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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying a new years resolution of buying the tool I'd like first instead of spending more money and time buying cheap and working my way up.

Will take longer to buy tools but instead of buying stuff that will get (more less) thrown out, buying stuff that can get passed on to children's children.

If you were to do it over again, would you go with an extended stroke drill press or is it a waste of money.

Any help with the decision would be appreciated.

The drill presses in particular I'm looking at are

General 17" 75-200


Swing 17” (432 mm) Drilling capacity 3/4” (19 mm) Chuck size
5/8” (16 mm) keyless Spindle travel 3 1/4” (82.5 mm) Spindle distance to table 25 1/2” (647 mm) Spindle distance to base 48” (1220 mm) Table size 12” x 12” (305 x 305 mm) Column diameter 3 1/8” (79.5 mm) Spindle speeds (12) 340 - 2800 RPM Spindle taper MT2 Overall height 64 1/2” (1638 mm) Base size 11 3/4” x 19 5/8” (302 x 500 mm) Motor 3/4 HP, 110 V, 1 Ph, 12 A Weight 200 LBS (91 kg)

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General 17" 75-260


Swing 16 15/16” (430 mm) Drilling capacity 3/4” (19 mm) Chuck size
3/4” (19 mm) Spindle travel (STROKE) 6” (152 mm) Spindle distance to table 23 3/4” (605 mm) Spindle distance to base 44 1/2” (1130 mm) Table size 14” x 14” (355 x 355 mm) Column diameter 3 1/8” (79.5 mm) Spindle speeds (12) 255 - 2750 RPM Spindle taper MT3 Overall height 68” (1730 mm) Base size 11 3/4” x 19 5/8” (302 x 500 mm) Motor 1 HP, 110/220 V, 12.5/6.25 A Weight 229 LBS (104 kg)
 

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If I was choosing I would go 6inch just because there is that one time you'll need it and not have it.
 

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RAM Man
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+1 on Paarkers' comment and also because I've never been a big fan of keyless chucks.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Sorry. I would go with keyed option with the smaller press
Same here because the less the quill extends the less run out and better holes. Especially when drilling for dowels.

There is one other consideration about the chuck. How small of a bit will it hold? In woodworking you really need one that goes down to 1/16".

The machinists here can help out but I thought that the Morse Taper #2 was the more common one used in drill presses. You can always get another chuck or two and attach a MT2. (1/16 and keyed)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
rrich said:
Same here because the less the quill extends the less run out and better holes. Especially when drilling for dowels. There is one other consideration about the chuck. How small of a bit will it hold? In woodworking you really need one that goes down to 1/16". The machinists here can help out but I thought that the Morse Taper #2 was the more common one used in drill presses. You can always get another chuck or two and attach a MT2. (1/16 and keyed)
Found out that it will hold down to 1/32nd
 

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Same here because the less the quill extends the less run out and better holes. Especially when drilling for dowels.

There is one other consideration about the chuck. How small of a bit will it hold? In woodworking you really need one that goes down to 1/16".

The machinists here can help out but I thought that the Morse Taper #2 was the more common one used in drill presses. You can always get another chuck or two and attach a MT2. (1/16 and keyed)
Good chucks are usually sold without the arbors so it is just a matter of getting the arbor to fit the chuck and the spindle, both MT2 and MT3 are available.
Minimum bit size will vary on manufacturer and model of chuck, my drill press came with a 0.13 min. 5/8 max chuck, I replaced it with a 0.06 min. 5/8 max.
Another alternative is to pick up a 1/4" capacity quick connect chuck sold for impact drivers and use it for small bits.
I would think runout on the first 3 or so inches would be same on either drill so can't see that as a limiting factor, preferably there should be little on either.
 

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An aside, there are chucks available that will grip the smallest of wire sized bits. They have a 1/4" extension that is inserted in the DP's chuck. They are sold to scrollers to drill tiny blade holes. Mine came with an assortment of wire sized bits.
 

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I bought my drill press specifically because it had 6" of travel. I needed to drill through 4x4 lumber in one operation. I've never regretted that decision.
 

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If money is not an issue, it is a no brainer. Go with the extra 1/4hp and the longer travel. The smaller one will be adequate 98% of the time but you will regret it that other 2% of the time.
However I got a nearly new 3/4hp drill with 4" of travel essentially new for 20% of retail and am perfectly happy with it.
 
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