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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DISCLAIMER - I'm a complete beginner in woodworking. I will work only with manpowered hand tools (except maybe for the circular saw).

I want to make a woodworking bench. But in my country it's very hard to find any boards thicker than 2-3 inch. 2 inch thick boards would mean alot of hand planing to glue them together properly for a circa 3 or more inch benchtop.

But today I found this boards: http://www.bolha.com/kmetijstvo-goz...les-hrastov--1286941040.html?aclct=1370885142

It's a 100 years old oak, thick 4.7 (12 cm) (some boards are less).

So,

Would that kind of wood (considering its age) plane well?

That old boards won't twist much, could I just saw them as wide as I can and with that reduce the amount of planing I would need to do on the sides?

Any other thoughts on wood selection? Should I just go with some thiner boards, where I can be more selective of the wood quality?

Thanks alot!
 

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Those boards look purity sweet to work with hand planes an I don't think you can go wrong with them, I used European Beach, Mackory, Mangonoy, Hard Maple an Ash burl for mine, the Inlays are mostly Walnut an Maple
 

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@BC, that bench is sick. Go home! =)

@S7NF, those boards are killer. Even if it takes you longer to plane them down correctly, I think you would end up with a very worthy workbench. I would cut them down to rough size then plane out the gaps then glue the boards up. Then flatten the top.
 

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:laughing::laughing::laughing: Yes its one of my work benches
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@BC, that bench is sick. Go home! =)

@S7NF, those boards are killer. Even if it takes you longer to plane them down correctly, I think you would end up with a very worthy workbench. I would cut them down to rough size then plane out the gaps then glue the boards up. Then flatten the top.
How wide is considered safe to cut them (to prevent wood twsting through the years later) ?

@bigcouger
Whoah, nice :eek:
 

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4 to 5 inches is good go wider will depend what you use to seal the wood with, if you seal the wood all the way around you want have a problem at all, an keep it out of the weather there, where are you exactly ?????
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The bench will be stored in the basement of a house (normal air conditions). I'm from Slovenia btw.

I don't know anything about sealants. I was reading something about top coat finishes like shellac, linseed oil, danish oil, ... But that's not the same thing right? What would I, in general, need to do?
 

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The bench will be stored in the basement of a house (normal air conditions). I'm from Slovenia btw.

I don't know anything about sealants. I was reading something about top coat finishes like shellac, linseed oil, danish oil, ... But that's not the same thing right? What would I, in general, need to do?
Can use Boiled Linseed Oil , or Danish Oil but will work great for you there an you can go wider to max size since it going to be in a stable environment
 
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