Essential Needs for new shop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 07-29-2008, 07:46 PM Thread Starter
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Essential Needs for new shop

I am in the process of trying to plan my new shop. I haven't broken ground so I have plenty of time. I am thinking I am going to build a 24x32 or 24x36 with 10' cielings. I would like to put a small loft or storage area above. I have alot of hand tools but our house now I just have a small storage shed so no real shop so I never have prchased bench or stationary tools. I guess my question is what do ya'll think the essential tools for a new shop? I have acess to just about anything at my dads shop, bu I would like to have my own things. All suggestions are welcome. Thanks Michael
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post #2 of 17 Old 07-29-2008, 09:08 PM
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I know this is a woodworking forum, but I'm going to go to extremes here and say that you may want to clarify your question a bit. What I mean is are you going to be working on cars (the "extreme" part of my post) or making fine furniture? Small projects, large projects, or what?

The reason I say that is there are a lot of options when putting together a good shop. Some will not live without certain tools, others say they are not important at all. It depends on what your skills and intentions are...

But you have one thing already in mind that will save you TONS of headaches... Lots of storage for lumber...

Now, with that said, I would think any woodworker would want certain things in his shop, at least 95% would...

1. A table saw
2. A good workbench, or two... or three... or more
3. A drill press
4. LOTS of storage for small tools, bits, blades, screws, glue, varnish, paint, etc.
5. Clamps out the.... uh... ying-yang

You say you have lots of hand tools and I'm assuming you are talking planes, drills, hammers, sanders, routers, etc. so I won't go into the smaller tools.

After the first five, which are not in PERFECT order, but close on my list, I would start considering:

1. Miter or radial arm saw.
2. Router table
3. Jointer
4. Planer (if you plan on buying any rough lumber.)
5. Disk/belt sander
6. Band saw

Then there is the idea of a lathe. Are you wanting to start out doing turning? If so, that may go up the priority list...

Of course, this is one man's opinion and I'll be very surprised if you get two answers that are exactly the same... But I'm willing to bet my top 5 list is going to be close...

Good luck with your shop and know that I'm envious... I'm renting and can't build anything at my house like that. I have to settle for my half of the garage until we buy...

I cut that board three times and it's STILL too short!!!...
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post #3 of 17 Old 07-29-2008, 09:38 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry, I should have specified. Mostly woodworking. I plan on build a lean-to to store my boat and lawn and garden things. You are correct about he hand tools.
-Circular saw
-jig saw
-vibrating and oscilating sanders
-belt sander
-drills
-compund miter saw
-other misc. hand power and forearm power tools.

My biggest concern is bigger tools like table saw, radial arm saw, jointer, planer, etc etc etc......

I plan on building furninture and some cabinets and misc stuff. I don't plan on doing a whole lot of auto mechanics that is what I am not very patient with.
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-29-2008, 10:04 PM
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I'm going to get in trouble...

The hand tools aren't a question as they are a given. The stationary power tools are the question. Building fine furniture is the big one. I would think you need it all. Good table saw, band saw, drill press, planer..Heck everything you mentioned and then some. Build it big so you will have room to move. Get a couple cans of paint that you use to mark lines on the ground and draw it out.
Check out the workshop planer.
http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx
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post #5 of 17 Old 07-29-2008, 11:10 PM
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What a shop needs

Well that is a loaded question. Besides all that has been mentioned above, 1. I think you will need a very understanding wife.
2. you should think of plenty of electrical outlets and heavey wire in the walls to carry shop tools. Most shop tools pull better than 13 amps. When I built my shop I put an outlet every 4 feet on all the walls.
3.Something else over looked is plumbing your new shop with air outlets.
4. Place windows and doors where you can get a cross breaze and those nicer days.
5. a dehumitifyer to keep your tools from rusting.
6., a dust collection and air purifyer. Oh yea Now buy some tools.

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Fixer of all things broke
Expert = Drip under pressure

Last edited by Handyman; 07-29-2008 at 11:20 PM. Reason: because I can
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 01:46 AM
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Well one thing I never thought of that I should of - after completing my shop - small 24 x24 - my last tool was to be a lathe. Then I though - hey - I built this for using in the winter - and I thought - I really need heat. So my lathe went out the window and I added heat - which is realllly a necessary tool for the shop. And I think Handyman has the right idea.

Larry

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post #7 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 08:23 AM
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Thumbs up

There's really no right or wrong, but there are alot of different approaches depending on your wants, situation, and knowledge (or lack of ) A good book or three are a good start...your library may have several.

The TS is a primary tool in most shops, but if turning with a lathe is your main interest, a TS will have less value than a good bandsaw. I follow the same basic steps as "Norm" and David Marks...a good TS, jointer, and planer make up my main work triangle and get used early in the process for most projects so I can start with straight, flat stock.

After TS, jointer, planer... a good router or two, especially one mounted in a router table is a really versatile and valuable tool.

From there a DP, BS, sander, DC all have a place...their importance will vary with your needs.

A good work surface is a must too (aka workbench)...and can even be a simple well supported table surface. Things like clamps, hand planes, chisels, measuring instruments, are always useful.

