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I’m not sure if this is allowed, I am not a professional but this relates to work done by a professional and what you as a professional would have done. We ordered and were made a custom table, exact same wood species Maple with a reclaimed barn beam base. Attached is photo. Color on left was their showroom sample. Slightly different design was intentional. But right side photo is finished product. Would you have completed this piece with that much difference or would you have checked with your client? Would this color match be acceptable to you? Just a stock off the shelf stain color. The maker is fighting us on in saying they don’t guarantee a match and all wood is different. I get the variation thing but we are quite disappointed on this final result. They offered to refinish the piece for an additional $500 we thought this was outrageous. At one point I offered to kick in a couple hundred just to be done with the whole mess but they refused. At this point we are asking for our money back are we being unreasonable? Is there any way to prove that they may have used the wrong color or told us the sample on left was a different color than what it actually was right out of the gate?
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I am an amateur, i don’t sell my work. However if i made that table for myself, and was trying to match the color of the tables i would have been extremely disappointed in myself.

I don't know if there is anyway to tell if they used the same color stain. But that is really not the issue. As i read your post you wanted the color of the tables to match, you really did not care how they did it.
Wish you luck
 

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I definitely see the difference in the coloring of the table but it's not as significant as you might think. Sometimes the wood is just that much different and how it takes a stain is different. Were they actually going for an exact match? If so then they missed it. I like the look of the table on the right more than the one on the left so I would have no problem with it at all.

As for refinishing it for $500, when I had my shop in the mid 80's we were refinishing tables like that for $400 to $500 back then so I would think it would be at least double that now, if not triple the price.
 

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I actually like the one on the right better, but you don't and they obviously used a drastically different finishing process on the two tables.
 
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I'm not a professional wood worker. I mainly build projects for myself, my family and friends. It looks to me like they picked the wrong color of stain to finish your table as compared to the sample piece they showed you. Maple varies in color a bit like all other woods but not to that level.

The reclaimed wood is a different story. I've been working through some old reclaimed barnwood over the last year and I've found that the smaller pieces that require fewer planing/jointing passes maintain their darker "aged" finish quite a bit better than the longer boards that require many more planing/jointing passes to straighten out.

The first picture at the bottom of this post is a reclaimed black locust barnwood table that I built for a friend. All of the pieces came from the same barn and they all started out nice and dark like the breadboard ends of the table. As I took more and more passes on the longer table top boards to square them up they continued to lighten up. Most people that have seen this table in person assumed I used a different type of wood for the breadboard ends.

The second picture at the bottom of this post is a mobile base I made for my bandsaw. I made this entire base from one piece of douglas fir that had been sitting in my house since 1980 (it was an extra rafter board that was used for a simple shelf in the garage when my house was built). The dark red boards on the outside of the base required only a couple of passes on the planer compared to the light center boards that I had to take down more than a 1/4" on each side to get to the thickness I needed. The outer boards have a really nice aged red to them where the boards I worked down for the center section look like brand new & boring light douglas fir.

As far as purchasing furniture goes I've bought 12 pieces of Stickley furniture over the last 8 years. Every piece is quartersawn white oak with the same stain selection. Even though those pieces were bought years apart they are all almost identical in color.

Stickly is a well known furniture maker so you'd probably expect their pieces to be consistant but the furniture I replaced with the stickly pieces was built by a local Wisconsin furniture maker. I bought 9 pieces of furniture from them over a 5 year period that were all made out of red oak. The color on those 9 pieces matched extremely well.

As far your situation goes I think the company that built your table should refund your money or refinish the product for free as it appears to me to be a stain selection mistake made by the person that finished your table.

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As a professional Industrial Designer with 30 years in the field, I would not have accepted the darker version upon delivery and would not have paid for it.
It could be grounds for a small claims court case, I donno?
On the other hand, if the darker finish, which I happen to prefer as do others, will suffice in your decor, then that's is your choice.
Facebook will not be the companies' friend if you publish these results.
Even a blind squirrel will get an acorn on occasion, but a visually impaired person should not be responsible for color matching stains. You can't blame this issue, the drastic difference in not only color but the shade or value, on variations in the wood, sorry.
 

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Termite
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Our painter at the furniture can color match anything. When we take a new restaurant on we are given an example and has ti be be matched with several varieties of wood. Jason will play all day with this till he is satisfied and then we ship the samples.

What you have shown was finished and sent on. Not much time was put into correcting the color before it was finished..

Refuse and get small claims court. Is this a reputable business?
 

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It's not right. They used the wrong color. The onus is on them to make it right. They did a fine job finishing it but if it's the wrong color, that doesn't matter. I'd start working my way up the food chain at that place until they agree to fix it.
 

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I also like the one on the right. The one on the left seems to clash with the flooring on the right picture. Regardless; they certainly messed up the stain color and it's sad that they aren't buying their mistake. I personally would probably build you a new one instead of trying to refinish and sell the original to someone else. I know there's no way I could do a refinish on that table for $500.00
 

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Your finished table looks off. The 3 samples displayed are Vandyke Brown, Colonial Maple and light oak. Your finished table tends to be on the red of brown side where the original looks more on the yellow side of brown. Here's the rub the red is clashing with your floor. Ask them to redo it in the Vandyke brown tone and pay the $500 . You will be happy . Just my 25 years of experience.:cool:
 

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It doesn't matter who here thinks what looks better. You contracted for a look and you didn't get it. That is just sloppy workmanship, I would have refused it at he door. I can spend a day or two trying to matching stains and have turned down jobs where knew I couldn't match a stain perfectly to match, for example like a table leaf I knew would never match the manufacturers that wouldn't stand out.
But that is not even close.
 

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I’m not sure if this is allowed, I am not a professional but this relates to work done by a professional and what you as a professional would have done. We ordered and were made a custom table, exact same wood species Maple with a reclaimed barn beam base. Attached is photo. Color on left was their showroom sample. Slightly different design was intentional. But right side photo is finished product. Would you have completed this piece with that much difference or would you have checked with your client? Would this color match be acceptable to you? Just a stock off the shelf stain color. The maker is fighting us on in saying they don’t guarantee a match and all wood is different. I get the variation thing but we are quite disappointed on this final result. They offered to refinish the piece for an additional $500 we thought this was outrageous. At one point I offered to kick in a couple hundred just to be done with the whole mess but they refused. At this point we are asking for our money back are we being unreasonable? Is there any way to prove that they may have used the wrong color or told us the sample on left was a different color than what it actually was right out of the gate? View attachment 428400
There is definitely a lighter and amber shift, but the lighting and flooring could contribute to that. The entire left pic has an amber shift, which could be as simple as incandescent lighting versus a cooler temp lighting. Businesses work differently. I would rarely get involved with color matches. On all custom color jobs I would do a story board of the exact finish and process. If accepted, I had the client sign the story board as approving the finish. On stain grade it was made clear of deviations in wood colors and tones. People underestimate the impact of ambient light on the color of a wood finish. I always suggest the client take the storyboard home and look at it in the room where it will be, at different angles, different times of day.
 
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