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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a way to hook up a 110 volt light to my 220-volt bandsaw? I have the 14BX 2.5 HP saw. I would like to be able to plug it into my saw. I know Laguna offers a light but it's about $150.

I know I have left some much-needed information out so ask away and I will try and answer your questions. Thanks for any help. Don.
 

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A small step-down transformer (Xfr) would be one method that is sure to work. And if you use a 110V LED fixture the wattage rating for the Xfr is low so its small and cheap.
 

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When I read your post I thought maybe the saw would have a 110v provision for the accessory light, but looking at this info for the light: LED Chameleon 90CRI Machine Lamp
Seems it can run on either 110v or 220v. Does Laguna have another light without an arm? This one with an arm is $175. :eek:

Bulb shopping is confusing these days, how about a LED bulb that can handle 220v?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I read your post I thought maybe the saw would have a 110v provision for the accessory light, but looking at this info for the light: LED Chameleon 90CRI Machine Lamp
Seems it can run on either 110v or 220v. Does Laguna have another light without an arm? This one with an arm is $175. :eek:

Bulb shopping is confusing these days, how about a LED bulb that can handle 220v?
Bob, the female outlet on the bandsaw is 220v. I also agree with you about it being able to run on both 220v and 110v, but I would not try 110v because I would be afraid the whole thing would blow up.
 

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I know this is not what you are asking, but I will throw it in anyway.......... If you bandsaw is near a wall, you can wall mount a 4' Led. When on sale at Harbor Freight, the price drops down from $29 to $19. They go on sale often. If your band saw lives in the middle of the floor, then you can hang it from the ceiling. They throw off A LOT of light and so far mine have held up almost a year already. I'm in my shop at least 5 or 6 days a week for around 5 to 6 hours a day.
My shop is my Fortress of Solitude.
 

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Bob, the female outlet on the bandsaw is 220v. I also agree with you about it being able to run on both 220v and 110v, but I would not try 110v because I would be afraid the whole thing would blow up.
I only briefly looked on Amazon, there are LED bulbs for 220v, but I don't know about fixtures, light color etc. If someone here doesn't have an answer then maybe ask on DIY Home Improvement Forum
 

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I've got these on several machines in the shop, you can hard wire them in if you are inclined.

 

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I have the same saw on order in 110v, I’m guessing the reason the light is rated either way is simply so they can produce one accessory for both saws. Sorry, don’t have my saw in yet so can’t say I have an alternative lined up yet to offer as advice.
 

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Is there a way to hook up a 110 volt light to my 220-volt bandsaw? I have the 14BX 2.5 HP saw. I would like to be able to plug it into my saw. I know Laguna offers a light but it's about $150.

I know I have left some much-needed information out so ask away and I will try and answer your questions. Thanks for any help. Don.
In order to make 240 volts you would use both hot leads, no neutral. To get 120 volts, use one hot lead and a neutral. It would want to be wired in ahead of the bandsaw's switch so you can see what you are doing before hand. Obviously, you'll have to shut it off when finished. I also have about 5 of those LED sewing machine lights and I love them! They have a magnetic base so they'll "attach" to any ferrous or steel surface. At my wood kitchen table I use a piece of 1/4" round plate that's small 2", but heavy enough to keep it from tipping over.

edited to reflect changes to neutral wire!
 
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Buy yourself a 110 volt light that you like. Then, as woodenthings suggests, cut off the male plug and wire the lamp directly into the box where your 220 v receptacle is. Connect one lamp wire to either the red or black wire (one or the other of the two flat blades) and the other to the ground (the round prong). If you want the lamp to be removable, direct wire a new 110 receptacle next to the 220 receptacle and use that for the lamp.
 

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Bob, the female outlet on the bandsaw is 220v. I also agree with you about it being able to run on both 220v and 110v, but I would not try 110v because I would be afraid the whole thing would blow up.
If what you have is two hot wires and a ground then you couldn't do the light without rewiring the saw. It would need a neutral wire to run a 110V light. A neutral wire is considered a current carrying line and if you used the ground as a neutral you run the risk of getting shocked as it could make the body of the machine live. .
 

