A shelf to absorb vibrations? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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A shelf to absorb vibrations?

My house is old, therefore floors creak and things can shake/rattle a little when walking around the room. Not to the point that things fall off the walls, but enough it makes my record player skip sometimes. So I wanted to build a shelf but perhaps with a hollow core filled with something that could diminish such vibrations. It's just a thought at the moment, wondering if anyone had some ideas.
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post #2 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 09:19 AM
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Wow, if you are getting that much vibration you have more important issues than the record player. Something is very wrong with the house. If it's pier and beam you might have a pier that has failed or maybe the beam across it. I think you would be better off trying to solve that issue rather than fixing the record player.
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post #3 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 10:03 AM
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I agree with Steve. If simply walking through a room causes things to shake, you have some structure issues. It may be due to the dead load in the room overloading the existing structure. We tend to have more furniture and "stuff" now than back a few decades ago. Our new home has every third floor joist doubled and there are a couple of tripled gluelam beams in certain spots. Even so, we ended up with a "soft spot" going into the master bedroom that caused the dresser drawer pulls to rattle when entering/leaving the room. I sister-ed in additional joists in two runs under the soft area and then added some solid bridging between them and the adjacent joists. No more vibration when walking by. The skipping record player is systematic of a more severe problem. For an instant fix, why not sit the record player on an upholstery foam pad?

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Last edited by Jim Frye; 01-23-2019 at 10:06 AM. Reason: added thought
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post #4 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 10:17 AM
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to address the question: you could take two pieces of plywood
the same size as the record player bottom. find some 3/4" foam
and cut it into two inch squares. place them between the two
pieces of plywood. after some trial and error to see how many
pieces of foam will solve your problem, glue them into place.
I used this technique when shipping delicate electronic equipment
and it works quite well.
good luck and happy tunes !!

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-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --
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post #5 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
My house is old, therefore floors creak and things can shake/rattle a little when walking around the room. Not to the point that things fall off the walls, but enough it makes my record player skip sometimes. So I wanted to build a shelf but perhaps with a hollow core filled with something that could diminish such vibrations. It's just a thought at the moment, wondering if anyone had some ideas.
Assess all the load bearing walls in your house and make sure they are supported all the way down to the basement foundation. Add additional walls, beams, and columns as necessary...your floor shouldn't bounce that much and a shelf won't fix the underlying problem.
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post #6 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 01:14 PM
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Two wrongs never make a right, think I would look at eliminating the cause.

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post #7 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
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The house structure is fine. Original wood floors, no carpet to dampen anything. You guys make it sound like I'd knock over a glass of water walking by, that's not the case. But it's a sensitive needle. My friend has the same issue with his player (different model) in his chicago apartment.

Fortunately, my neighbor recently moved out. His car's speakers would shake every house in the neighborhood from blocks away. I was told that someone got so fed up with his music they shot at his garage.

Quote:
find some 3/4" foam
and cut it into two inch squares. place them between the two
pieces of plywood.
You think cork could work well?
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post #8 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 04:24 PM
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OK, if it is not a building structure problem (which I doubt) then it is a record player problem. Any decent record player has built in vibration dampening. Walking across the floor of even a weak structure should not cause a problem with a record player. How much tracking weight do you have set into the player?



Foam will not do much for physical vibrations unless it is very soft.


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post #9 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 05:16 PM
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Really old floors often have rusty nails that allow the floor to "bounce."
Can you get at it from underneath and have a look?
I have a caulking tube of some sort of gap filler that is a good cushion under wonky stair boards.



I'd float the turntable on foam rubber. Better vibration damper than cork.
Maybe add feet to the turntable made out of carved pieces of Pink Pearl erasers.
I use PP to isolate a small rotary vacuum pump.
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post #10 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 06:15 PM
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Even if the floor bounces, how do the bounces("vibrations") get up the wall to the shelf that holds the player.


There are some significant problems here.


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post #11 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 07:34 PM
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Instead of a shelf you might try putting down a area rug with some carpet underlayment under it where the record player is.
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post #12 of 26 Old 01-23-2019, 07:35 PM
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My old Garrad turntable had soft springs on each corner with some soft foam rubber inside each spring to dampen any harmonics in the springs. The turntable base was mounted on drawer slides and had no skipping issues. Just a thought if you aren’t concerned with the house structure.
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post #13 of 26 Old 01-24-2019, 06:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Frye View Post
My old Garrad turntable had soft springs on each corner with some soft foam rubber inside each spring to dampen any harmonics in the springs. The turntable base was mounted on drawer slides and had no skipping issues. Just a thought if you aren’t concerned with the house structure.

