Wiring up the shop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 05:32 PM Thread Starter
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Wiring up the shop

Had a new 100 amp panel put in and am trying to decide how to wire. The shop is under the garage, so the ceiling is concrete slab. All walls are cinderblock. I have gotten suggestions that include running conduit, using armored cable, and just using UF cable. In any case, I will be attaching straight to the wall or ceiling. What's my best option? Balancing time and effort and cost and safety?
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 05:37 PM
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With no idea whether it's the best approach, I'd use conduit. I doubt if just using UF would meet any kind of code, and armored cable isn't really all that attractive...and probably will cost more.

"I long for the days when coke was a cola and a joint was a bad place to be" (Merle Haggard)
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 05:49 PM
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The underground feeder wire is some terible stuff to strip the wire to use. I would only use that type of wire if you were actually running it underground. Normally the only time conduit is used is outdoors or in wet locations or in commercial locations to meet code requirements. For residential work I would just use romex only running it through conduit if you have to bore through the concrete. The romex can be anchored to the block just fine with straps.
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 05:49 PM
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What are you going to do to the walls? Are you going to put up drywall, pegboard, OSB, etc. If so, you can use 2x2's to bring the wall out so that you can run your electrical behind it, instead of having the wiring out in the open. If you go this way, make sure and mark where the wiring is so that you do NOT nail/screw through it.
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 05:54 PM
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I don't believe Romex can be left exposed on walls, nor do i think you'd want to for a shop....I'd run conduit.

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post #6 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 06:00 PM
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Conduit is around 2-3$ a length. Even if you need 200ft worth of it, you only spending an extra $50. And the wires protected and should stay dry. And no rodents can get at it
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 06:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxman10
Had a new 100 amp panel put in and am trying to decide how to wire. The shop is under the garage, so the ceiling is concrete slab. All walls are cinderblock. I have gotten suggestions that include running conduit, using armored cable, and just using UF cable. In any case, I will be attaching straight to the wall or ceiling. What's my best option? Balancing time and effort and cost and safety?
Conduit is around 2-3$ a length. Even if you need 200ft worth of it, you only spending an extra $50. And the wires protected and should stay dry. And no rodents can get at it
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 06:22 PM Thread Starter
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Steve: what straps have you used for this?

Conduit proponents: would metal or plastic be the better option?
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 06:24 PM
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Metal is the preferred option, it's stronger...doesn't bow, and has better protection, however plastic is easier to work with.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxman10 View Post
Steve: what straps have you used for this?

Conduit proponents: would metal or plastic be the better option?
Of the straps I have in my shop I would probably use this one. I have some others that have a rubber cushion between the strap and the wire but it would hold the wire out from the wall. This link looks like it might be the same ones I have pictured. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...ed=0CEUQrQMwDA

As far as conduit either would be fine. Metal is difficult to do if you are not experienced with it. It's hard to bend and have it come out the way you intended. The plastic pipe is just like running PVC water pipe.
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Last edited by Steve Neul; 08-01-2013 at 06:51 PM.
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 07:05 PM
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I would consult with a real licensed electrician.






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post #12 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 09:15 PM
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for shop wiring in general....

I prefer thinwall conduit because it is durable, protects the wires, is easy to string/pull another circuit, and is not "permanent" since the connections can be loosened and the tubing moved or removed. It is flexible like no other method. You can learn to bend the conduit IF you end up doing it your self.
You can bend and connect all the tubing, then hire an electrician to pull the wiring thereby insuring it will be up to code.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-01-2013, 10:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxman10 View Post
What's my best option?
That will depend on your local municipality. They may require you to use certain materials or certain methods to get the job done. Will this be inspected? If not, if I was to do it, I would use emt run to oversized 4 square boxes. I would use a gfci duplex recep on the 110 side and a 6r-20 duplex recep for the 220 side, that way each outlet drop has 2 plugs for 110 and 220. Each drop should be on two separate breakers, one for 110 and one for 220. If you have any tools that have more specific requirement, (welder, larger b.s. or t.s.) you may want to plan out that location and maybe use a separate box.
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-02-2013, 02:17 PM
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Conduit, PVC conduit is so easy to work with. :)

Bob making sawdust in SW Louisiana
with a EX-21
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-02-2013, 02:28 PM
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EMT conduit for sure! Btw, Steve it is against codes to pull Romex through conduit now. Not to mention it is much harder to do than just using THHN. Sounds like OP needs to hire a Licensed Electrician though. Just my opinion.
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-02-2013, 05:18 PM
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I've been long round and round about wiring up a new sub panel in my garage.

I've come to the conclusion that the beat plan, is one that involves help. Call an electrician and see what he says. Maybe 2 different ones with free estimates.

That way you have 3 opinions on the matter and you can take there estimates and wire it your self if you wish. Tht way you know what you just can't do and what you have to do for it to be safe.
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-03-2013, 09:05 AM
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One other thing.... if you do decide to try and wire your shop yourself (which you are probably capable of with some guidance) and are going to use EMT conduit. You need to use Minerallac Conduit Hangers also refered to as "Minis" in the Electrical industry. You can use Tapcons to attach them to the block wall and then that way your conduit will run straight into your 4 square boxes without having to bend a box offset in every piece of your conduit. Btw, I use to be an electrician.
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-04-2013, 10:21 PM
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I have had 2 garages wired, and I wouldn't think about doing it without metal conduit. It's sturdy, doesn't flex, and if something hits it, it won't cut the wire. The metal conduit ha saved me a few times. I have a 100 amp sub panel that has each receptacle on its own 20 amp breaker. The 4 gang boxes and conduit are flush with the wall, and the Conduit has the offset at the ends to connect to the boxes. It looks really professional. If you go this route, you will not be disappointed.
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