Re: the actual shop...good lighting and climate control can add alot to your experience out there.

Good luck and have fun!
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post #8 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 08:24 AM
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Handyman is soooo right about designing your windows so you can have a cross breeze. If you haven't broken ground yet - no problem. Be sure to determine the predominant wind direction in your area and install windows accordingly. Where I live the wind is usually out of the south and my shop only has two windows - one on the south side and one on the north side. Not only does it serve to regulate temperature during spring, summer, and fall, it provides for adequate ventilation when using chemicals in the shop and dust removal when sanding.

Oh, yeah,,,,, get tools too - starting with a table saw.
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post #9 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 09:05 AM
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AC in the shop........

I noticed everyone talked about windows and a breeze. I'm shopping for a new heat /ac unit. I have told them I want something big enough for the garage/shop. Is it me or most shops aren't cooled.
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post #10 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies so far. As far as the wife goes i'm not worried about that, its easier to sleep on the couch than to have to ask permission to buy something. I live in south Alabama so an A/c would be on my list, it really doesn't get cold enough to justify a big heating unit. I'll get a kerosene blower if I need it. The wind swirls alot at my property so I guess I should out a window on each side. As far as the electrical goes that is my second job, so the only cost will be wire and plugs. I plan on running dedicated circuits to all the bigger stuff. What do you guys think of ceiling mounted cords that hang down for sanding and things like that? Do most of ya'll have you air supply running through PVC or cast iron?
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post #11 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 11:11 AM
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My biggest regret, building too small. (but I make due). I built a big compressor from parts I found at my fathers house and plumbed it all in black pipe. Get a good dust collector too. No need to spend alot, $250 will get you one more than adequate. In furniture projects, I'd say the most important bigger tools I've found are
1. good table saw
2. mitre saw (I got a makita 12" sliding compound and love it)
3. band saw
4. good router table (but you have to explain to your wife why you MUST have two routers)
5. workbench with access to all sides
6. belt/disc sander (very handy)

Don't recommend pvc for your airlines, always the chance of impact and shattering and causing injury

Of course, we NEED any tool we think looks neat, the list above are just the main ones I've found most valuable for what you want to do. Once again...IF YOU GET TO BUILD THE SHOP YOURSELF...DON'T BUILD IT TOO SMALL!!

Last edited by OldnBroken; 07-30-2008 at 11:14 AM.
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post #12 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldnBroken View Post
...4. good router table (but you have to explain to your wife why you MUST have two routers)
...
Two? Only two? Don't tell MY wife that... I've convinced her I need at LEAST four....

One plunge for the table, one plunge for outside the table, one fixed for other projects, and one as a spare in case one goes down...

I cut that board three times and it's STILL too short!!!...
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post #13 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 04:37 PM
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First thing I'd do is design the floor to be heated. That really cuts down on the heating bill in a large open space like that and it's a whole lot easier to do before building than it is to retrofit. I personally think it feels better but that's me. It does have the added benefit of not being any kind of fire hazard or source for unwanted dust movement and doesn't have a significant cost difference when you build it in initially.

Now that I've done my "green" duty, I'll get to tools.

You said you have access to most anything you need in your father's shop. My advice is take the top five most common tools you use there and buy them for your shop. Since you said you're planning on making furniture and cabinets, I would suspect the following (in the order I would expect them to be used most often):

1) Table saw
2) Router
3) Bandsaw
4) Miter saw/Radial Arm saw
5) Sanders (your preference of belt, drum, or disc)

After that I'd say (in no particular order)

Drill Press
Planer
Jointer
Scroll Saw
Lathe

Obviously you're going to want a good dust collection system, some good benches and might I recommend a set of steps for the loft area rather than just a ladder. I use the joists in my garage as storage area for my wood and it's a real pain in the neck to get up there with any significant piece of wood.
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post #14 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
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FrankP the floor is naturally heated I live in south Alabama, I wished I had that problem. What size router would be needed to make raised panel doors?
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post #15 of 17 Old 07-30-2008, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tripod58 View Post
...What size router would be needed to make raised panel doors?
I've done raised panels with 2hp (13 amp) without issue, but if you'll be doing them often a 3hp 15 amp) will have an easier time of it.
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post #16 of 17 Old 07-31-2008, 09:16 AM
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If you can swing it, a good router lift comes in handy, especially for the raised panels.

I use one like this: http://www.woodpeck.com/precisionrouterlift.html though I think mine is an earlier model.

Not a necessity, but a nicety.
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post #17 of 17 Old 07-31-2008, 11:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tripod58 View Post
All suggestions are welcome.
Hi Michael:

Here's my suggestion. When you get your dream shop planned out, and get a budge fixed, add 25%.

But, whatever you do, don't skimp, don't cut corners especially on the mechanical and electrical side of things....if you're like me, you plan on being in the hobby a long time.

I have a thread regarding the complete construction process of my new workshop which began in March. You can see it here:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3499

If you find something in there you wonder about, please feel free to PM me and we can chat.

regards,
smitty
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