I still have my old Garrad.


George
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post #14 of 26 Old 01-24-2019, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
phaelax;
You think cork could work well?
I have never used cork for anything other than a note board.
I can only tell you from my personal experience of shipping
electronics (some pieces as big as a Volkswagen Bug) with
the two pieces of plywood with foam rubber of different densities
sandwiched in the middle to dampen the transmission of shock
and vibration to the part.
like I suggested, you have to experiment with different things
to see what will work best for you in your environment.
if there is a small fan for cooling, and it vents out of the bottom,
be careful not to block the vents.
how long have you had this record player ?

Happy Tunes !

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 01-24-2019 at 08:58 AM.
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post #15 of 26 Old 01-24-2019, 09:14 PM Thread Starter
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The player is brand new. After some googling last night, this issue appears to be quite common. I've found a ton of sites where people ask about reducing vibrations to their players. Someone had suggested suspending it from the ceiling, I'm not sure about all that.

Quote:
how do the bounces("vibrations") get up the wall to the shelf that holds the player.
Quote:
instead of a shelf you might try putting down a area rug
It's not on a shelf, my buddy put his on a shelf. Can't really put it on the floor, not only am I fairly certain that would only increase the issue but I also have a cat that likes to sit on things.

I may just go with a shelf and see how that does. My walls are pretty solid.
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post #16 of 26 Old 01-25-2019, 01:32 AM
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OP beat me to it with his last post (above), but I have had several set-ups where the turntable sat on a shelf suspended from the ceiling by cables.

The first was of necessity in an apartment friends were renting. The slightest movement made the needle skip, until we moved to the ceiling-hung setup.

We used a piece of plywood just larger than the turntable's footprint. Four lengths of wire cabling were passed through a hole in each corner of the plywood.

The other end of each strand were passed through eye bolts threaded into the ceiling rafters.

Have a look at this stuff:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...1072/300018981
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post #17 of 26 Old 01-25-2019, 06:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
The player is brand new. After some googling last night, this issue appears to be quite common. I've found a ton of sites where people ask about reducing vibrations to their players. Someone had suggested suspending it from the ceiling, I'm not sure about all that.




It's not on a shelf, my buddy put his on a shelf. Can't really put it on the floor, not only am I fairly certain that would only increase the issue but I also have a cat that likes to sit on things.

I may just go with a shelf and see how that does. My walls are pretty solid.

It reads like companies making modern record players have forgotten how to isolate them from outside interference.



You never did say just what tracking force you had on the tone arm. That makes a significant difference.



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post #18 of 26 Old 01-25-2019, 12:02 PM
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Audiophiles deal with this issue at various levels. Even if @phaelax finds a way to prevent the stylus from skipping as he/she walks around, it does not imply that the stylus will track properly in the record groves. Improper tracking could result in damage to the record grooves or the stylus itself.

Assuming that phaelax can solve the skipping problem AND get decent stylus tracking, then the next level is reducing feedback. The sound vibrations from the speakers in the room can get to the stylus and interfere with the playback. This happens at audio frequencies, not walking person frequencies. A good record player design isolates the stylus from those vibrations with tuned springs, rubber mounts, belts, etc.

Here are the points that I am trying to make:

* Even if the stylus isn't skipping any more, it may still track poorly as you walk around the room, resulting in record damage and a higher potential for stylus damage and wear. Over time, your records may accumulate more than a reasonable amount of pops, clicks, distortion, and other noise.

* The vibration damping that is designed into today's record players is for reducing feedback at audio frequencies, not to stabilize the stylus from skipping as people walk around the room.

I am not trying to turn phaelax into an audiophile. "Dance party vibration damping" (my term) is obviously the first step to solving the stylus skipping problem. My point is that stylus tracking is more than that, and ignoring basic stylus tracking issues may result in increased wear and/or long term damage to phaelax' records (and stylus).
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post #19 of 26 Old 01-25-2019, 01:37 PM
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Anyone figure out why cassette taped became popular, and then why we moved on to CD's yet?

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post #20 of 26 Old 01-26-2019, 07:04 PM
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Sorta off topic,,,,,,50 yrs ago lived in a family owned home, that have been built prior to 1900.......It had been added on to,,, many times...Once I looked in the crawl space under the ‘original ‘ part....The floor joists were 6” to 8” oak logs, with the bark still on them..they were supported by more oak logs just stuck vertically in the sand underneath....No wonder the flow squeaked when walking...

Got out of there as soon as we could.
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