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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all -

I've been perusing my favorite tool shop (CL) for miter saws. Figured I'd add one to the shop if I can find a decent price on one in good shape.

My question is for those who have use a 10" vs. 12", other that the obvious advantage of the larger cut capacity of the 12", is there any other benefits.

I read in a thread somewhere here in the forum that someone was have a little issue with some "deflection" I guess you could call it with the 12" blade. Wasn't quite able to tell if that was blade type specific or if it was a common issue due to the larger diameter.

I know there is a cost difference, but that aside, if you had to choose between same brand, just 10" vs. 12", what would you do?

Hope this is too broad of a question, just trying to stimulate some discussion points for me to learn from.

Thanks in advance!
 

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A 10" will allow you to use thin kerf blades and not be concerned about deflection. To eliminate deflection risk with a 12" you have to go to a regular kerf. Plus 10" blades are cheaper, obviously.
Not much difference between the 2 beyond cutting ability, footprint, and weight.
 

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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #3
A 10" will allow you to use thin kerf blades and not be concerned about deflection. To eliminate deflection risk with a 12" you have to go to a regular kerf. Plus 10" blades are cheaper, obviously.
Not much difference between the 2 beyond cutting ability, footprint, and weight.
Is there an advan try age of thin kerk blades on a miter saw?
 

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<<Is there an advantage of thin kerf blades on a miter saw? >>

Just the normal one - saws with marginal power cut hardwood better with a thin kerf blade. Full kerf blades require more power. Since most, if not all miter saws are 120V, I wold think that they would pretty much all need thin kerf blades for cutting hardwoods. Also, a little less stock is wasted with a thin blade.

I agree with rbk123 on the deflection issue. A 12" blade is more likely to deflect if it hits a knot or defect. Since I'm concerned with accurate miters when I make furniture, when I bought a miter saw I specifically went with a 10" model.

Bill
 

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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #5
<<Is there an advantage of thin kerf blades on a miter saw? >>

Just the normal one - saws with marginal power cut hardwood better with a thin kerf blade. Full kerf blades require more power. Since most, if not all miter saws are 120V, I wold think that they would pretty much all need thin kerf blades for cutting hardwoods. Also, a little less stock is wasted with a thin blade.

I agree with rbk123 on the deflection issue. A 12" blade is more likely to deflect if it hits a knot or defect. Since I'm concerned with accurate miters when I make furniture, when I bought a miter saw I specifically went with a 10" model.

Bill
Good info. I will use this in my search. Thanks.
 

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I started out with a 10" then decided to hand 5" crown and had to buy a 12". For me I'd get a 12" every time or if they make one a sliding 10". For the price it's worth the extra 2".
 

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John
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+1 on the sliding 10":thumbsup:
 

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Woodenboat Builder
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Your specific uses will determine what size you need so our suggestions are going to be based on what we use one for. With that in mind, I find myself wishing that I had bought a 12" about once a month when I am trying to cut something that just doesn't quite fit the 10" that I have. I think a sliding 10" would get me by most of the time, but occasionally I'd still be needing that little extra. Plus I'm a bit spoiled from having used a 14" for many years :)
 

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I have a 10 inch one now, my next one will definitely be a 12. Mainly because my 10 inch won't cut a 4 by 4 all the way through.
 

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You've gotten sound advice from RBK, Dodgeboy and others. I've been a strong supporter of good quality thin kerf blades for smaller 10" table saws, because of the excellent results I got using the better examples....never an issue, and quality is on par with full kerf blades if you pick a good one. I'm less enthusiastic about 12" TK's because it has 20% larger span than a 10" and is therefore more likely to deflect if the blade width is the same. Crosscutting is easier on the saws than ripping, so even though a 10" TK is easier to spin on a CMS or SCMS (or any saw) than a full kerf, there is less need and less incentive to use a TK blade for crosscutting. A 12" TK can and does work, but it will have more deflection than a 10" TK if all else is equal in the equation....it's just a matter of physics

