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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a #5 hand plane and love it, use it nearly every time in go in my shop. Right now im working on a heavy duty shelf, 1.5" thick and 6 feet long. Since im lacking in any stock by those dimensions im doing a considerable amount of jointing. Would a #6 or #7 give me a particular advantage over my #5, I know its longer and will ride over the high spots better, but will that exta length and weight be worth me picking up another plane?
 

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I have a #5 hand plane and love it, use it nearly every time in go in my shop. Right now im working on a heavy duty shelf, 1.5" thick and 6 feet long. Since im lacking in any stock by those dimensions im doing a considerable amount of jointing. Would a #6 or #7 give me a particular advantage over my #5, I know its longer and will ride over the high spots better, but will that exta length and weight be worth me picking up another plane?
The No. 5 is a very useful plane as you mentioned, but for edge jointing longer does help. No single plane can perform all our planing tasks which is why there are so many design variations.

If you have the money I would get another plane. Which plane may be personal preference.

No. 6 and No. 7 have the same blade, 2 3/8in wide. Useful for surface planing, but not going to help in jointing. The length of these planes will help in jointing. The No. 7 is referred to as a jointer plane, the No. 6 as a foreplane.

No. 6 is about 18in long. No. 7 is about 22in long. Longer sole should help to get the edge straight easier than a No. 5. Some folks like Patrick Leach prefer even longer jointer, a No. 8.

Whether you should get a No. 6 or No. 7 is a bit of personal preference. Longer also means more weight, which can mean getting tired easier.

I have a No. 6 and No. 7 and find it easier to use the No. 6 due to the lighter weight.
 

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I think so. I've been learning to plane down rough stock and have a #5 set very wide for taking the tops of the mill marks off and a #6 set wide for the remaining roughness. The extra mass really helps get through sticky spots, and the wider blade is a benefit. It can take nice thick shavings.

For the finer tuning I have a #4 set for as thin as I can, a #5 1/2 set moderate, and a #8 set thin.
 

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At what point do you just decide that it is better to run the stock through a power jointer instead of using a hand plane???

And follow up question: Will a #7 or #8 be wide enough to handle planing the face of a board instead of a planer?
 

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For planing rough stock, I use a 15" long transition plane with the iron shaped to an 8" radius (Foreplane). I can remove about 1/8" of material at a time. I then use one of my #5's to flatten the piece and remove the troughs from the Foreplane. If the board needs further straightening, I get out the #7. The mass of the 7 is nice, but a really sharp iron, and a bit of lube on the sole of the plane is more important.
 

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At what point do you just decide that it is better to run the stock through a power jointer instead of using a hand plane???

And follow up question: Will a #7 or #8 be wide enough to handle planing the face of a board instead of a planer?
If you don't own a jointer, or planer that isn't an option. Width of the plane is not an issue with a hand plane as it is with power equipment. With a hand plane, you are not limited to planing with the length of the board. You plane at an angle and can work up to an infinite width.
 

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I have a #5 hand plane and love it, use it nearly every time in go in my shop. Right now im working on a heavy duty shelf, 1.5" thick and 6 feet long. Since im lacking in any stock by those dimensions im doing a considerable amount of jointing. Would a #6 or #7 give me a particular advantage over my #5, I know its longer and will ride over the high spots better, but will that exta length and weight be worth me picking up another plane?
For some odd reason you don't feel it's necessary to reply to your own threads or generous offers by PM - so I think I'll sit this one out.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At what point do you just decide that it is better to run the stock through a power jointer instead of using a hand plane???

And follow up question: Will a #7 or #8 be wide enough to handle planing the face of a board instead of a planer?
I am in the market for a power jointer, have been checking craigslist and locally just dont have one yet.
 

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Sorry if it sounded like a snub. Wasn't meant to be. I asked because I am thinking of a bigger plane than my number 4 plane for jointing too. Just wasn't sure if it is better to go with a power planer or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sorry if it sounded like a snub. Wasn't meant to be. I asked because I am thinking of a bigger plane than my number 4 plane for jointing too. Just wasn't sure if it is better to go with a power planer or not.
No snobbiness taken. I cut off part of my left pinky a few months ago with a router. It was my own stupid mistake I know but it left me with a preference for hand tools. Silly I know but unless Its saving me a massive amount of time Id rather avoid the noise dust and vibration by sticking with a hand tool.
 

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Sorry if it sounded like a snub. Wasn't meant to be. I asked because I am thinking of a bigger plane than my number 4 plane for jointing too. Just wasn't sure if it is better to go with a power planer or not.
Only add power tools to improve efficiency. The proper hand tools will give you the flexibility to accomplish any project.

I can plane a 30" wide table top flat and level with my bench planes. Most of us could not justify purchasing a power planer large enough to accomplish the same task.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I do plan on getting a jointer but think i can do without a power planer. If I really needed a powered alternative Id use a router sled and a surfacing bit. It hasn't taken me long to plane any of my projects with a hand plane so Im in no hurry.
 
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