Creating a simple box or sliding lid box! Complete newbie, please help! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 11-10-2018, 06:31 AM Thread Starter
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Question Creating a simple box or sliding lid box! Complete newbie, please help!

Hello, everyone! I am an avid wood enthusiast and still very new to to woodworking. I wanted to make a sliding lid box but fear my inexperience will force me to start with a hinged lid box. So here goes:

I want to make simple 3.5 in x 3.5 in x 6 (or 4x4x6) inch boxes to place some pottery I make in. I was thinking of practicing with cheap wood like pine or even plywood and veneer, but the endgoal is to make these from exotic wood from Purpleheart or Rosewood for really special pieces. Here is an elongated example: [Example 1] but more this size Picture and ultimately, I really want to do something like this, i want all examples, for my boxes to have sliding lids but this example has an acrylic lid with the logo etched on Example 3 I know it is a lot but presentation is a big factor for me. In the end, however, I think since I can't make sliding boxes without a tablesaw easily, I will just go with a hinged lid for now. When joining the sides together, are nails necessary if the glue is strong enough? I would rather not have nails show. Also, where is the best location online to buy metal hinges?

I currently only have a Ryobi cordless drill and kit that has different bits. I have been looking at getting a miter saw, router, jigsaw or circular handsaw but I don't know where to begin. I don't have much space but I feel I could find some if I was really dedicated. I think a tablesaw would be the most versatile thing I could get right now, there's a Ryobi one at Home Depot I could get for cheap and would allow me to cut the the blanks to piece instead of getting them cut at Wood Crafter. Would this tablesaw allow me to make rabbets for a sliding lid box?

Is there any place online that sells exotic woods at 1/4" x 3.5 or 4 x length? I can't go any higher because I don't think I could cut a 1/2" slab in half myself with the tablesaw. I think I will have to use a regular handsaw since I really don't have garage or outdoor space to setup right now.

Oh, lastly, I heard heat-treating purpleheart is a good way to bring out color, is this true? Can I do this with a torch? Also, what stain would be best on plywood or a good way to color it or non exotic woods purple?

I appreciate any and all feedback - thank you.

Last edited by Lucas Purpleheart; 11-10-2018 at 06:38 AM.
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post #2 of 14 Old 11-10-2018, 08:54 AM
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I admire your ambition, however .....

You can't build a race car with a screw driver and a toothbrush, just like you can't make many woodworking projects without a tablesaw. The smaller the project, the more a table saw is the easiest and safest way to make them. The harder the wood, the easier it is to make it with a tablesaw. So, am I getting my point across?

Cheap lightweight table saws are dangerous because they often don't have good fences, are too light weight and move about, and don't have enough room in front of the blade ... but for small projects that's OK. My first table saw was a Craftsman 10" with cast iron top and side extensions, but it was heavy. I didn't care at that time because I had a shop in my bedroom under my raised 4 poster bed. I was 18 yrs old and comfort wasn't high on my list.

Well, back to your questions. Table saws are dangerous for several reasons. The cheap ones are just inherently dangerous. Untrained operators combined with cheap table saws compound the problem.
A dull blade makes the saw more dangerous, but new blades are pretty inexpensive these days.

A sliding lid box will require a dado. Dados are hard to make by hand especially in a hard wood like purpleheart. Most beginner woodworkers use 3/4" thick material for everything even though it's too thick for small projects. That's because that can't saw it down into thinner pieces easily, without a table saw.... which is called "resawing". A bandsaw is the safest way to resaw wider pieces. A bandsaw was my second power tool back when I started out. I think I would look at getting a bandsaw to start with, even though I have made a strong case for getting a table saw. That issue can be debated however.

Gluing requires clamps or stretchable bands for small projects. The bands can be sections of large inner tubes from a truck tire or surgical tubing, or just large rubber bands for packages. A few clamps are still necessary, however.

I used dowels to make a small cabinet for my dad and those worked OK and were easy to drill and pound in after the pieces were held in place with small brads or finishing nails. Most wood glues with set up strong within an hour, but full strength takes 24 hours. Fast acting glues will work by adding moisture to make them set up.

