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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We were to build a 42″ round, pedestal, dining table in cherry. Cost was an issue so we bought the column and legs and only had to make the table’s top, assemble the parts and finish it. No skirt. Just a single center ‘stretcher’, sitting underneath at 90 degrees to the table top’s planks.
We purchased 6/4 cherry in rough form, jointed and planed the planks down to 5/4, dead straight and square. We aligned the boards using a 42" stick w/ a nail in it's center to achieve the best 42" round without any sapwood.

We used double stacked biscuits every 10 inches or so, glued all edges completely, pipe clamped and (with a wet rag) removed all the glue that had seeped from all the seams. One of the ways to minimize any curvature to the top is to alternate the growth rings from one board to the next. In this picture, I used photoshop to highlight the boards rings on the end grain.

When dry, we made a ‘compass’ to delineate the circle (a stick with a nail at one end and a pencil at the other). We worked from the bottom side so the small nail hole wouldn't show on the top. We used a jigsaw to cut out a rough circle, 1/4″ outside the pencil line.

We then made a circle-cutting jig (much like the ‘compass’). This makes plunge-cutting a concise circle with a router fairly easy.

I cut the final circle by making a number of passes, each 1/4″ deeper than the last, until the cutting bit made it all the way through. The speed at which I moved the router was important as too fast could create tear out at the edges and too slow would leave the exposed edge with burn marks. I cleaned the bit often and used a tool blade coating spray on the cutting bit to minimize burn.

To attach the table top to the pedestal, we made a stretcher board which sits just beneath the top. This will help keep the table’s top flat and still allow for it’s inevitable movement (expansion and contraction). Here you see my illustration of it and the actual piece attached to the base.


After finishing, it all came together nicely. Our client was very pleased.



Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.
 

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Very, very nice build and nice follow-along as well. The finish on the cherry looks really good. How do you do the flutes in the feet? Special router bit? Anyways, great job!
 

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Excellent table it is beautiful. You can never go wrong with cherry it always looks and smells good. What stain did you use and did you have any problem routing the profile?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very, very nice build and nice follow-along as well. The finish on the cherry looks really good. How do you do the flutes in the feet? Special router bit? Anyways, great job!
As I mentioned. I bought the legs and column. This client could not afford us to hand build the entire thing so I thought I'd at least get a commission from it, albeit a smaller one.
BTW, I happen to have a router bit that cuts 4 small beads like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fantastic table. That's some nice work.

Where did you get the wood? I'm sure it wasn't HD in Brewster.
Nice to hear from a local.
Home Depot was out of 6/4 cherry. LOL
Condon's Lumber in Stormville
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Excellent table it is beautiful. You can never go wrong with cherry it always looks and smells good. What stain did you use and did you have any problem routing the profile?
Shot with Conversion varnish / the stain was a mixture of two (whose names I'm forgetting)
Outside profile was a large thumbnail bit.
 

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Russell Hudson said:
Nice to hear from a local.
Home Depot was out of 6/4 cherry. LOL
Condon's Lumber in Stormville
Yeah, I work in Brewster at the tractor place. Condons is great, gotta keep the wife out of there or she wants to come home with the expensive stuff.
 
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