Safety Tips for Working with Table Saws - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 03-27-2017, 03:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
To make a rip on a board with a curved edge use a "straight line rip jig". .....I did that entire stack as fast as I could clamp them, rip them, unclamp them and stack them.
Thanks Woodnthings! I like it. I will have to add this method to my other three methods.

Here are three (3) methods that I use for straightening boards.
1. 12" Jointer with a 84" bed
2. 12' straight edge clamped to my fence. This works on boards that are less than 6' long.
3. Straight edge held to the wood with double-sided tape. The straight edge can be a purchased one or a shop made one.

All four (4) methods have their pros and cons.
Cost: The jointer is the most expensive. #3 is probably the cheapest.

Floor space: The jointer takes up the most floor space, the other three probably can be stored overhead out of the way.

Speed: The jointer is really fast when the board is close to being straight. Woodnthings is probably pretty fast, but the 12' straight edge clamped to the fence is probably just as fast. #3 is probably the slowest, due to the PITA tape.

Length of lumber: The jointer takes just about any length you would like up to 12' or so. #2 only to 6'. #3 only as long as the straight edge. Woodnthings same as #3.

Post your favorite board straightening method to the thread.

Eric

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post #22 of 27 Old 03-28-2017, 12:00 AM
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This is my first post. I'm a fighter jet mechanic for a living and getting into wood working as a hobby. I've been reading and learning here for a while, but just registered. I just wanted to say a quick thanks to woodnthings and everyone else in this thread who take the time to share such great and important information. It's very much appreciated.

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post #23 of 27 Old 04-07-2017, 11:42 AM
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Lee Valley sells a simple clamping arrangement to use an artificial straight edge to square up what I call "bananas." Works really well.
Safety:
1. Do not stand directly in line with the blade. Kick backs are exactly at crotch height. Not quite enough to get me a job with the Geneva Children's Choir.
2. Do not stand directly in line with the blade. I was able to pick the tungsten carbide saw blade tooth out of my forehead just fine.
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post #24 of 27 Old 05-22-2017, 12:31 PM
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Question

@woodnthings: Did that router table come with your saw? If not, did you purchase it specifically for your saw? I ask because I do not want a dedicated router table... I want one built into my saw just like yours and I don't know where to look. Thanks!

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post #25 of 27 Old 05-22-2017, 08:56 PM
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wnt, the three saws can be used to make a huge tablesaw. Lower two of the three blades below the surface and saw away! I worked for a company that sold custom and factory cabinets. Their TS was the size of two pool tables for cutting plywood and boards for custom cabinets.

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post #26 of 27 Old 05-22-2017, 10:53 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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That's exactly what I did here

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
wnt, the three saws can be used to make a huge tablesaw. Lower two of the three blades below the surface and saw away! I worked for a company that sold custom and factory cabinets. Their TS was the size of two pool tables for cutting plywood and boards for custom cabinets.


Maybe you haven't noticed this saw in my avatar, but it is 3 complete table saws, 2 spare tables in between and a router extension table on the far right. I use 3 different fences, Delta Unifence heads on each. One is a sacrifical fence for the dado blade, another is a Peachtree UHM faced fence for the center 50 tooth blade and the Unifence for the 24 tooth rip blade on the left. It's a dream to use and NO blade changes are required. I'm currently making a display case that requires miters, rabbets and rips all done on this Sawzilla......
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Last edited by woodnthings; 05-22-2017 at 11:19 PM.
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post #27 of 27 Old 05-23-2017, 02:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
To make a rip on a board with a curved edge use a "straight line rip jig". A curved edge will not completely register all along the fence and you will end up with a board with a slightly less curved edge. I may also bind and kickback. I made a simple jig using hold down clamps and some 1/4" Masonite to straight line rip curved or live edge boards:
I needed to straight line many, actually dozens of pieces, so I made a "jig" rather than scab on strips each time, which is way too time consuming for me.... "snap on" then rip and "snap off'"...next piece...
I made two sizes,one long enough for 8 footers and a 54" for shorter boards. I used 1/4" hardboard for the bottom and a 1 X 3" piece of Oak for the toggles to mount on. It looks like this:




I did that entire stack as fast as I could clamp them, rip them, unclamp them and stack them.
Great idea and I'm adopting it. I cut quite a bit of not so straight material and tend to enjoy right where my fingers were installed in the factory of mamas womb..

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