What Tips Do You Have For New Woodworkers? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 05-25-2019, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by mmwood_1 View Post
My suggestion to beginners is regarding tools. Many will say, "get the best you can afford to get". I say, get whatever you can get your hands on, and learn how to use it.

This. Absolutely.
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post #22 of 27 Old 05-25-2019, 09:12 AM
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Practice can be the best teacher.
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post #23 of 27 Old 05-25-2019, 09:20 AM
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One thing you definitely don't want to go cheap on: layout tools. Squares, rules, etc.

Nothing is more frustrating than investing time and money in a project, only to have a joint not line up correctly or be out of square because your tools aren't accurate. A good 12" combination square will cost $75 or more - but it's well worth it.
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post #24 of 27 Old 05-25-2019, 05:07 PM
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Credit card with a high limit.

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post #25 of 27 Old 05-25-2019, 06:09 PM
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Often attributed to Michael Jordan, but may have been written by a Nike as copywriter:

ďIíve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. Iíve lost almost 300 games. 26 times, Iíve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. Iíve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.Ē


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post #26 of 27 Old 05-26-2019, 02:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmishElectricCo View Post
One thing you definitely don't want to go cheap on: layout tools. Squares, rules, etc.

Nothing is more frustrating than investing time and money in a project, only to have a joint not line up correctly or be out of square because your tools aren't accurate. A good 12" combination square will cost $75 or more - but it's well worth it.
It sounds like you've had bad experiences with squares.

I may have just been lucky. I have two combination squares - both the typical Stanley ones. One is a bit off, which for woodworking is absolutely not okay for the reasons you mention. The other one, however, is dead on. I haven't measured it with any precision tools, but it passes the line-flip-line test every time I try.

Scott Wadsworth (The Essential Craftsman) states:

Quote:
"...the key to being a good hand is to understand allowable tollerances. Sometimes if you're working to plus/minus 1/64", you're working way too sloppy. Sometimes, if you're working to plus/minus 2 feet, you're cutting it way too fine." - https://youtu.be/jDfpl1_I904?t=889


If you do a lot of joinery (whether that's fancy stuff or pocket holes) tool setup tolerances ought to be tight so that things naturally square themselves up. So, for the beginning woodworkers, point is: check squareness of tools. Personally I wouldn't jump to a $75 square until I tested a couple dozen $10 ones. If not square, you can return it. It's a square.

Also note: A deck of cards is wildly accurately square, and verifiably so: Take a card, flip it backwards, put it in the middle of the deck, and see if you can pick it out from the rest of the deck. Same would go for cardstock (haven't tested it, but the same test would apply).

Also also note: I think beginners ought to learn how to square/align/parallel their tools properly without squares before they go out and think a $75 square will fix their problems. William NG's video on how to square up a table saw sled fence is an example of that. So, as this thread is for beginning woodworkers, $75 will likely save you some hassle, but the underlying point AmishElectricCo is making is worth repeating: properly square tools will save you more hassle than you realize.
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post #27 of 27 Old 05-26-2019, 10:24 AM
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if you have a project at hand and you read, watch youtube or even on here and you find the consensus of opinion leans one way and then all of a sudden a quick fix appears, be very leery of it. I'm not saying that it it is wrong, but there is a high possibly of it. Just question it.

Also, if you are new at woodworking, dont use the cheapest wood you can find at a lumber yard. It will probably warp or twist and none of your joints will work. When this happens, sometimes you blame yourself because the joints don't fit when in reality the problem is the wood, not you. It's kinda like using an inaccurate rifle, if you miss the target, is it you or is it the gun.

I also don't believe in much practice. Just start out making something useful. Even something simple like a small low book case shelf unit.

Anyway, the main thing is to have fun and not get stressed. This is a great place for help to get you out of a situation and back on track again.

Instead of saying "good luck", i will say "have fun"
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Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Denison, Tx
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