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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am about ready to glue this up but there are a few knocks in the boards. I could find any true straight and flat pieces at the length I needed.

The material is milled to needed thickness - can't take any more off.

Would biscuits be ok for alignment or too weak? Should I go with splines? Would they help with lining the glue joints up better?
 

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Old School
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So, I am about ready to glue this up but there are a few knocks in the boards. I could find any true straight and flat pieces at the length I needed.

The material is milled to needed thickness - can't take any more off.

Would biscuits be ok for alignment or too weak? Should I go with splines? Would they help with lining the glue joints up better?
For a glue up, I would not use biscuits. If anything I would use a well fitted spline. In your glue up, use clamps and cauls to keep the boards flat. This procedure has been covered many times. If you missed it I'll find a link for you.







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So, I am about ready to glue this up but there are a few knocks in the boards. I could find any true straight and flat pieces at the length I needed.

The material is milled to needed thickness - can't take any more off.

Would biscuits be ok for alignment or too weak? Should I go with splines? Would they help with lining the glue joints up better?
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What Wood are you using? Make sure to check for alternating grain patterns to help avoid cupping.
Walnut - already did all that. The base is all 8/4 walnut as well and will act as a great stabilizer. I oriented all of what amounts to quartersawn faces up and down to better resist movement.
 

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If it's flat and of uniform thickness then careful clamping and alignment with the use of cauls should be all thats needed. 8/4 material should provide adequate surface area for glueup that the use of splines/biscuits should not be necessary. Just my opinion. When working with walnut I always wipe it down with acetone prior to glue up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If it's flat and of uniform thickness then careful clamping and alignment with the use of cauls should be all thats needed. 8/4 material should provide adequate surface area for glueup that the use of splines/biscuits should not be necessary. Just my opinion. When working with walnut I always wipe it down with acetone prior to glue up.

the base is 8/4 - the top is 7/8" +
 

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bzguy
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This is unorthodox but I use cope and stick door knives or bits to "tongue and groove" long board glue ups.
If you make sure stock is held flat on shaper or router table, (vertical finger board or better yet stock feeder) they align perfectly making for a much stronger glue joint and eliminate the need for cauls.
 

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bzguy
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Sure, dowels would work, biscuit machines are just faster than doweling jigs.
There are endless ways to do any project, everyone has there own tried and true favorite.
I have a dedicated router table with 2 routers on opposite sides of a wide fence for cope and stick doors.
That's why i do it the way I do, it works great.
 
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