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I am building my first cabinet with drawers.

I did a test run with the 1st drawer by setting it in the cabinet and attempted to place the drawer slides next to it in order to confirm the fit. Turns out I made my first drawer too wide (I am sure many of you are not surprised.) To address this I shaved off a side of the drawer. Now it looks like I took off too much. The drawer is already glued together, but I did not yet attach the front. Everything is made out of 3/4" (19mm) 7 layer birch plywood.

I figure this is a "just take your medicine" kind of situation and I need to just rebuild the drawer.

If you have advise about not rebuilding the drawer I am all ears, or if you have advise for the second attempt I am open to that too.

I was also thinking I would assemble the next attempt with pocket holes, confirm proper installation, and then take it apart and glue it. That way if I make it too big again I could just take the drawer apart and trim the necessary pieces, then reassemble and test again, repeating until it fits right.
 

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Mike
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I'm in the take your medicine and rebuild it camp.
I would not use pocket screws to assemble. Drawers take a lot of abuse and need proper joinery.
I would at least use a drawer lock joint. They are easily made on the table saw or router table.
I prefer dovetails for drawers.
Most full extension drawer slides are 1/2 inch thick. Measure yours to confirm. That would mean you need to make your drawer 1" narrower than your opening.
 

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I am building my first cabinet with drawers.

I did a test run with the 1st drawer by setting it in the cabinet and attempted to place the drawer slides next to it in order to confirm the fit. Turns out I made my first drawer too wide (I am sure many of you are not surprised.) To address this I shaved off a side of the drawer. Now it looks like I took off too much. The drawer is already glued together, but I did not yet attach the front. Everything is made out of 3/4" (19mm) 7 layer birch plywood.

I figure this is a "just take your medicine" kind of situation and I need to just rebuild the drawer.

If you have advise about not rebuilding the drawer I am all ears, or if you have advise for the second attempt I am open to that too.

I was also thinking I would assemble the next attempt with pocket holes, confirm proper installation, and then take it apart and glue it. That way if I make it too big again I could just take the drawer apart and trim the necessary pieces, then reassemble and test again, repeating until it fits right.

Unless you provide drawer and opening dimensions there is no way to answer your question.


George
 

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I assume that you are using side mounted ball bearing drawer slides. If so, and your drawer is too narrow you could add a shims to the walls of the cabinet where the slides attach.
You didn't say if the drawer front overlaps the cabinet opening or inserts into it so just size it to fit.
Usually a good idea to buy your slides before constructing your drawer and cabinet so you will know what their dimensions need to be in order to accommodate the slides. Same is true for cabinet door hinges......buy them first and then build the doors.
Drawers that will use ball bearing slides don't need to be super strong because they will move without a lot of force due to the ball bearings.
Ball bearing slides will specify the required side clearance between drawer and cabinet but some are a little more forgiving than others.
Best to have all sizing and measurement info before you start construction and build the cabinet and drawers once........don't build and rebuild multiple times.
 

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Better rebuilding new drawer. Better not using pocket screws. Dovetails or drawer lock joint by Pretender are making better drawers. If keeping old drawer, is gap small? If yes, you try gluing thin spacers between slides and drawer. Slide screws will penetrating spacer and drawer. Ok not great.
 

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Unless things have changed since I was building, the drawers need to be 1 inch narrower than the opening. I will say a lot has changed since then though, so it would be best to check the manuf online before building your drawers.
 

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Interested Observer
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If this is for shop drawers or the like I would just shim under one or several of the screw holes on the slides with a layer or several of tape or thinnest flat/fender washers I could find and take the lesson. If it was a good cabinet (piece of furniture, a built in or a kitchen cabinet) I would remake it.


Slow down. Measure twice or even several times. Build it to fit. Make sure things are parallel. Use shims or spacer blocks to make the 2 sides the same.


Good luck
 

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Unless your using undermount slides it almost always requires exactly 1" of space for side mounted drawer slides. Not 15/16 or 1 1/8. Aim for 1" narrower than the opening. What kind of joinery did you use on your first attempt? Butt joints?
 

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If you are using full extension ball bearing slides that attach to each side of the inside walls, there are expansion tabs that you should be using to fasten to the wall.
That way if your drawer happens to be too narrow, the slides will adjust out.
Shimming is another good solution
If you are a 1/4" off, you might get away with just shimming one side.
Anything bigger and I would put equal sized shims on each side.

i wouldn't think you would have to rebuild unless you really took off too much.
 

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HI,


I used to mess up on my design measurement a lot. After a few really expensive mistakes, I started using woodworking design software like SketchUp. It lets you design your project on your computer before you make it in real life. There are a few different ones out there, but they pretty much all do the same thing.
 
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