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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
call 2 (Copy).jpg
I thought I would do some practice on calls with the Robert Sorby texturing tool. The tool I am using is the small version. The calls are not finished, just trying on different types of wood. So far Padauk and Maple seem to work. I tried Marble wood and it tears the wood. I turned them at 390rpm's than sanded to get the very sharp edges removed. I turned the wood to rough dimensions, textured, than turned up the speed to develop the remainder of the contours. What you actually do is texture than using the EW detail tool created the coves and beads, this enables you to get sharp corners as long as you cut below the texture.
 

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I thought I would do some practice on calls with the Robert Sorby texturing tool. The tool I am using is the small version. The calls are not finished, just trying on different types of wood. So far Padauk and Maple seem to work. I tried Marble wood and it tears the wood. I turned them at 390rpm's than sanded to get the very sharp edges removed. I turned the wood to rough dimensions, textured, than turned up the speed to develop the remainder of the contours. What you actually do is texture than using the EW detail tool created the coves and beads, this enables you to get sharp corners as long as you cut below the texture.
Is the texture tool the same as the micro spiraling tool (the one that uses the mini modular handle)? I have that and haven't managed to get results as clean as yours. I've not tried it on either of those woods though. Any tips on the use of that tool?

Edit: I noticed you had trouble with Marblewood. Interesting. I think I've only ever tested it on poplar. I'm tempted to try some various scraps of harder woods left over from pen turning tomorrow morning.
 

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Looks good :thumbsup: It was a good tip to texture the area and then turn away to leave crisp edges.

The softer the wood, the larger the cutter must be used or it can just turn it to mush. I haven't used mine for over a year but I have some pecan it should work well with. I had the best results with hard dense woods like ash, hickory, etc.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
TCwood wrote:

Is the texture tool the same as the micro spiraling tool (the one that uses the mini modular handle)? I have that and haven't managed to get results as clean as yours. I've not tried it on either of those woods though. Any tips on the use of that tool?

Edit: I noticed you had trouble with Marblewood. Interesting. I think I've only ever tested it on poplar. I'm tempted to try some various scraps of harder woods left over from pen turning tomorrow morning.

Answer:

Yes it is one and the same tool, I set mine to align with the far left detent of the tool, (there is a scribed line on the shaft) the bottom plate is about 1/2 from the cutting spur, put your tool rest exactly at the center of the part. Rest the tool on the tool rest so that the tool is below center. Start by applying pressure until the spur rotates. How slowly move the tool right to left and keep up the pressure. move as far to the left as you want the texture to be than stop. Stop the lathe and observe what you have done. To go deeper I placed the tool so the spur points align with the grooves, while holding it in this position start the lathe . The spur will rotate as you pick up speed apply more pressure, and move the tool to the left. Don't worry about the noise, just keep experimenting with these steps. Stopping the lathe is my own procedure. I know the instructions are really bad. When you are making the grooves they may not end up clean at first just go deeper and they will clean up.

Now about the wood it should have good close grain (Hard wood) popular will tear out and not hold up to the cutting. I am going to try walnut next.

When you make your cuts make them in a piece you have turned down to the approximate size from the end result size. To make the end crisp use a detail spindle gouge or EW detail tool to clean up the end and starting points. I went to a demo about 3 years ago and I had the full size tool which I could not get the results I wanted so I sold it and bought this tool and it has sat on the shelf ever since until yesterday. I just decided it was going to pay it's way or I would sell it, so it is a keeper now. Just practice:thumbsup:

I will post the finished call when I get the insert turned and try to take photos as I go. Hope this helps.
 
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