Good luck with your endeavours.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-10-2018 at 10:51 AM.
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post #3 of 14 Old 11-10-2018, 01:20 PM
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Table saw gives very accurate smooth cuts, but a bandsaw is way more versatile and I do a lot of stuff on mine. I dont even have a tablesaw although its on my wish list.
Check the boxes on my signature link, all done with bandsaw and router table.
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post #4 of 14 Old 11-21-2018, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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Hello, everyone! Thank you for the response, I really appreciate it. I decided to go with a back miter saw and some clamps since I really don't have a workbench even yet. I cut an oak plan into sections and made a box with butt joints. I used shellac clear spray to finish it since I wasn't sure what stain would look good on it.

The image I have attached is the 2nd box I made and I want to make a purpleheart lid for it. I was thinking about making a door that opens outward like a castle or church door. Is this viable? I have High Performance Gloss to use on the purpleheart since I want to retain it's vibrant color, but one side is still a little brown so I have been trying to leave it in the sun to purple. Also, the sticker on one side made for a really dark imprint, so I am unsure of how to fix that.

The store employee told me to sand only up to 150 with my hand, instead of my orbital sander. Is this right? I am a little unsure of the process of sanding and finishing. Like I said, the woods are oak and purple and the finishes I have are Shellac clear spray and High Performance Gloss. Do I just sand the purpleheart to 150, use a wet?/dry? rag to brush of sawdust, then use my foam brush to apply 3 coats with a grace period of a couple hours in between? And for the oak, do I sand (with the grain) to 80, use rag to brush off sawdust, apply shellac, wait 20-30 minutes, sand to 150, rag, and apply shellac one last time? I think she said for the purpleheart, I can go as high as I want since I wasn't actually staining, or maybe it was the oak. Sorry I am unsure. How high should I sand these pieces and in what order should I apply the gloss/clear shellac pertaining to the process? Thank you all for your input. I plan to hopefully get a tablesaw that allows me do rabbets in the future since that seems like the most versatile tool I can have. A Circulaw saw would not let me get the strait cuts I want, without a guide, because I don't have a workbench really to work on so having a tablesaw would be a little easier. I think.

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post #5 of 14 Old 11-21-2018, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucas Purpleheart View Post



The image I have attached is the 2nd box I made and I want to make a purpleheart lid for it. I was thinking about making a door that opens outward like a castle or church door. Is this viable? I have High Performance Gloss to use on the purpleheart since I want to retain it's vibrant color, but one side is still a little brown so I have been trying to leave it in the sun to purple.



The store employee told me to sand only up to 150 with my hand, instead of my orbital sander. Is this right? I am a little unsure of the process of sanding and finishing. Like I said, the woods are oak and purple and the finishes I have are Shellac clear spray and High Performance Gloss. Do I just sand the purpleheart to 150, use a wet?/dry? rag to brush of sawdust, then use my foam brush to apply 3 coats with a grace period of a couple hours in between? And for the oak, do I sand (with the grain) to 80, use rag to brush off sawdust, apply shellac, wait 20-30 minutes, sand to 150, rag, and apply shellac one last time? I think she said for the purpleheart, I can go as high as I want since I wasn't actually staining, or maybe it was the oak. Sorry I am unsure. How high should I sand these pieces and in what order should I apply the gloss/clear shellac pertaining to the process?



https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/atta...368525&thumb=1

Hi Lucas, and congratulations on your interest in Woodworking. Yes, you can make a lid that opens like church doors, or any other kind of lid that you want.

As for sanding and finishing.... donít over think it, use a random orbital sander, Iím not sure why there would be a recommendation against it, I think everyone here would use a random orbital sander for initial sanding. Sand the oak to 150 or 180, usually no need to go beyond 220 with oak. Sand through your grits. If you are starting with 80, then use 150.

If you are staining, you donít want to sand beyond 220 grit or the sanded wood wonít allow the stain to soak in evenly. Hence the recommendation.

With the shellac, I canít give you a definitive answer without knowing the products you are working with. I donít usually think of shellac as having a flat or glossy finish like varnishes and polyurethane. In general, when using those products, you always use gloss for your initial coats, and if you want a flat or satin finish, you apply that as your top coats because the flattening agents tend to muddy the grain pattern of your wood.

Purpleheart browns with age and exposure to light. It will not darken in the sun, it will only fade the color to brown quicker.

