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Issue 1:
Any advice on best way to patch the damaged corner of this veneered credenza. Plan to finish with watco danish oil. Have read different things on wood filler vs wood putty.

Issue 2:
I stripped the finish of the credenza initially with acetone but the lacquer was so thick it was taking forever. Decided to give citistrip a try and was surprised to find that on one side it seemed to have leach out the natural color of the wood on one side of the credenza. There are two pictures, one without flash and one with flash. The one with flash really dramatizes what happened. Will this be a non-issue once the veneer is carefully sanded and then finished with danish oil?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Old School
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Issue 1:
Any advice on best way to patch the damaged corner of this veneered credenza. Plan to finish with watco danish oil. Have read different things on wood filler vs wood putty.
I would fit in a new piece of veneer, cut to look like grain continuation.

Issue 2:
I stripped the finish of the credenza initially with acetone but the lacquer was so thick it was taking forever. Decided to give citistrip a try and was surprised to find that on one side it seemed to have leach out the natural color of the wood on one side of the credenza. There are two pictures, one without flash and one with flash. The one with flash really dramatizes what happened. Will this be a non-issue once the veneer is carefully sanded and then finished with danish oil?

Thanks in advance.
The stripper took off some finish and color, and only brings back the original wood. It may need staining to get the color you want.






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Probably the easiest fix would be to machine a strip of the wood out with a router and insert a new piece of veneer. If that isn't an option you could fill it with wood putty lighter than the wood color it to the lighter color of the wood with artist oil paints. Then seal it and purchase a graining pen and draw the wood grain back on it. This takes considerable practice and may take a lot of tinkering to get the colors right but can be done. It's similar to what a touch up person would do with burn it sticks filling a place like that didn't merit actually fixing it.
 
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