Solid equilateral triangles? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 08-07-2016, 12:58 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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are you saying ....?

... make a large equilateral solid, from smaller equilateral pieces by gluing them together? That wouldn't be a bad idea, because of the depth of cut limitations using either a miter saw or table saw. You could probably get a 5" long solid by using just two 2 1/2" pieces. If that's not what you meant, then I take full credit for misunderstanding and suggesting a pretty good way, if I don't say so myself.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #22 of 27 Old 08-07-2016, 09:46 PM
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Maybe this ... ?
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post #23 of 27 Old 08-08-2016, 07:23 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you. So is a 'stop' just a block of wood that I would clamp to the fence of a chop saw or a table saw to keep the wood pieces I cut a uniform length? And are you talking about using the miter gauge on the table saw to do these cuts? Thanks.
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post #24 of 27 Old 08-08-2016, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexanderwallman View Post
So is a 'stop' just a block of wood that I would clamp to the fence of a chop saw or a table saw to keep the wood pieces I cut a uniform length?
Yes, exactly.

I put a slight angle on them and one saw kerf an inch in on the bottom surface. All that does is any sawdust that is pushed to the block is pushed into the saw kerf and finds it's way away from the block, so it doesn't build up and change the length.

I put the long point of the angle away from the surface of the fence, so it provides an accurate, consistent point for the material to touch each cut.

The last suggestion is slide the material up to the stop block gently.

Do not ram it against the stop block. Hitting the stop block too hard can move it, and in a long session of cutting, the cut material will start to grow.

"When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelley, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to recognize that an LZ was too hot, moments before before being killed by a single shot, July 1, 1964.
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post #25 of 27 Old 08-09-2016, 04:22 AM
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More details. I was back in the shop today, and as it happens, I was getting out a number of pieces of pine, and it occurred to me I could take some pictures of the stop block on my sled while I used it today.

This is the saw and the sled I use, the stop block has a partial saw kerf on the bottom edge. The kerf on the stop block is chopping off the point of the blue arrow. (I write notes to myself everywhere.)

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This is me holding the block on the sled, to show where the kerf goes. To use it, I'd just drop it flat. I was holding it up to show the kerf.

Solid equilateral triangles?-holding-block.jpg

The block ready to cut.

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The block has a slight angle on the surface the material hits, the short point is to the sled and the material hits the long point. The angle is on the vertical edge closest to the kerf in the sled.

The partial kerf on the bottom of the stop block is for sawdust. As each piece of material is pushed up against it, any sawdust sitting on the sled from the last cut is pushed into the kerf, and the curve of the kerf then eventually pushes it out of the way. The purpose of this is so that sawdust doesn't build up against the stop block, which allows the material to be pushed completely against the block itself each time.

It's simple. It's scrap. It's cheap. It's fast. If you mess up and slice your stop block to shreds, grab another piece of scrap and go back to work.
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"When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelley, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to recognize that an LZ was too hot, moments before before being killed by a single shot, July 1, 1964.

Last edited by Jammersix; 08-09-2016 at 04:30 AM. Reason: I can't spill.
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post #26 of 27 Old 08-09-2016, 12:30 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I would really like to see someone make one of these

If anyone has an idea that would work for this project, I would like to see how you did it, with step by step photos ... if anyone is so ambitious. :smile3:

I may try myself, but no promises. It's a pretty good challenge, based on the sizes required.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #27 of 27 Old 08-12-2016, 04:19 AM Thread Starter
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This is so helpful. Thank you so much for showing me this. Really, I'm blown away that you would take the time and am excited to get started. :)
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angle cut, cutting, geometric, sculpture, stop block, triangle large cut

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