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post #1 of 11 Old 08-23-2013, 03:59 PM Thread Starter
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Wainescotting Planning

I'm hoping to start putting up wainescot (does any one know how to spell or pronounce this?) in my foyer. I am planning on removing door casings and updating those too.

I get the general rules of setting up wainescot, but I have three really tight spaces. How do the pros handle these areas? Each of these areas are between 4 to 8 inches wide.





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post #2 of 11 Old 08-23-2013, 06:28 PM
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You have it spelled right. I pronounce it wayne's coat. As far as the narrow places a lot depends on how you are trimming it. If you have large block panel molding then you might just put the chair rail molding only if there isn't room for the trim.
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post #3 of 11 Old 08-23-2013, 08:49 PM
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My first reaction is to do nothing to those small areas. However, I would really have to see your overall design. I would probably do everything else and then look and determine if nothing looked best or they needed something.

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post #4 of 11 Old 08-24-2013, 05:41 AM
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In my experience it's been "coat" in the South and "cot" in the cooler climates.

We rarely use the term here.It's either Paneling,which wainscot is one example of,but certainly not limited to.......or.....Dado,as in,"the wall's dado section".The latter usually works the best because paneling and wainscot isn't limited to the lower section of a wall.That,and me and my shopdawg contractor bud's like to throw technical architectural terms at each other trying to stump/trump each other,haha.All in good fun.

A cpl links below,because we all know that wiki IS the final source on these matters,haha.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panelling

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dado_(architecture)

Edit:Stupid wiki,I googled "dado section of a wall"...and wiki pukes out a link.Which is what I posted above.Then when clicking on it.....they changed it.Like I said...wiki is such a great resource(not).

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.

Last edited by BWSmith; 08-24-2013 at 05:46 AM.
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post #5 of 11 Old 08-25-2013, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
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BWSmith, I was referencing the rail and stile type of construction with a raised panel in the "square" area. I'm not in love with the beadboard paneling.

Sorry, should have made that clear at the beginning.
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post #6 of 11 Old 08-25-2013, 08:33 PM
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I applaud the effort, but in the areas you pictured, I would just install chair and call it a day. If you have larger areas, then those are the areas to showcase your work.

P.s. - personally I like to miter the edges of the 1/4 round so that you don't have a flat spot sticking out, waiting to stub someone's toe :-)
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post #7 of 11 Old 08-26-2013, 05:40 AM
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No big deal on my response liquid...just sort of tongue in cheek,might even call it "cheeky".It used to be a stickler for me when folks automatically assumed all paneling was wainscot....I got over it.

I will give you a serious headsup though.On lower wall paneling....whatever is used isn't that big of deal.What IS a big deal is your "cap rail",and the subsequent mould that supports it.And then again...the base.

The inset panels set the tone,sure......but it's the "other" elements that tend to separate the am's vs pro-ams vs pro's.So,pick a style...stick with it.Work all the details out,may be in your head or I'd suggest quick 3-d sketches on plain ole typing paper.Then,pick a different style...same routine.

You'll notice certain styles are easier at "hiding" anomolies....like the narrow sections.But only you can decide on what's appropriate for your application.There are some frankly,quite strict "rules" on mouldings as to what goes where and why.These are elements that have been passed down from ancient times.It's a dead giveaway when these rules are broken.Certain pcs belong in certain places....no reason to reinvent the wheel on these kinds of projects.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
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post #8 of 11 Old 08-26-2013, 05:58 AM
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OK....went back and looked at your pics.Here's one treatment that has been a real money maker for us over the last four decades or so,haha.But you have to give credtit to WW'ing talk....you won't get this on any other forum.

Because we're talkin "wainscoat",haha......you're going to be looking for ways to "kill" not only your cap rail,but the base,outside of any style/rail system that holds any paneling right?By kill,I mean a way to have a "home" for the pcs to die into to.

One way...and a rather elegant solution,so it must be consider'd into final design criteria....is:You can very efficiently make a back band moulding that "clips" on outside of existing casing.With a TS and router table you can practically double the "depth" of the casing right where your wainscoat's(hah) cap rail/chair rail needs it the most.

No,you don't have to do the whole house.....are you paneling the whole house?No...don't...reserve it for "special rms".Just like the backband.Good luck,sounds like a fun project.

Edit to add:On the BB(backband),one VERY appropriate mould profile is a "Roman OG"....which is a cyma curve with a fillet or two.In anycase,the profile is twds your exist casing....the outside corner of the BB is simply a sq right angle back to wall.It "clips" on because theres a very shallow(in one direction) rabblt.This not only "locates" your depth,but also turns your "crack" line at a right angle to viewer(another WWT trick here).Don't even mess with a dado head on TS.....your std blade will make this shallow rabbit.I wouldn't even bother cleaning it up on router table......it's a one shot,cut,get it right.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.

Last edited by BWSmith; 08-26-2013 at 06:07 AM.
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post #9 of 11 Old 08-26-2013, 07:53 AM
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I've always spelled it "wainscot/wainscoting", and pronounced it...waynescoating. If you are planning to do larger/longer areas of wall next to/near those areas, I would clad the wall to the height of the chair rail the same and apply a chair rail/cap moulding. If not, maybe just a chair rail/cap. The problem you may have is having the applied moulding to flush out to the casing, or have it able to die into the trim.

Wainscoting usually applies to applied wall covering from a chair rail down to the base moulding. It is more of a regularly spaced panel moulding, or panels. Traditionally if done with lumber, the panel would be done with R&S's and a trimmed/framed panel in successive spacing.

The visual aspect of the room and its size might look too busy with all the grain directions making up the series. Another treatment called "Boiserie" is applying entire walls, or portions of walls with wood/panelling, and adding panel moulding, or panels. This treatment can be integral with wainscoting, like this example, where I used the entire wall.

What I am curious about is in your pictures, the base moulding protrudes past the casing trim. I don't think I would have trimmed it that way.






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post #10 of 11 Old 08-26-2013, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input folks.

There will be a longer run, probably 15 feet or so to the right of the right door in the second picture; so I have the distance to create the panels. In my foyer, there are 5 doors (kitchen, closet, parlor, half bath and utility rooms) all at the kitchen end. All of the molding will be coming down (door casing, shoe and baseboards) as I will be changing it out and it is old with 27 coats of paint and beat up really bad by previous owners.

I have been thinking about what type of door casing to put up, but I definitely will be added a backband to all of the door trim. I know it is going to get tight in some of those spaces.

As for the shoe molding...i agree the 90 degree cut is weird, I didn't install it and I know the angle is 22.5 degrees to softened the break.

I want this project to look as professional as possible and I hate the cheap way of doing this where builders put up a chair rail and picture molding to form the "panels" and call it wainescoting. To me, that looks cheap...if you are going to do it, do it right.

So, in those spaces between the door casings, would you leave it flat (wall) or would you insert a piece of wood that you use for the stiles?

PS > this is all going to be white when completed...so probably going to be built from poplar.
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post #11 of 11 Old 08-26-2013, 09:25 PM
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BWSmith, that is some really good advice. Do you have any pics showing the backbanded molding attached to casing? I was going to do something similar as the OP but gave up because I didn't want to rip out all the existing base, case and chairrail.
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