My suggestion is to use a FK for 12" blades if possible....if you stumble into a great deal on a great 12" TK and just gotta buy it (...I know the feeling! :huh:), just be more patient and the let blade do the work. The recommendation is less critical for a 10" crosscut blade....go with the best deal on the highest quality most suitable blade, and/or consider if it's a blade that you might also use on your TS and figure that into the equation too. If your blade is for a slider or a RAS, be sure to look for a blade with a low positive to negative hook angle regardless of kerf or diameter (~ negative to + 5° or so). Hook angle is less critical on a non-sliding CMS/straight chop saws...positive hook angles of +10° to upwards of even + 15° of or ok (lower hook is fine also). Your TS blade is best off with some positive hook angle.
 

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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #11
So what's in a name??

Thanks guys for the discussion. I have not seen a sliding 10" that fits within my CL budget, but have found a 12" Dewalt DW715 that does. Amazon has a couple of 10" Hitachi's for less than $150 w/ free shipping for Prime member like myself. Somewhere in here, I believe the Hitachi's got some good reviews.

In terms of usage, I am not quite sure of all my planned usage, another reason I opened this discussion. I can't see me needing it that much at this time to justify buying a sliding saw that are upwards of $400 for a quality name brand. Maybe I am putting too much stock in a name? Not sure how much that matters when it comes to a miter saw.

If it is anything wider that a 12" capacity, I would imagine that I could just use a circular saw. In my minimum woodworking projects, I have not run into a "need" for one, just deal shopping on CL and thought I would look into it.

Again thanks for sharing your thoughts. Hopefully others are learning from this as well.
 

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That's what I plan on doing also. Instead of a 12 inch slider, I am just going to get a regular 12 inch. Anything wider, I will just use my cross cut sled on my tablesaw.
 

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I too have been steadily watching CL with no success. Today I was looking at my Home Depot online and noticed a 12" Dewalt 718 sliding miter for $399. They still had 2 of the Black Friday 2012 saws in the back. Thats $200 cheaper than the 780 Dewalt. Needless to say I grabbed one.
 

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Thanks guys for the discussion. I have not seen a sliding 10" that fits within my CL budget, but have found a 12" Dewalt DW715 that does. Amazon has a couple of 10" Hitachi's for less than $150 w/ free shipping for Prime member like myself. Somewhere in here, I believe the Hitachi's got some good reviews.

In terms of usage, I am not quite sure of all my planned usage, another reason I opened this discussion. I can't see me needing it that much at this time to justify buying a sliding saw that are upwards of $400 for a quality name brand. Maybe I am putting too much stock in a name? Not sure how much that matters when it comes to a miter saw.

If it is anything wider that a 12" capacity, I would imagine that I could just use a circular saw. In my minimum woodworking projects, I have not run into a "need" for one, just deal shopping on CL and thought I would look into it.

Again thanks for sharing your thoughts. Hopefully others are learning from this as well.
I was in exactly the same boat as you, and had mostly the same questions and dilemmas.

I ended up getting the Hitachi C10FCE2 10" Compound Miter Saw, a 10 inch, non-slider. Why? It has great reviews and is highly regarded. It was inexpensive. It makes most cuts I need to make, including 4x4 lumber. For crosscuts of bigger/wider lumber, I'll use my circular saw, jigs and my patience.
 

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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #15
I was in exactly the same boat as you, and had mostly the same questions and dilemmas.

I ended up getting the Hitachi C10FCE2 10" Compound Miter Saw, a 10 inch, non-slider. Why? It has great reviews and is highly regarded. It was inexpensive. It makes most cuts I need to make, including 4x4 lumber. For crosscuts of bigger/wider lumber, I'll use my circular saw, jigs and my patience.
I saw that one on Amazon for $125. That dewalt I mentioned is being sold for $150 OBO. That why I was looking to you guys for some comparisons.

I think my interest in a miter saw comes from a visualization of convenience not necessity. Obviously there are some cuts that are done much more safely on a miter saw than a table saw pending on stock material being cuts, but I guess there are other ways as well.

