Furniture design - division by 7ths to determine measurements - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 08-16-2019, 02:58 PM Thread Starter
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Furniture design - division by 7ths to determine measurements

I was discussing this with a co-woodworker friend, and I thought the concept is neat. The idea is that people find division by 7ths to be aesthetically pleasing/harmonizing (like music scale).

Examples: You build a cabinet with hutch. The bottom cabinet would measure 3/7 of total height, and the hutch would measure the remaining 4/7 of height.
Or you are building a dresser, 4 drawers tall. The bottom 3 drawers (stacked) would be 2/7 total height each, and the top drawer would be 1/7 height. (or a 3/2/2 division).

I haven't found any information on the magic web, but I'd like to read on it.

Any books or articles that touch on this subject?
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post #2 of 13 Old 08-16-2019, 03:08 PM
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I haven't heard of "sevenths" before, but the Golden Ratio is a common one (1.618, 3/5 and 5/8 are close to that). There is a good book that uses this quite a bit, "By Hand and Eye" and the book is in the proportions of the Golden Ratio :-)

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post #3 of 13 Old 08-16-2019, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiknNutz View Post
I haven't heard of "sevenths" before, but the Golden Ratio is a common one (1.618, 3/5 and 5/8 are close to that). There is a good book that uses this quite a book, "By Hand and Eye" and the book is in the proportions of the Golden Ratio :-)
I've read about the Golden Ratio before. I don't think it's exactly what he's talking about, but maybe it is. I appreciate the book reference, and will look it up!
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post #4 of 13 Old 08-18-2019, 04:05 PM
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I too can't say I ever recalling, being taught or seeing anything in old tome about "7ths" but there is a plethora of info on scaling to the golden section/ratio...and other old standards and "rules of thumb" modalities...Good Luck,

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post #5 of 13 Old 08-18-2019, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeOpossum74 View Post
I was discussing this with a co-woodworker friend, and I thought the concept is neat. The idea is that people find division by 7ths to be aesthetically pleasing/harmonizing (like music scale).

Examples: You build a cabinet with hutch. The bottom cabinet would measure 3/7 of total height, and the hutch would measure the remaining 4/7 of height.
Or you are building a dresser, 4 drawers tall. The bottom 3 drawers (stacked) would be 2/7 total height each, and the top drawer would be 1/7 height. (or a 3/2/2 division).

I haven't found any information on the magic web, but I'd like to read on it.

Any books or articles that touch on this subject?
If those ratios were of any standard then most furniture would be very close to those standards. From what I've seen furniture is every conceivable size you can think of. The only exception would be the height of a table or desk. These at one time were around 29" but like most things subject to change. People are taller today so the so-called standard height is subject to change. I'm starting to see tables and desks 32" tall now.
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post #6 of 13 Old 08-18-2019, 11:32 PM
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Fibonacci numbers...1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89...used by mathematicians, architects, musicians, artists, found all through the natural world and some claim are the building blocks of the universe.
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post #7 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 10:12 AM
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Fibonacci numbers...1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89...used by mathematicians, architects, musicians, artists, found all through the natural world and some claim are the building blocks of the universe.
But what did the Universe use before Fibonacci invented his number scheme?
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post #8 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 10:44 AM
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But what did the Universe use before Fibonacci invented his number scheme?
He did not invent it, he discovered it.
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post #9 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 11:30 AM
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But what did the Universe use before Fibonacci invented his number scheme?
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He did not invent it, he discovered it.
What can I say to that? Asked and answered.
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post #10 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 11:38 AM
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With a trade as old as woodworking there are many that would benefit from learning the traditional tried and true methods rather than continually striving to reinvent the wheel.

I can imagine Fibronacci looking at an object and wondering, what is it that I like about that, rather than trying to figure out a way to improve it even more.
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post #11 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 12:42 PM
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I made a picture frame that used the Golden Ratio in a couple different ways. Unfortunately, by the time it was done the frame itself was simply wrong for the picture. In theory, it was a match made in heaven. In reality, they were not compatible. And so they both sit, alone and wanting.
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post #12 of 13 Old 08-19-2019, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Kerrys View Post
Fibonacci numbers...1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89...used by mathematicians, architects, musicians, artists, found all through the natural world and some claim are the building blocks of the universe.
Yeah, I was just coming here to comment that I found reference to it in relation to the Golden Ratio. So neat! As a kid I remember just crunching numbers like the Fibonacci sequence when I was bored (adding the previous numbers to create the next). Didn't realize there was actually significance!

I plan to incorporate Golden Ratio/Fibonacci into whatever my next woodworking project is, just to see how it pans out.
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post #13 of 13 Old 08-20-2019, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by AwesomeOpossum74 View Post
I was discussing this with a co-woodworker friend, and I thought the concept is neat. The idea is that people find division by 7ths to be aesthetically pleasing/harmonizing (like music scale).

Examples: You build a cabinet with hutch. The bottom cabinet would measure 3/7 of total height, and the hutch would measure the remaining 4/7 of height.
Or you are building a dresser, 4 drawers tall. The bottom 3 drawers (stacked) would be 2/7 total height each, and the top drawer would be 1/7 height. (or a 3/2/2 division).

I haven't found any information on the magic web, but I'd like to read on it.

Any books or articles that touch on this subject?

Hmmm...interesting.

Mother is the necessity of most invention.
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