Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys I have decided to follow in my father and grandfathers footsteps and take up woodworking as a hobby. I just purchased a 187 year old house and have plans on doing some work around here (after plenty of practice). I'm 27 and have basic woodworking skills for the time being (mostly construction carpentry like framing and deck building). I have basic tools (an old Shop Smith, bandsaw, miter saw, oscillating spindle sander, old shaper, small 1/4" router, belt/disc combo sander, and various common hand tools). I inherit all of my fathers old tools as he gets new ones. I have access to all of my fathers tools (planers, lathes, you name it, he has it) but I would prefer to do things on my own. My questions lies with my shaper. I just got it and have been messing around with it. Its an old craftsman 1/2hp, 1/2" shaper. Its in excellent shape, but grossly underpowered and the 1/2" spindle limits what I can do. My dad ( who is a retired machinist as well) has motors laying around so I was thinking about upgrading the motor to maybe 1.5-3hp. I was also thinking about using bushings so I can use 3/4" cutters. Would this work for me? I know I need to keep in mind that its still only a 1/2" spindle so i cant get crazy with the size of the cutters. Thanks in advance.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,304 Posts
the 1/2"spindle is the issue

....... Its an old craftsman 1/2hp, 1/2" shaper. Its in excellent shape, but grossly underpowered and the 1/2" spindle limits what I can do. My dad ( who is a retired machinist as well) has motors laying around so I was thinking about upgrading the motor to maybe 1.5-3hp. I was also thinking about using bushings so I can use 3/4" cutters. Would this work for me? I know I need to keep in mind that its still only a 1/2" spindle so i cant get crazy with the size of the cutters. Thanks in advance.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Shaper-Cutter-Glue-Joint-1-2-Bore/C2014
I have the same old shaper, with a 1 HP craftsman motor. I have a few cutters for it, but I have a glue joint cutter in it now and probably "forever"... :laughing: It's just too small for "serious" woodworking, but within it's limits it will be fine to start out. Watch your RPMs, too slow is worse than too fast. It think it may have 2 speeds.... I can't recall. The RPMs depend on the cutter diameter.
See the speed recommendations for each cutter.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Shaper-Cutter-1-Straight-1-2-Bore/C2007
Grizzly sells a few 1/2" bore cutters and you can always use a bushing in 3/4" bore, but I would not invest much money in those cutters for now. A router table and a 3HP router has all but replaced the small shapers. The variable speed routers allow for different diameter cutters from 1/4" to 2 1`/2" OD. A shaper will have 2 speeds generally 7000 RPM or 10,000 RPM and the smaller cutters like to turn at 18,000 to 22,000 RPMs ....so they are not really compatible for use in shapers. :no:
 

·
Really underground garage
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Ours has a "bead" cutter that stays in it.That profile gets used so much that it's a laziness/convenience thing.Mighty nice to just walk over and hit the switch,haha.Don't even know what it's motor HP is?But it dosen't require much on these small cutters.

Just a side note on these C-man shapers.The whole motor plate/deck thing(not to be confused with the top),can be rotated 180*.Putting motor in front...instead of factory's position in back.

Looking at the tools footprint in "plan view",it cuts down the size by almost half.It also frees up space for DC fittings and whatnot,right where motor USED to be.Puts motor in front for easier maintenance and elec. controls,yadayada.

Just sayin....it's like their engineering dept went on a vacation midway through the design.When they returned,from wherever?.....maybe too much Scotch or umbrella drinks?....anyway,they had all the castings made,but then reversed the motor's orientation.In effect making this shaper's footprint waaaay larger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,405 Posts
If you are serious about getting into woodworking I would keep my eye out for a commercial shaper that was 3hp or more. Instead of using little three wing cutters you could use a collar with bar steel you can grind your own designs to make your own moldings. It would give you the capibility to match some molding that may not be available. The steel comes in various widths and 24" long you cut off what you need.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top