Reduce thinkness on a wood board - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
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Reduce thinkness on a wood board

Hello,

I'm kind of newbie on wood projects and I want to do something that i'm not sure which is the best process to achieve it. I googled it alot but wasn't able to find a good answer.

I've a 44cm lenght wood board and i want to reduce the thinkness from 1,5cm to 0,5cm at a constant angle rate in the last 31 cm.

As the board is so skinny i'm not sure if i can do this cut on a saw.

The with dimension is 22.

But i'm not acquainted to the wood process

Can you give me some lights so I can investigate further?
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post #2 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 12:47 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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not a task for a novice unless.....

As an experienced woodworker I would use a router and sled, tipping the board at the appropriate angle. The width of 22 cm coverts to 8.66 inches, is beyond the resaw capacity of all but the largest bandsaws. But that would be an easy solution if you have access to one.
You could make a series of cross cuts on the table saw with the board held in a jig at the appropriate angle and knock out the waste in between. Then plane the surface smooth with a hand plane. You could do the same with a hand held circular saw, adjusting the depth of cut vfor each succeeding cross cut which correspond to the angle.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-04-2017 at 12:53 PM.
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post #3 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 01:43 PM
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It could be done on a jointer that is wide enough.
It could be done with a router sled
It could be done with a hand plane
It could be done with a belt sander with a coarse belt.
You could also construct a cradle to hold the board on a angle and surface it in a planer.
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post #4 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 02:44 PM
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You could use a bandsaw, then sand or hand-plane to clean it up. I'd vote for either router sled or hand-plane, though: a fore-plane (or scrub, or jack plane) will take it down a centimeter quite quickly if you work across the grain. Then use a finer set plane to make it flat and smooth.
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post #5 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It could be done on a jointer that is wide enough.
It could be done with a router sled
It could be done with a hand plane
It could be done with a belt sander with a coarse belt.
You could also construct a cradle to hold the board on a angle and surface it in a planer.
From the drawing shown on the post, the taper is only on 2/3rds of the length.
It would be very difficult to start the taper midway using a conventional surface planer.
I think the hand plane or tapered router sled may be the best answer.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #6 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 05:38 PM
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From his introduction I think this newbie is too "new" to even have an idea of what a router sled is, much have and know how to use a router.

I think that his best bet is to use a hand plane. It will take some trial and error and a few wasted boards but it can be done this way.

A belt sander, either stationary or hand held would also work. But he does not have these either. And, I would use a medium grit, not a coarse grit. He will make too many mistakes and the coarse grit is less forgiving.

If he knows how to sharpen a knife, he can buy a relatively cheap plane and, keeping the blade sharp, get the job done.

George
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post #7 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
From the drawing shown on the post, the taper is only on 2/3rds of the length.
It would be very difficult to start the taper midway using a conventional surface planer.
I think the hand plane or tapered router sled may be the best answer.
It's not as difficult as you think to make a taper on wood with a planer. As long as you don't go too thin with one edge you can make a cradle to hold the wood at a angle and surface.

I did neglect to add a lip in my drawing on the front end to keep the board from raising up.
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post #8 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's not as difficult as you think to make a taper on wood with a planer. As long as you don't go too thin with one edge you can make a cradle to hold the wood at a angle and surface.

I did neglect to add a lip in my drawing on the front end to keep the board from raising up.
I understand making the taper with the planer. The problem I see is 1/3 of the board has no taper. The taper starts at a certain line and goes to the end. I think it will be difficult to start the taper on the start line using only a surface planer.
Using hand tools you would just draw a starting line but on the planer 1/3 of the board has run through before you start and you can’t see your start line.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #9 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's not as difficult as you think to make a taper on wood with a planer. As long as you don't go too thin with one edge you can make a cradle to hold the wood at a angle and surface.

I did neglect to add a lip in my drawing on the front end to keep the board from raising up.
Problem I see with your diagram is "wedge". How will a noobie fabricate a wedge that can adequately support his board?

