shop design - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 06:11 PM Thread Starter
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Hi everyone, purchased a property about 1 year ago. Had to knock out a few projects for the wife but am now finally getting around to setting up my shop. Its a 22x25 2 car garage in the backyard. Gutted it out and am now starting electrical/insulating. What height do you recommend for the outlets? I was thinking maybe 4' would be practical. How many should be placed around the shop? Unfortunately I won't be able to run power underground to the table saw, it will have to drop down from the ceiling. I currently own a sliding chop saw and am promised a table saw from the father in law. Understanding I don't have an unlimited budget what would be the next most important power tool to purchase?

Ultimately I'm looking for suggestions on shop flow, the chop saw will have 8' runners on either side and the table saw will be central. It's pretty much wide open except for the entry door and garage door opens on the 22' gable end. If anyone has layouts or pictures of their shop I'd love to have a look

Haven't done any furniture work since high school but dying to give it a go again.

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post #2 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 06:53 PM
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What type of projects are you planning on doing?
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post #3 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
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Hi Kerrys, I'd like to get into furniture making. I'll start small and hopefully work my way up into more complex pieces. My first plan out of pure necessity will be a very simple entryway bench/cubby setup.
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post #4 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 07:08 PM
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I put my outlets at 50" from the bottom to the floor and spaced about every 4'. Cuts down on extension cord use. I use a lot of 4'x8' material, so that keeps the outlets above.
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post #5 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 07:17 PM
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Welcome to the forum! When you get a minute add your first name to your signature line so we'll know what to call you.

And we'd love to see your shop in whatever stage, projects, tools, etc. If you're doing mainly furniture why do you need a 16+ foot long miter saw station? Seems like that takes up a lot of space that could be used for other things.

David

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post #6 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the 50" suggestion, will certainly keep that in mind.

Hi David, thank you for the response, I'll take pictures when I get a chance but at the moment the shop is fairly empty other than the lawn tractor, drywall, baseboard, and some demo tools. Still have one wall of old plywood to rip apart so I can start running the wire and insulate. All the tools are currently in the basement until I can move into the garage.

I was considering the 16' miter station for cutting longer stock with support on either end but I could shorten the length considerably and make an 8' station then bring in a stand as needed.

Found some old pictures from the real estate site, not much has changed other than demo. Really am in the beginning stages and would like to be aware of as many design challenges as I can prior to closing things up.
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post #7 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 08:48 PM
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You can do much with a table saw and miter saw. Perhaps a thickness planer would be a nice addition but I think a decent router and router table with lift would be a good addition if you are thinking power tools.
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post #8 of 14 Old 02-26-2019, 09:24 PM
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I use my 12" bandsaw as much as any other tool in the shop, very handy tool. For furniture work a good 8" jointer would be good, too. I have a good 6" long bed jointer and would love to have an 8" to flatten one side of wider boards.

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post #9 of 14 Old 06-28-2019, 12:11 PM
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This post will be helpful to me since when we moved we will be moving information a hous, we currently live in a condo, I will have a two car garage to build my workshop in. I already have some tools. I have to pull them out of a small storage shed and put them on workmates when I use the and then put them back in so the orch police donít fine me. I have a bench to pick table saw, a planer, drill press and bench sander. I am planning on upgrading my table to a Delta contractor table saw.
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post #10 of 14 Old 06-28-2019, 12:44 PM
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Check out the "Show us your shop" thread on this site.
Also, try to keep in mind things like dust collection and HVAC that you might not have now, but might want down the road.



https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/s...-your-shop-73/

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post #11 of 14 Old 08-23-2019, 03:28 PM
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I didn't notice anyone mentioning an outfeed table for your new table saw. I've cobbled together outfeed support for too many years (and probably did some dangerous reaching) and it's next on my list.

Might not need AC in NH, but some provision for heating would give you more shop time. Looks like a potentially great space.

Jim

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post #12 of 14 Old 08-23-2019, 03:38 PM
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Must say I'm jealous of the space you've got! I also agree with red on the outfeed table . . . If I ever get a bigger shop, that will be my first addition.
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post #13 of 14 Old 08-23-2019, 04:13 PM
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I would stay with the 16' miter station as minimum would not hurt to be longer on the left side. Big problem is that items quickly accumulate on the flat surfaces. Table saw with feed table, thickness planner and jointer in middle laid long ways. You will eventually get into buying hardwoods that are random length and width instead of buying at a big box store. I got a great deal on rift sawn white oak once, 500 bdft, however it was 14' long. Sure hurt cutting it down to 8' just top get it into the shop. I would have preferred to cut it as needed as most got cut to approx 3' which left 2' offcuts. Lots of light, use led's. Receptacles every 4' except where lumber storage is, also receptacles in ceiling. label all receptacles with circuit number. Set at least a 20 circuit panel from the get go. IF MONEY IS TIGHT THEN RUN A PIECE OF CONDUIT AND SET A BOX IN WALLS THAT WILL BE FINISHED, COME BACK LATER WITH WIRE AND RECEPTACLES.

GOOD LUCK
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post #14 of 14 Old 08-24-2019, 07:30 AM
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If you have a table saw, a router table and a bandsaw, you can do an awful lot of furniture building. Unless you have unlimited funds, I wouldnt buy any more tools until I had a need for them. Buy them as the need arises.
Also make a large table saw out-feed table which will double as an assembly table. Preferably with a laminated top such as Formica.
You can flatten and prep a glued up table top with a 4 x 24 handheld belt sander. the old heavy porter Cable ones were great. Anything smaller is hard to control when flattening a table top after glue-up.
I also would stay away from dowel jigs, plate joiners, etc. Just learn good joinery.

And most of all, have fun!

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx

Last edited by Tony B; 08-24-2019 at 07:46 AM.
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