Table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By WeebyWoodWorker
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 12:26 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 3
View 178674's Photo Album My Photos
Hello, I just recently found this site after I bought a farmhouse table from local shop, not sure where to post this, but I need help/ suggestions. So I ended up having this 7'x42" straight board table built and got it delivered this past Sunday, and it looked perfectly normal. A few days after having it here at my house I noticed that the boards started to separate. I also noticed that one of the boards was bowing. This table is made with pocket holes all around. The top is held together with the apron. I guess what I'm trying to decide is if I should get a hold of the shop that made it for me and tell them what is happening to it, or I should just let it go since it's normal for wood to expand/ contract. I just don't want it to get worse or crack, and then it's gonna be too late to let them know. I will attach pictures of my table. Thanks

Sorry I'm not sure how to straighten the pictures.
Attached Images
    

Last edited by 178674; 01-19-2018 at 12:36 AM.
178674 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 12:59 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I can't tell if the top is several separate boards or has been glued together. It appears the corners at the joints have been sanded round. If it is separate boards then it is normal for it to develop gaps between the more the wood dries. The older it gets the bigger the gaps will get. To correct the bow a board could be screwed to the underside of the top as long as the screw holes had elongated holes. Pan head screws with washers would pull the top down flat and still allow for wood movement. Just don't torque the screws down real tight.

If the top was glued together as a solid piece look under the table top and see how it was fastened to the table. Wood needs to be allowed to shrink and if the maker didn't allow for that the top will split. A lot of us recommend using some small metal clips to mount the top. http://www.rockler.com/table-top-fasteners This would allow the wood to shrink. If someone glued and or screwed the top on that was a basic woodworking mistake the maker should have known better. If that is the case the furniture was just poorly built.

Sometimes though you can do just about everything right and the wood will have a crack in it that you can't see until the top dries more and shrinks and it busts wide open.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 03:05 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,001
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
the photos are unfortunate

The new camera phones have a mind of their own and will refuse to allow normal viewing orientation. Maybe a Moderator can rotate them for you....?

The other issue is lighting. You should review each photo to be certain it illustrates what you are describing, 'cause with bad lighting we have no idea of even what the portion is.

So, in general the table looks massive and well done from a distance. However, "good woodworking" practices should have been employed in the build. This means the table can not be rigidly attached to the aprons. It should be supported, but not fastened in manner that does not permit expansion or contraction of the top. The "Z" clips Steve suggested is a very common method. Elongated holes and washers is another.

Finally, if the boards used to make the top were not acclimated to room environments they will shrink and possibly split AND if construction lumber, 2 X 6's or w 2 X 8's were used directly from the lumber yard, that's exactly what will happen. Construction lumber is not dry enough to use in furniture in the dry environment of a house in the winter months.

It doesn't matter if pocket screws were used to secure them. However, if no glue was used, just the pocket screws it does make it far easier to replace a badly curved or split board. Some "distress" is allowable, and that's kinda up to the end user, in my opinion. It won't be or remain perfect, unlike "fine" furniture.

You do have a bit of a dilemma. If you are so unhappy with the final product, a return to the shop with GOOD photos may be one choice. You may ask to see other examples of tables they built to see what has happened in those instances. They will probably say, it's not their fault, it's the fault of the wood. But, if they used "wet" wood is is their fault. Rushing the product out the door results in the conditions you have described. I also imagine you paid a pretty penny for the table, and you should be satisfied, keeping in mind some distress is allowable.....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-19-2018 at 03:07 AM.
woodnthings is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 3
View 178674's Photo Album My Photos
To steve, yes the boards are not glued together they are individually attached to the apron. I was just worried I guess because I read on this site that the top boards shouldn't be attached to the apron with pocket holes because of wood movement. I guess I knew what style of table I was getting and it's more of a rustic look than a fine piece of furniture, but I guess I wasn't aware of how big of a gap it was going to get, and the other poster mentioned that they might get bigger with time. I thought by Summer when humidity was high the boards would expand and the splits between bords would be minimal.
178674 is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 08:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia12 View Post
To steve, yes the boards are not glued together they are individually attached to the apron. I was just worried I guess because I read on this site that the top boards shouldn't be attached to the apron with pocket holes because of wood movement. I guess I knew what style of table I was getting and it's more of a rustic look than a fine piece of furniture, but I guess I wasn't aware of how big of a gap it was going to get, and the other poster mentioned that they might get bigger with time. I thought by Summer when humidity was high the boards would expand and the splits between bords would be minimal.
Since they are individual boards I think you could get away with attaching them to the table with pocket screws. The moisture content of the boards would have to be particularly high for them to shrink enough to crack. You can expect the spaces between the boards to increase though. If you used another method of attaching the boards such as the Z clips or a mounting board to the skirt with elongated holes you could from time to time loosen the screws and move the boards closer together.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 09:08 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 3
View 178674's Photo Album My Photos
I appreciate the response, and you answered my questions! Thanks!
178674 is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 12:14 PM
Generic Weeb
 
WeebyWoodWorker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Gorgeous Oregon!
Posts: 982
View WeebyWoodWorker's Photo Album My Photos
This might help anybody else who looks on this thread.
Attached Images
   
difalkner likes this.

It's not bad to dream. But you also have to consider what's realistic. -All Might (Boku no Hero Academia)

Last edited by WeebyWoodWorker; 01-19-2018 at 12:15 PM. Reason: Fixed it.
WeebyWoodWorker is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 01-19-2018, 02:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,628
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
You need to talk to the company you bought it from, particularly if boards are bowing, fixing, altering should not be your problem.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Build Your Own Router Table treewok2512 Power Tools & Machinery 23 09-16-2018 12:47 PM
Oak table with table leg wedge joint and brass details Christian S General Woodworking Discussion 13 07-09-2017 03:58 PM
Add a jig saw table to your table saw pbriggs8 Power Tools & Machinery 5 06-20-2016 12:20 AM
Wolfcraft 6157 router table. dbhost Tool Reviews 2 10-02-2015 07:22 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome