frame hinges, you may be limiting hinge/plate choices. What's available to use can be confusing.

Face frame hinges, like the hinges for frameless, are available in different overlays. So, just for a point of discussion, the overlay amount can be achieved with a specific hinge and a specific plate. There are many variations from those combinations.

Here's a little procedure that may solve your dilemma. Make a mockup of a door opening. Make a curved faceframe, and mount it on an end. Instead of having the end at the edge of the straight part of the FF, have it run up the inside edge to be flush with the straight part of the FF, like it would be for a frameless cabinet. Or, make the end and FF so the FF protrudes into the cabinet like it would ordinarily. In that situation, you would need a FF hinge. So, instead of that, add a filler strip to the inside of the end to bring out the mounting position of the plate flush with the straight part of the FF.

Make a slab door (any substrate will do). Cut the door to a pattern with 1/8" gap to the opening in the FF. Drill 35mm cup holes on the straight edge of the door. Allow 3/16" from the edge of the door to the edge of the hole. Use this same hole layout for any different hinges to try out.

This will give you the option of experimenting with the basic types of overlay hinges, and the different mounting plates. For example, a full inset door on a frameless cabinet can be done with a full overlay hinge and a 18mm plate, or, a full inset hinge, and a zero plate.

Just to make it clear, the mockup you'll make is to mimic a frameless cabinet, but still have the appearance of a face framed cabinet.








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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never use face frame 35mm hinges. We always create a build-up block to have the base plate even with the openings edge (as if inset for frameless). I'll go ahead with a mock-up. Thanks.
 

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Arched Inset Cabinet Doors with concealed hinges

We recently completed a kitchen project with arched inset doors and concealed hinges. After making the face frame, a template was made and given to the door company. I was unhappy with the doors but here are pictures of the finish product. From now on, although it is cost prohibitive, I will be making all our inset doors in house. There just isn't room for error with the inset. Since this was the first time we've done arched inset with concealed hinges, as concealed was the client's preference, finding the correct hinges was the biggest challenge. Blum hinges were used throughout the rest of the kitchen but Soss 203 zinc invisible hinges were used on these arched doors. Mortise into the FF and door and install. Easy enough but the hinges don't run cheap. At just over $25/pair on Amazon and more time consuming to install that Blum hinges, if you had a kitchen full of these you'd have to charge accordingly. Good news is that they come in a variety of finishes so we were able to match the hinge color to the client's exterior hardware.
 

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