Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rather new wood river #5 hand plane thats giving me some tear out issues. Yes the grain is fairly irregular but I have been lead to believe I can do a few things to remedy this. I have moved my chip breaker forward to about 1/32 of an inch from the blade edge. I was also going to try to adjust the frog forward a bit but cant seem to find any info about doing this. Is this a regular solution for tear out or is it ridiculous to do this to something as big as a #5? I have never adjusted the frog and want to be sure i do it right any directions on the best way to go about this... or is it time to invest in a #3?
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
The size of the plane is irrelevant other than ease of tuning. While a jack's job is not see-through shavings it can produce them.

Put quite simply the frog can be adjusted as close to the mouth as possible while still allowing the shaving to pass through.

Sharpness is the first priority of smoothness.

There comes a point when no amount of tuning will remove all tear-out for difficult stock. The next best is a low angle plane. The least likely to cause tear-out (king of smooth) is a scraper or scraper plane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am working on this while Im revitalizing a scraper plane, figured i would came at this issue from two angles. And my #5 is sharp enough to take hair off my arm so i dont think thats the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
I did some testing http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/30376 for chip breaker/frog adjustments. They really work in harmony, and there is not right or wrong. I've restored a lot of planes, and it amazes me how two identical planes can act differently. Trial and error is your best approach.

I will disagree with Jean on one point (and disagreeing with Jean doesn't happen very often). Jean wrote "The next best is a low angle plane." In my opinion the next best thing is a high angle. That's why infill's are so highly regarded, they are usually 50 or 55*. Low angles were meant for end grain, but can be a benefit for some difficult grain, but high angle seems to always be better (not always good, but better) The higher the angle, the better it gets. The higher the angle the closer to a scraper you become.
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
:laughing: Thanks for keeping me honest, Don. :thumbup:

You are absolutely correct... We don't disagree, I just obviously have trouble converting thoughts to words sometimes!

Yes, I mistakingly wrote LA... It would indeed be HA! My mistake!

Edit:

And I failed to mention bevel angle of the iron is also important for the same reason.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top