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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an older powermatic with a dozen or so blades(mainly resaw blades and 3/8 blades) I'm gonna be looking into some 1/4 and 1/8 blades for boxes. Is there a standard blade length for a 14" saw? I keep coming up with 93&1/2".
 

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93 1/2" is the standard size for 14" saws without a riser. Get a dressmakers fabric measuring tape and measure your saw around the wheels. These tapes are great for measuring around circles and shapes. 1/8" blades are easy to break if cutting thicker stock, better for 1/4" thick work in hardwoods, up to 1/2" in softwood. Make some straight in relief cuts whenever you can so you aren't putting too much pressure on blades when cutting tight shapes, places like transitions, apex of curves and such. Try to learn to use the bandsaw without putting side pressure on the blade as you cut. If operating correctly, you should be able to let go of the work and not have it move. As a former instructor, I found it common for students to force the bandsaw, it's easy to do, dulls the blade and often breaks it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
93 1/2" is the standard size for 14" saws without a riser. Get a dressmakers fabric measuring tape and measure your saw around the wheels. These tapes are great for measuring around circles and shapes. 1/8" blades are easy to break if cutting thicker stock, better for 1/4" thick work in hardwoods, up to 1/2" in softwood. Make some straight in relief cuts whenever you can so you aren't putting too much pressure on blades when cutting tight shapes, places like transitions, apex of curves and such. Try to learn to use the bandsaw without putting side pressure on the blade as you cut. If operating correctly, you should be able to let go of the work and not have it move. As a former instructor, I found it common for students to force the bandsaw, it's easy to do, dulls the blade and often breaks it.
Much appreciated!
 

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When it comes to tpi, at least 3 teeth and less than 12 teeth engaged in cutting. More TPI gives a smoother but slower cut. Fewer TPI allows for a faster cut with a slightly rougher cut surface. Thin = high TPI and Thick = low TPI.
 
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