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If what you have is two hot wires and a ground then you couldn't do the light without rewiring the saw. It would need a neutral wire to run a 110V light. A neutral wire is considered a current carrying line and if you used the ground as a neutral you run the risk of getting shocked as it could make the body of the machine live. .
Who are you, and what have you done with the real Steve Neul? :p

Steve is correct, and the other posters suggesting you can use the ground as a current carrying conductor are wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Who are you, and what have you done with the real Steve Neul? :p

Steve is correct, and the other posters suggesting you can use the ground as a current carrying conductor are wrong.
So Rick, what would you do if you found yourself in this situation?
 

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It is not as difficult as you think. If you have a factory installed magnetic power switch, you more than likely have 120 Volts inside the switch box. If not you have to do a bit of detective work. Does your power plug have 4 wires? If yes you are home free. If only three wires you should get a free standing light that is either 120 V or battery powered.

In North America the ac power from the power company uses four colors:
Green is AC safety ground and should never be used as part of the power circuit.
Black is one half or phase A of the 240 V power.
Red is one half or phase B of the 240 V power.
Phase is really a misnomer as what we're talking about the top half of the AC Sine wave vs. the bottom half.
White is the neutral wire.

Between red and black is 240 Volts.
Between either red or black and white is 120 V.
The white should never be switched but connected all the time.

Manufacturers that offer 240 V single phase or 208 V three phase variations of a machine tend to use the same off / on switch in either model. In single phase, the third set of contacts just isn't used with 240 V single phase. As a long ago neighbor would say, "It doesn't make no never mind."

With all of that said, unplug the saw. Go into the switch box and connect your 120 volt lamp to white and either black or red. If the lamp has a switch, connect to either black or red before the switch. If the lamp does not have a switch connect the wire to the other side of the switch.

The manual that came with the band saw should have very explicit wiring diagrams. Use them to get a good idea of the wiring within the saw.
 

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If you have a factory installed magnetic power switch, you more than likely have 120 Volts inside the switch box.
No, this is not a valid assumption to make, unless the tool has 120V accessories or some other reason for having 120V present. Motor contactors come in all voltage configurations, and a manufacturer isn't going to use a 120 volt coil only to have to install a transformer. And even with that, if they do add a transformer (such as older model Delta tablesaws), then it will use low-voltage 24V coil and wiring.
 

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So Rick, what would you do if you found yourself in this situation?
Possibly the cheapest/easiest solution would be to use two lights and wire them in series. The proper way would be to get an eBay transformer.

Hmmm, Just thought of another solution that would be to use an LED light that has a switching power supply that will automatically take either 120/240 at the input. These are pretty common, and all you'd have to do is check the specs to see "120/240" on it.

EDIT: Here's one of the first hits from searching eBay for an LED power supply. Only $8
LED Power Supply Transformator 50W Driver
 

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So Rick, what would you do if you found yourself in this situation?
After thinking about it, I decided to look a little closer, and searched eBay for "LED Machine Light". There's a whole bunch of options for as low as $10, but I like several of these magnetic base models with either articulating arms or flex-arms for only $30. In this particular case, you could cut off the plug and wire the lamp directly into your power switch, so that when you turn on the saw, the light will come on too. (Granted, there's probably a 1-second delay for startup on the power supply.)

Magnetic LED Light
 

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No, this is not a valid assumption to make, unless the tool has 120V accessories or some other reason for having 120V present. Motor contactors come in all voltage configurations, and a manufacturer isn't going to use a 120 volt coil only to have to install a transformer. And even with that, if they do add a transformer (such as older model Delta tablesaws), then it will use low-voltage 24V coil and wiring.
Yes, Rick.
However if there isn't a white wire in the switch box there ain't neutral in the switch. And if only three wires in the power cord, there ain't 120 V in the switch.

In todays modern machines manufactures are willing to spend an extra dollar on redundant hardware for a three phase switch rather than hundreds in labor, data base programming and inventory. The extra pole in the switch, as my neighbor would say "It doesn't make no never mind." And because 120 V is available between L1 and Neutral in either single phase or three phase, unique wiring costs are avoided once again. The poles L2 or L3 to neutral on three phase could be substituted for the 120 V source.

Because there is no such thing as a "standard, do everything" 240 Volt plug and socket, the customer provides and installs the power cord.
 
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