Today being an example. Made a little box for my wife to place paper scrapes in for her hobby. Used some ply and made some miter corners. Would have been simple on a miter saw. Instead, I made a zero clearance insert on the table saw set at a 45 degree angle. Worked out pretty good but took a lot longer than necessary. I guess the good thing is that I do have a new insert setup. Although my saw gave me a little concern.

LOL, Sounds like I am talking myself out of purchasing one - :no: - I will still look and will probably get one soon if this bug continues.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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I have a DeWalt 708, SCMS and double bevel. The blade that I use is a 12" (Thinner kerf but how thin is ???) Marples. It is the more tooth one than is carried by Lowe's.

Almost all of my cross cutting is done on this saw. I have done crown molding with this saw.

This saw will cut about 12" at 90°. I've had the saw about 8 or 10 years and no complaints other than an infant mortality problem. (I learned how bad "factory service" can be.)

There are so many cuts that are in the almost 12" range that I do and it saves the hassle of a cross cut sled.

OK. here is what and why. Get a 12" slider and a bevel. Double bevel is nice but not really necessary and a single bevel is just fine. When doing crown molding, I used a jig shop built and similar to the one that Rockler sells. (The jig requires a lot less thought to make the cuts and I don't do crown professionally.) You need to think more about your work rather than the features of the saw. The big questions are, do you ever expect to do crown molding and how big of a cross cut do you need? Then buy the features that you need.
 
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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #17
Follow-up..thread closer

Hey guy and gals, just wanted to bring this thread to closer and update everyone on my selection. After the help from those on the forum and a little more research, I decided on the 12 inch slider from HF.

Forum member CaptainMarvelous had some good, first person, information and review that made me feel this was a good option.

Thanks everyone for you input on this thread and the others.
 

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John
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Hey guy and gals, just wanted to bring this thread to closer and update everyone on my selection. After the help from those on the forum and a little more research, I decided on the 12 inch slider from HF.

Forum member CaptainMarvelous had some good, first person, information and review that made me feel this was a good option.

Thanks everyone for you input on this thread and the others.
I added that saw to my home repair arsenal a few months ago and have been very pleasantly surprised. It is far more accurate than I expected..... right out of the box even. Just some minor tweaks to set up. It could do with a better blade but I just use it for construction type activities and it works well for that. The main thing I dislike about it is that it is definitely designed for right handers. What I found a bit unusual is that the laser comes down on the right side of the blade. Dead accurate though.
Congratulations and good luck with the acquisition. :smile:
 

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DRTYBYRD
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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I added that saw to my home repair arsenal a few months ago and have been very pleasantly surprised. It is far more accurate than I expected..... right out of the box even. Just some minor tweaks to set up. It could do with a better blade but I just use it for construction type activities and it works well for that. The main thing I dislike about it is that it is definitely designed for right handers. What I found a bit unusual is that the laser comes down on the right side of the blade. Dead accurate though.
Congratulations and good luck with the acquisition. :smile:
Yeah..I am in the process of tweaking it as well and did notice the same thing you mentioned regarding the laser. I made a slight adjustment to mines and it cuts pretty much on the blade line. I saw a video where a fuy modified the laser so that you can control it separate of the saw coming on.

Here's the video...
 

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Hey all -

I've been perusing my favorite tool shop (CL) for miter saws. Figured I'd add one to the shop if I can find a decent price on one in good shape.

My question is for those who have use a 10" vs. 12", other that the obvious advantage of the larger cut capacity of the 12", is there any other benefits.

I read in a thread somewhere here in the forum that someone was have a little issue with some "deflection" I guess you could call it with the 12" blade. Wasn't quite able to tell if that was blade type specific or if it was a common issue due to the larger diameter.

I know there is a cost difference, but that aside, if you had to choose between same brand, just 10" vs. 12", what would you do?

Hope this is too broad of a question, just trying to stimulate some discussion points for me to learn from.

Thanks in advance!
12" no question! I got a Delta 12" several years ago - good choice. Get a better blade, the stock blades are usually junk.

Now I want the sliding type. The PC looks good to me.
 
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