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Hey Folks.

I enjoy the look of the thick, clear, glossy finish from a product called Envirotex Lite. It is a an epoxy resin mix. To prepare it, each of the two included liquid parts must be mixed thoroughly in a two part process.

When I combine and stir them, I generally create about 97 billion bubbles with each attempt. The manufacturer promises they will disappear if you simply exhale your breath onto the little fellers. - if you are unfortunate enough to find a few in the finished goop in the first place

As a last resort, using a hair dryer on the few remaining rascals is supposed to pop them into oblivion. I wind up, in the end, generating a total of about 3 trillion bubbles, regardless what I try.

Your thought? Thanks.
 

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You are probably being too aggressive stirring the finish. If you stir slower it will create a lot less bubbles. Some of the bubbles will be emitted from the wood too. The remaining bubbles you will just have to take care of with the hair dryer.
 

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I've used pour on epoxy a couple times. I also had a lot of bubbles. A butane torch on low held back about 10" and just dusted over the surface worked for me. I've read that it's the CO2 that draws out the bubbles. You definitely are not trying to get the epoxy hot, just blowing the exhaust over the surface.
 

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Village Idiot
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Mix slower, don't work air into the mix and start off using a hair dryer and you should be okay. I can't imagine how you're getting a finish full of bubbles just by mixing unless you're using a whisk or a power drill.

Also, I know there's a limit to how many characters can be used in a title, but in this case I don't believe that the 2 characters saved by using "4ever" instead of "forever" were really needed
 

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You can also try a high pour, so that the falling liquid becomes really narrow just before it hits the surface. This break a lot of the bigger bubbles and give some of the smaller ones less distance to travel to get out of the epoxy.

Regards,
Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you, guys. Appreciate your responses.

I have tried stirring slower. I tried not stirring at all, just swirling the container gently. That has worked the best so far.

On the box cover it says, "1 thick coat equals 50 coats of varnish". I'll try that next. So it takes a few months. T'aint cheap, neither.

The bowls are Hickory and it is harder than diamonds. Haven't found any finish that looks as good as EnviroTex, yet. That's the problem. It is so dense, nothing penetrates very well. But, Hickory is cool, too, so tough, so hard, heavy and beautiful, and cheap around here.

Thanks again.

BTW, anybody know where to get a new belt for a lathe?
 

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Maybe I've confused Hickory with concrete. The stuff I'm turning is so hard and dense, wood stains bead up on the stuff and fly off, just about.

I've been known to get things twisted alright. Ask WW III. She hasn't found one thing I've done right since I promised to leave her alone if she'd marry me.

Love wood, though. Strong and solid and the product of sunlight, water and dirt. Smells good and polishes up nice.

Again, appreciate your input.
 

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I've used pour on epoxy a couple times. I also had a lot of bubbles. A butane torch on low held back about 10" and just dusted over the surface worked for me. I've read that it's the CO2 that draws out the bubbles. You definitely are not trying to get the epoxy hot, just blowing the exhaust over the surface.

I briefly tried using a torch, but with my history of blowing things up, I was too scared to give it a thorough going over. Flashbacks of detonating my shirt, pants and shoes lighting firecrackers or singeing off my eyebrows, mustache and beard when starting my woodstove
won't leave me alone.
 

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I briefly tried using a torch, but with my history of blowing things up, I was too scared to give it a thorough going over. Flashbacks of detonating my shirt, pants and shoes lighting firecrackers or singeing off my eyebrows, mustache and beard when starting my woodstove
won't leave me alone.
Well, your loss, what with learning your lesson and all that. I used a hair dryer once, too. It worked but just took a lot longer - for the epoxy, not to blow my ass up.
 

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turning small branches of hickory and sanding 'em smooth creates a solid, hard and pleasant feeling club. It is just wood, but it is exceptionally cool. fabricated exclusively outdoors from sunlight, carbon dioxide, h2o and dirt. turned 'em and shaved off a bit and sanded what was left and it is beautiful.
 

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Well, your loss, what with learning your lesson and all that. I used a hair dryer once, too. It worked but just took a lot longer - for the epoxy, not to blow my ass up.


yea, getting your old backside blown to kingdom come ain't much fun. i tried a blow dryer but saw no bubbles pop. i bought more and plan to try a few new approaches. if i could get it to produce the finish it is famous for, it will be worth the money. it adds a dimension, a beautiful one, to the right surface. i'd like to use it on my car's paint! some day soon, car paint jobs will be works of art. the same old, same old solid colors will become ancient history. personalized, hand painted scenery or logos or portraits, quotes, designs, you name it, will become the rage. no two cars will look the same.
 

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I've used the same stuff and used a propane torch on the bubbles...no issues.
 

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Maybe I'll try again. How far from the product did you keep the torch? The stuff isn't flammable, so that's a +.

Thanks ChiknNutz:smile:
Don't say that. It'll burn if you make it :)

I held the tip of the flame off about 6" from the material. The flame itself was about 3" long, so about 9-10" from material to torch head. Keep it moving...
 

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Cat Herder
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I have a trigger on my torch so instant on, instant off. I just hit it quick, little bursts is all you need. If you do keep it on for any length of time, do NOT hold it in the same place for any appreciable length of time or you will burn it.

The first few times I did this I was so impressed with how the bubble simply vanish. My experience is that you have to babysit this for about half an hour while the stuff thickens up to the point that the bubbles can no longer rise, as there are almost always some air trapped in the cracks that continue to off-gas.
 
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