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Hello everyone,

I am having trouble setting up my table, so that im able to stand up my board to the fence. The cut that i need to make while the board is on the table, is no problem.. its when i go to make the matching cut that i run into problems.. so far, ive altered my fence so theres minimal gaps in front and behind the bit (see pic).. is there any advice for getting my part/board more steady for a more accurate cut??

It would be easier if i were needing to cut something that is more than 3 inches wide.. however.. im building a small box, and the piece is 3/4 x 2.5 x 5.5.

Thank you


Josh
 

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Pain in the A$$
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I had this same problem so I abandoned the project, but I still have the bit. I'm curious as to what others suggest.

Mark
 

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If your fence had a ZCI opening for the bit, you could accomplish the cut on a piece that narrow. If I were using your fence, I'd make the end cuts on at least a 4" piece and rip to size. Or twice what you need (plus kerf), then rip 2 pieces.

A ZCI for a router bit can be made by sawing an opening slightly smaller than the bit's profile. Then loosen the fence and position the opening, centered in front of the bit. Snug the RH side of the fence and with the bit at full speed, slowly pivot the fence through the bit. To avoid tear-out, I clamp a 2 X 4 to the fence while it's being swung .

With your fence, you could also sister clamp some scrap, but since you haven't done this already, I wouldn't recommend it as it's something that I don't believe I'm capable of explaining with words.

Good luck, you'll get it....
 

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Someone else had the same issue last week and asked for some pix of my setup. I was away and didn't get any pix until today and now, cannot find that thread. Hopefully he is looking at this one too, as the issues are the same.

Here's a pic of a setup block (not necessary, but prevents test cuts), and the bit buried in it's cutout.



Horizontal piece, usually an end, just like a half-blind DT jig, lays flat.
This bit is a 45 degree miter bit with a locking feature added. Look closely here and you will see the top and bottom of the bit is lined up with the workpiece edges. Now note the top of the bit is in-line with the fence.


Cutting the side piece (vertical, like a half blind DT jig), supported against the tall fence and by a riding top clamp. I cut all but the very hardest wood in one pass. For 2 passes, there would be a second 1/4" hardboard fence face clamped to this one. Note the backing scrap on RH side that prevents chip out, and the whole thing is pushed pass the cutter using the rubber faced grout float. Once upon a time, I used an L shaped jig to push the piece and now I use a large carrier jig for very small stock. When the horizontal relationship is correct, the vertical relationship will be too.



The 2 pieces of scrap.




Fence pic. Also used for slot cutters and drawer lock bit (my personal favorite)

 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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In the book, "In the Craftsman Style" (Taunton Press), around page 131 or 132 there are very good instructions for setting up and using the bit. (It's all off the top of my head so don't flame me too bad.)
 

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http://www.woodsmithstore.com/w1201.html

This book is inexpensive and among other useful things contains an article "Mastering Lock Miter Bits"

Use the code on the back of the book to download a free lock miter bit troubleshooting guide.
 
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