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I need to join two 3/4 inch thick oak pieces that are 7 inches wide and 30 inches long. I am using this for a toy box. Can I just use wood glue and glue the edges together? I have titebond 3. Are there clamps at hardware stores that would help keep them aligned? I always try to search before asking but the search function on this site doesnt seem to work very well for me.
 

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Yes, the only reason people use biscuits for glue ups is for alignment. They offer no extra strength for long glue ups, so just apply a small even amount of glue to each edge and clamp it up.
 

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Old School
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I need to join two 3/4 inch thick oak pieces that are 7 inches wide and 30 inches long. I am using this for a toy box. Can I just use wood glue and glue the edges together? I have titebond 3. Are there clamps at hardware stores that would help keep them aligned? I always try to search before asking but the search function on this site doesnt seem to work very well for me.

Just about any clamp that will handle the width will work. All you need is just glue. Using cauls will keep the boards flat. Cauls are nothing more than a straight edge used on edge clamped across the boards. You should start with the mating edges be jointed to be 90 deg to the face. Alternate the cross clamps from top of boards to the bottom so you don't have clamps on just one side.










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Are there any jigs or tools that will help me keep the boards flat and aligned? I dont really want to buy a biscuit joiner but if it would help I might be able to find a used one. I have a router and table, tables saw, dado blades. Any tips would be appreciated.
 

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Scotty D
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Are there any jigs or tools that will help me keep the boards flat and aligned? I dont really want to buy a biscuit joiner but if it would help I might be able to find a used one. I have a router and table, tables saw, dado blades. Any tips would be appreciated.

I don't use biscuits.

I use cauls, as mentioned above. :smile:
 

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where's my table saw?
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What he said

again...;)
 

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I Actually Tested It

I've been reading this forum for a several years and have read many posts by Cabinet Man indicating there's no need for biscuits, etc. when edge-glueing boards. So I discontinued my use of biscuits. Some time later, when my neighbor asked me about the strength of edge-glued boards, I searched through my scrap pile and found a cut-off end of a large panel I had glued up for a desk top. I leaned it up on a couple 2X4's and asked the neighbor to try to break the glue joint by stomping it with his foot. Guess what,,,,,,,,,, the wood actually broke along the grain and the glue joint held. It's true,,,,,,,,, a glue joint is really stronger than wood. Thanks, Cabinet Man.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm not questioning strength but I took 3 flat boards and made a nice big cupped board. I have no skills but need flat wood.
 

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Did you use the cauls? Also, it's important that the edges taking the glue are at 90-degrees to the top and bottom of the boards. Anything else and the resulting glue-up will not be flat from board to board.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I didnt. I used the clamps I bought. I have been looking around and there is guy that built a pretty neat jig to use to end glue boards. I'm going to cut the panel apart and start over.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Maybe this?

I didnt. I used the clamps I bought. I have been looking around and there is guy that built a pretty neat jig to use to end ( I think you meant edge) glue boards. I'm going to cut the panel apart and start over.
This is simple to make and costs under $10.00. Two hardwood 1 x 2's with a rabbet and holes drilled to just enter the rabbet for the Redi Rods. That keeps the pressure close to the center of the boards, rather than springing them open and causing "cup".
Put some tape over the threads where the glues drips out to save cleaning the threads afterward. A couple of clamps right on the glue joint at each end will line the boards up pretty well. I made 3 in different widths and lengths. Pretty handy :thumbsup: bill
 

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Discussion Starter #16
This is simple to make and costs under $10.00. Two hardwood 1 x 2's with a rabbet and holes drilled to just enter the rabbet for the Redi Rods. That keeps the pressure close to the center of the boards, rather than springing them open and causing "cup".
Put some tape over the threads where the glues drips out to save cleaning the threads afterward. A couple of clamps right on the glue joint at each end will line the boards up pretty well. I made 3 in different widths and lengths. Pretty handy :thumbsup: bill
Nice bookmatched boards. Do you have a side shot of that clamp?
 

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that clamping jig is cool but first you really need to get your edges square, and boards flat. even a fraction of a degree out of square will be obvious once the panel is full width. do a search for how to edge joint with your router table (you didn't mention having a jointer). better yet grab an old bailey #7 from a flea market or ebay and step into a whole new world! :thumbsup:

also, with cauls you can clamp a cupped board flat but once the clamps come off it will just spring back. one slightly cupped board in the middle of a glued panel can make it look like the whole panel is cupped. check the entire width with a 12" steel ruler to find the flat/non flat areas.

any clamps will do as long as they reach across the panel. alternate them top/bottom like cabinetman said. you can even screw/clamp scrap boards to a bench along each edge of the panel and apply pressure with opposed wedges. if everything is flat and square you don't need a lot of pressure.
 

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Joining boards together is easy when the correct technique is used. Everyone has their own way of doing it that works for them. Most learn from trial and error (mostly error). It sounds like you need to take a class in basic woodworking. You will learn faster when you see someone else do it first and then can practice on scrap and have an instructor watch to see what you are doing and point out your mistakes. If you have a friend or neighbor who does woodworking ask them to show you. Good luck.
 
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