As for construction. Your box has some problems. Iím telling you so you can learn from your mistakes. When you construct the four sides of you box, the wood direction on all four sides must run the same direction since the wood is going to move with humidity changes. The boards wonít change in length, only width. Typically, a box is made with the grain running around the box so the box can grow evenly and imperceptibly in height with the seasons. By having some of your boards running one way, and some the other, it will cause problems with your glue joints as some boards will change in height, others in width. The opposing movement will want to break the joints apart.

As for the bottom, it too will grow and eventually force apart the bottom of your box. The simplest thing to do is use plywood for the bottom since it wonít move with humidity changes. If you want to use solid wood for the bottom, you will need to either attach it the bottom attached with nails, or have the bottom captured and free moving by use of a dado or groove that allows space for the board to move with humidity changes. This is how frame and panel doors are made for cabinets.



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post #6 of 14 Old 12-15-2018, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Hi Lucas, and congratulations on your interest in Woodworking. Yes, you can make a lid that opens like church doors, or any other kind of lid that you want.

As for sanding and finishing.... donít over think it, use a random orbital sander, Iím not sure why there would be a recommendation against it, I think everyone here would use a random orbital sander for initial sanding. Sand the oak to 150 or 180, usually no need to go beyond 220 with oak. Sand through your grits. If you are starting with 80, then use 150.

If you are staining, you donít want to sand beyond 220 grit or the sanded wood wonít allow the stain to soak in evenly. Hence the recommendation.

With the shellac, I canít give you a definitive answer without knowing the products you are working with. I donít usually think of shellac as having a flat or glossy finish like varnishes and polyurethane. In general, when using those products, you always use gloss for your initial coats, and if you want a flat or satin finish, you apply that as your top coats because the flattening agents tend to muddy the grain pattern of your wood.

Purpleheart browns with age and exposure to light. It will not darken in the sun, it will only fade the color to brown quicker.

As for construction. Your box has some problems. Iím telling you so you can learn from your mistakes. When you construct the four sides of you box, the wood direction on all four sides must run the same direction since the wood is going to move with humidity changes. The boards wonít change in length, only width. Typically, a box is made with the grain running around the box so the box can grow evenly and imperceptibly in height with the seasons. By having some of your boards running one way, and some the other, it will cause problems with your glue joints as some boards will change in height, others in width. The opposing movement will want to break the joints apart.

As for the bottom, it too will grow and eventually force apart the bottom of your box. The simplest thing to do is use plywood for the bottom since it wonít move with humidity changes. If you want to use solid wood for the bottom, you will need to either attach it the bottom attached with nails, or have the bottom captured and free moving by use of a dado or groove that allows space for the board to move with humidity changes. This is how frame and panel doors are made for cabinets.



In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Hey Terry, I want to thank you for the insightful and lengthy response, I truly appreciate you taking the time to help me hone my craft. Here is a picture of the two topcoats I have. Since I am not staining either the oak box or purpleheart lid of the box, I can go up to 220? Would you even recommend it?

My thought process is this:
  • Oak: [Already Sanded to 80] > Clean Dust > Apply Shellac > wait > Sand to 150 > Clean Dust > Shellac & Wait (No need to sand to 220 as you said)
  • Purpleheart: Sand to 80 > Remove Dust > Apply Gloss > Wait 2-4 hours ideally but with cold weather 4-5? > Sand to 150 > Remove Dust > Apply 2nd Gloss > Wait hours > Sand to 220 > Remove Dust > Apply final layer of Gloss, more if needed, but with no sanding in between layers.

So, is this process right? Sorry for being meticulous, I just want to make sure I do this right. Also, what do you mean by, "Sand through your grits" I know I have to sand along the grain, but with an orbital sander, do I just sand in a circular motion clockwise in the direction of the grain? But this doesn't make sense because half the motion, I am sanding across the grain. So, do I take the sander, sand a line along the grain and pick it up and do another stroke along the grain?

Also, I was reading on another site, that the way to remove dust sensibly is by a tack rag, vacuum or cloth rag soaked in mineral spirits, which is a water-based technique. They say:
Quote:
Angela, like a number of the other comments I use vacuum and a cloth/paper dampened with mineral spirits to remove sanding dust prior to applying finishes and after sanding between coats. I would tend to avoid using cloth dampened with water since contact with water will raise the grain.

