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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you read the article I posted here:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/router-table-modifications-using-lock-miter-bit-51586/

You saw me end up making a rather small box for which I had no set plan to use when I made it.



Well I got to thinking about it and remembered that special tool my wife had gotten me for Christmas.



Yes friends you are looking at my very own Sonic Screwdriver from Doctor Who.

It became apparent that my small test box was the perfect size to create a permanent display for my most prized tool!

So after doing some additional machining to the box, adding a half lap jointed top piece, and using some sky blue dye (it looks green in the photos, but its really blue) followed by 5 coats of rattle can spray lacquer and lots of between coat sanding with 800 grit wet/dry paper, I ended up with a nice display case that can be hung like a picture or simply set up on my desk.





The wood is cheap 1/2" Poplar that I had on hand. The front uses 1/4" Lexan (also from my pile of past project left overs) for its ability to remain clear and not get hazed over. The clamp holding the device is just one of those spring clamps for holding paint brushes on the wall that I added a strip of "stick on" red velvet jewelry box liner to. Lastly, I used hinges that simply screwed to the outside of the box to give it some style.
 

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Over the hills n far away
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Looks good Johnnie.
Can you answer something for me?
Why sand between coats of lacquer? I mean doesn't the solvent in the lacquer sort of dissolve the previous coat and meld them together.
I don't sand lacquer until the very end and then I don't really sand it but more buff it with cloth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks good Johnnie.
Can you answer something for me?
Why sand between coats of lacquer? I mean doesn't the solvent in the lacquer sort of dissolve the previous coat and meld them together.
I don't sand lacquer until the very end and then I don't really sand it but more buff it with cloth.

Thanks. This was one of those "Now what?" projects. I made the box to see if the lock miter bit actually worked and how small of a piece I could use with it. Then I had to figure out what to do with it once I had cut up the wood. I hate to waste anything. You should see my stock of short cut offs and assorted nuts and bolts.

The answer to your question is both yes, and no. The solvent does dissolve the previous coat, however, so far I've only used spray cans of lacquer and always end up with tiny specks of spray that make the surface rough. Also, I seem to always have some issues with the grain raising after the first and sometimes second coats. I've found that sanding between coats makes the final product come out as smooth as glass all over.

I may try the wipe on lacquer and see if I get the same results.
 

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Nice I like it
 
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I wood if I could.
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Very cool. That's great how the box happened to be just the right size. Nice coloring. I remember you used that dye in another project. It sure seems to do a great job.

I believe you've done the good doctor proud :thumbsup: Fine work, as always.
 

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The answer to your question is both yes, and no. The solvent does dissolve the previous coat, however, so far I've only used spray cans of lacquer and always end up with tiny specks of spray that make the surface rough. Also, I seem to always have some issues with the grain raising after the first and sometimes second coats. I've found that sanding between coats makes the final product come out as smooth as glass all over.

I may try the wipe on lacquer and see if I get the same results.
If you use a spray can, try a few things. Slow down your path, and adjust the distance from the work. Sounds like you're not getting the path wet enough.

Other than bulk lacquer to spray out of a cup/gun, and spray cans, lacquer can be a "brushing" lacquer, which is basically a retarded version of spray grade. IMO, it doesn't work well if wiped.







.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you use a spray can, try a few things. Slow down your path, and adjust the distance from the work. Sounds like you're not getting the path wet enough.

Other than bulk lacquer to spray out of a cup/gun, and spray cans, lacquer can be a "brushing" lacquer, which is basically a retarded version of spray grade. IMO, it doesn't work well if wiped.







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Thanks for the advise Cabinetman.

I'm always afraid of getting the path too wet and ending up with runs. So I've made it a point to go light and just mist the lacquer instead of actually laying it on. Add that to my working conditions out on the carport and you have the reason for my misting issues.

Next time I'll try putting it on heavier and see what happens.
 

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Thanks for the advise Cabinetman.

I'm always afraid of getting the path too wet and ending up with runs. So I've made it a point to go light and just mist the lacquer instead of actually laying it on. Add that to my working conditions out on the carport and you have the reason for my misting issues.

Next time I'll try putting it on heavier and see what happens.
It's not really putting it on heavier, but more like maintaining a wet path, and not having it run. If you use extra lighting to create a glare on the work, you get a better idea on how wet it's getting. Set up your spray paths so the subsequent paths overlap one that's already done.






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