How would you do this? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 03-20-2012, 08:19 PM Thread Starter
Jeff G
 
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How would you do this?

Hi everyone,

I'm in the process of replicating this beautiful bench (http://reitmeyerdesign.com/?p=366) and have a question for you all.

In this photo (http://reitmeyerdesign.com/?attachment_id=349) you can see that the edges of the legs of the bench are beveled on both sides, but that the underside of the seat of the bench is not. Where the two come together there's an odd look. You get one board (the leg) that is beveled, but than one board (the seat) that is not. To be super clear, below is a photo with the area I'm talking.

My question is, if I wanted to bevel the part of the seat that comes into contact with the leg so that it starts beveled (by the joint) and then fades out to not being beveled, how would I do this? I'm trying to find a way to better express this, so in the 2nd photo you can see the red area. The more red, the more bevel I want. The less red, the less bevel...eventually fading to nothing.

I see a number of challenges including the fact that this is a curved surface and that I need a way to enter and exit the wood at exactly the same spot on each piece.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
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post #2 of 16 Old 03-20-2012, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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Oops...second photo here.
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post #3 of 16 Old 03-20-2012, 10:19 PM
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I would cut a wedge to fit the arc with the thin end to the joint, tape or temp glue it in place and then you run the router up it, when you remove it , it will be tapered on the original.

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post #4 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 12:18 AM
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You may have enough pieces to warrant a pattern for the router table / shaper.

I would be tempted to use a pattern oversized at the taper-out portion.

Later, when the double chamfer / bevel is cut, reshape the square edge on the pattern that has the oversized portion removed.


If you already have the pieces cut, I like the wedge method lawrence mentioned. Blue Painters tape should be thin enough to hold it all.

Looks like a fun project.
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post #5 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 02:27 AM
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How about beveling after the glue-up is done with a router. When you come to the joint you can tape or glue an angled board to the top so that when your router passes over it, it will reduce the chamfer as it passes over the board.
I'm thinking about an angled board that is wedge shaped.
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post #6 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 02:35 AM
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Sharp chisel... should take you all the way.

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OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

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post #7 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 03:43 AM
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Before or after assembly?BW

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
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post #8 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 10:05 AM Thread Starter
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BWSmith: I'd prefer to do this before assembly, but open to suggestions.

mdntrdr: I thought about this, and I may go this route, but I'm worried about blowing out chunks of wood when i exit with the chisel. Any ideas on how to prevent this?

sawdust55109: I think i understand what you're suggesting, but can you be more specific? I've never done anything like that, so any extra details would be greatly appreciated!

-Jeff G
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post #9 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buktotruth View Post
mdntrdr: I thought about this, and I may go this route, but I'm worried about blowing out chunks of wood when i exit with the chisel. Any ideas on how to prevent this?

Use a backer board.

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post #10 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 10:48 AM
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I'd use a sharp chisel, draw-knife, or spokeshave. Any one of them can do a bevel like that... just take thin slivers off with each pass!
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post #11 of 16 Old 03-21-2012, 11:55 AM
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I would drawknife it.
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post #12 of 16 Old 03-22-2012, 08:41 AM
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I would use the router bit you used for the chamfer right at the joint and then taper the cut out with a sharp chisel. Had you added this detail before it was assembled you could have rigged a spindle sander on a drill press with the table on a angle to make this transition. If you are making a large number of them you could make template to ease the router into the cut.

Last edited by Steve Neul; 03-22-2012 at 08:44 AM.
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post #13 of 16 Old 03-22-2012, 10:16 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for the comments.

Especially thanks to Steve Neul (below):
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I would use the router bit you used for the chamfer right at the joint and then taper the cut out with a sharp chisel. Had you added this detail before it was assembled you could have rigged a spindle sander on a drill press with the table on a angle to make this transition. If you are making a large number of them you could make template to ease the router into the cut.
I haven't actually built this...just setting up and making templates now. So I love the sander suggestion. I actually have a spindle sander that has a base that can be set at any angle. I'm going to test this out with some scrap and see how it comes out. In theory, this seems like the way to go. Ideally, I suppose, I was hoping for some sort of jig that would make the cut perfectly repeatable, but I'll settle for marking out my cuts carefully and sanding to the line.

I'm avoiding chisels for now b/c, honestly, I'm not very good with them (yet).

Again, thanks everyone! I'll be sure to post photos as the project progresses.

-Jeff G
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post #14 of 16 Old 03-23-2012, 05:04 AM
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Stationary sander....we call'm belt grinders.

We mess with enough broken furniture and am involved with the design of same to be conversant.Belt grinding was/is/and always will be part of the furniture biz.


Now thats out of the way,the fun part......not sayin this IS gonna happen.But it "may".Looks are deceiving.......what looks like a simple bevel'd radius may have some rather interesting consequences.IOWs,when you run your test monkey's,pay real close attention to where bevels meet up at their ends.This isn't a prblem and not trying to make it one.


What happens sometimes,and this is just part of the creation process......is because of some rather complicated trig,and how it "plays out" in certain designs....you get basically an anomaly.How well you disguise this.....not being a true,equal width/angle'd bevel is part of the design process.


In he biz,before a particular "design" gets the final OK.....you must make sure we can efficiently(read that as FAST)make visual and physical connections in joinery.

All above is just part of what we do....not trying to be a dick or bring down your project....I find it fascinating,good luck,BW

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post #15 of 16 Old 04-01-2012, 07:32 PM
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If making several of the same (even if not) I would make a template/jig to use with the same router bit as used on the legs....
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post #16 of 16 Old 04-01-2012, 10:32 PM
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That's what I would do since the parts are unassembled. It would be a lot more uniform to use a template to ease the router into it. The spindle sander would work however each part would end up a little different. You probably should leave the part a little long until the router work is done because it's liable to chip at the end of the rail. Then the chip part can be cut off.
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