I agree that a hand plane is the best option here without access of a large band saw, given noobie status, limited tools, and (likely) limited funds.
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post #10 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 09:28 PM
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full disclosure here ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
I understand making the taper with the planer. The problem I see is 1/3 of the board has no taper. The taper starts at a certain line and goes to the end. I think it will be difficult to start the taper on the start line using only a surface planer.
Using hand tools you would just draw a starting line but on the planer 1/3 of the board has run through before you start and you can’t see your start line.

I have never done this, so I may be all wet, but I'm raising the thinnest end into the planer first taking off a small amount with each pass until I reach the "finish line". The angle the board is supported at is the key to getting the correct taper. You can do the math using trig, or you can just raise it up using a spacer block(s) until it's parallel with a flat surface. The most material needing to be removed is .5 cm at the lead end, tapering to 0.0 at the finish line.

Now the 64,$$$ question is, does the OP have a planer? I doubt it. If it were me, I'd just make decreasing depth saw cuts across the width until I got to 0.0 at the finish line and then hand plane the surface to get it smooth. It will take a while......

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 09:34 PM
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Perhaps rather then speculating, the original poster could give us an idea of what tools he owns and what tools/expertise he might have access too. Once we get that information then we can make suggestions based on what tools he has available. If he is willing to buy something, perhaps a budget would be helpful.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #12 of 18 Old 12-04-2017, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Eriksen View Post
Problem I see with your diagram is "wedge". How will a noobie fabricate a wedge that can adequately support his board?

I agree that a hand plane is the best option here without access of a large band saw, given noobie status, limited tools, and (likely) limited funds.
The biggest if is if the newbie has a planer or not. The wedge could be cut with a jigsaw or even a hand saw. It would just take three of them for a board 9" wide. It doesn't have to be the full width of the board.
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post #13 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 02:30 AM
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I really don't know how one does something like this with only basic tools and little experience, it is a job for a professional that has the equipment, probably a thickness sander wide enough to run the board through sideways on a carrier. Perhaps there is a local cabinet shop that could do the work, probably for about the cost of a hand plane.

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post #14 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 06:27 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Perhaps rather then speculating, the original poster could give us an idea of what tools he owns and what tools/expertise he might have access too. Once we get that information then we can make suggestions based on what tools he has available. If he is willing to buy something, perhaps a budget would be helpful.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.

Hi to everyone! first of all thank you for the prompt reply! I'm really apreciated for the superb ideas and concepts.

I have some tools: Electric saw, Sanding machine. Some manual wood carving tools as a chiszel and clamps etc.

I don't have an hand plane but i have a budget of 100$.

My idea is to create some prototypes for a beach racket. I would like to industrializate the process to create a product. But this is for doing some prototypes at home to study some designs and patterns.

Best regards,
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post #15 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 06:41 AM
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With a wood carving gouge you could create a rough shape and then sand it to the finished part.
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post #16 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 07:56 AM
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It seems to me that a hand plane is the correct tool for this job.
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... turning perfectly good wood into firewood every day ... :smile3:
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post #17 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 12:38 PM
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Here is the thing, there is no cheap efficient way around this if it is going into production, spend your time on more useful endeavors and let someone with the proper tools prepare your material to the point where you can finish it. If the product takes off then you can consider tooling up your shop with the best machines for the job, just be a bit chatty with the guy doing it for you and learn what you can about the pitfalls.

In another life I sell model steam engine parts, some of them I make myself, others I have made by a shop with CNC equipment because I can't make them for what I pay them to do it.

All too often we fall into the trap of being so busy making a product that we don't have time to sell it or grow our business.

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post #18 of 18 Old 12-05-2017, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Perhaps rather then speculating, the original poster could give us an idea of what tools he owns and what tools/expertise he might have access too. Once we get that information then we can make suggestions based on what tools he has available. If he is willing to buy something, perhaps a budget would be helpful.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Oh gosh, really? You think we should ask for concrete information instead of speculating. What a unique idea.

That is not the way this forum (or any other that I visit) works.

It is much more fun just to start speculating.

George
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