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Discussion Starter #1
Blew up 2 bowls today. 1st was a spalted alder piece that someone gave me at one of my craft shows. Turned the outside, sanded and finished it. Remounted to turn the inside and with about 1/2 of the inside hollowed out the tenon broke in the chuck sending the bowl smashing into the bed of the lathe, breaking it into 4 pieces. Sorry, no pic of that one.

This one is a piece of walnut that had some spalting/sapwood. Small piece came out at the rim. Stopped turning and decided to just sand it. Bigger piece blew out, so sad good enough, just put some finish on. Bigger chunk flew off doing that. So said screw it, grabbed the wood burner and burned the edge and called it done. Put it out at the next show and see if anyone likes it.
 

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SD,
those bowl look like they are thick enough that they shouldn't come apart like that. Are you getting a catch when they blow, or how exactly are you presenting your bowl gouge when this happens and what kind of cut, light, heavy, etc.? Also, was the wood punky in spots at all?
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No catch. The wood was very soft in that spot. Almost like a large knot of sap wood. I used some CA on the out side and thought it was stable. Guess not. :)
 

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Were you putting a bit of pressure on the tool? Whenever the wood is suspect, the glue is a good idea, but make sure the tool is freshly sharpened and take extremely light cuts. Sometimes going to the next smaller size gouge helps too, say 1/2" down to 3/8".
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
On the one that came out of the chuck, it was very punky and I was most likely taking too aggressive a cut. Not really sure on the one in the photo, but again it was a funky piece of wood. Was hoping it would stay together as it would have been a stunning piece.
 

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Ok,
Well, you get the idea. Softer it is, sharper and lighter the cut. That's the only problem with some of the very cool looking spalted wood. Next time, see if you can make an indent with your fingernail without much pressure. If you can, probably too soft. Now you could get it to the point just prior to the pics and really coat it with the thin CA glue, letting it soak into the wood. Let it dry overnight and then finish it. It should stiffen up quite a bit and stay together. If it does break and it's only a few pieces, the nice thing about the spalting is when you glue it back together, it looks like there's just a few more spalt lines in it.
Mike Hawkins;)
 
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