The only time I will intentionally raise the grain is when I am going to apply a water base stain/dye or finish. Then, to get a smooth finish it is necessary to raise the grain prior to application of the water base product.
So, since my gloss is water-based, should I raise the grain with a rag and mineral spirits to clean the dust off between sanding instead of a tack rag?

Lastly, is my box going to be fine in the long run or should I remake the bottom? The only tools I have are a cordless drill, back saw and I recently just got a miter saw from harbor freight. Once again, I truly appreciate your help - thank you.
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post #7 of 14 Old 12-18-2018, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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thank's for taking the time to reply, Terry, I really appreciate it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q
As for sanding and finishing.... don’t over think it, use a random orbital sander, I’m not sure why there would be a recommendation against it, I think everyone here would use a random orbital sander for initial sanding. Sand the oak to 150 or 180, usually no need to go beyond 220 with oak. Sand through your grits. If you are starting with 80, then use 150.
So should I wipe the dust off in between each coat with a tack rag? And with the gloss, should I use a rag soaked in mineral spirits?

Also, are you suggesting putting the shellac on the purpleheart? Because the employee at Woodcrafters warned me against doing so, claiming it would warm the color too much and darken it - I believe. So they suggested a water-based finish like the Gloss.


So it'd be: Sand > dust > finish > wait and repeat at least twice more?

And for the shellac, i wait 20ish minutes, while the PH takes about 2-4 hours, ideally, for the finish to dry and allow me to resand the next level up. However, since it's winter, I should wait even longer; perhaps, up to 6 hours?


Quote:
If you are staining, you don’t want to sand beyond 220 grit or the sanded wood won’t allow the stain to soak in evenly. Hence the recommendation.

With the shellac, I can’t give you a definitive answer without knowing the products you are working with. I don’t usually think of shellac as having a flat or glossy finish like varnishes and polyurethane. In general, when using those products, you always use gloss for your initial coats, and if you want a flat or satin finish, you apply that as your top coats because the flattening agents tend to muddy the grain pattern of your wood.
Attached to this post are the products I am using.

Quote:
Purpleheart browns with age and exposure to light. It will not darken in the sun, it will only fade the color to brown quicker.
Is there any way to seal the purple in? I've let my board sit in sunlight for about a week now and it seems the same. There's still a dark spot over where I peeled off the sticker as well.

Quote:
As for construction. Your box has some problems. I’m telling you so you can learn from your mistakes. When you construct the four sides of you box, the wood direction on all four sides must run the same direction since the wood is going to move with humidity changes. The boards won’t change in length, only width. Typically, a box is made with the grain running around the box so the box can grow evenly and imperceptibly in height with the seasons. By having some of your boards running one way, and some the other, it will cause problems with your glue joints as some boards will change in height, others in width. The opposing movement will want to break the joints apart.
Yes, the woodcrafter employee alerted me of this when I brought my box in for them to inspect. Will this be problematic to the point where I should rebuild the bottom panel? Or should I let it just be?

Quote:
As for the bottom, it too will grow and eventually force apart the bottom of your box. The simplest thing to do is use plywood for the bottom since it won’t move with humidity changes. If you want to use solid wood for the bottom, you will need to either attach it the bottom attached with nails, or have the bottom captured and free moving by use of a dado or groove that allows space for the board to move with humidity changes. This is how frame and panel doors are made for cabinets.
The 3-panel bottom? It will spread apart and push the sides out? This is 1/8" oak wood for the box. Wouldn't plywood look off? And I don't have a table saw so I cannot make dado or grooves right now. I only have a sliding miter saw from harbor freight which was just gifted to me. Are you suggesting I acquire an 18g nail-gun to supplement the glued joints? I personally don't like the look of metal nails on a wooden box.


Anyways, my biggest issue right now if finishing up the box, so I just need to make sure I get the process right for the oak and PH. someone said that they would pre-raise the grain using mineral spirits soaked onto a (tack?) rag while cleaning off dust between sanding, is this correct? And so, to clean off the oak, I should use air (for the PH, too?), a regular tack rag and maybe more? I am not sure. I really want to nail this finish on this box so I can learn and become a better woodworker. In my signature, I have attached a list of my tools and their specs if you click their links.

Lastly, I was browsing the forum for how others have finished PH and I have read: lacquer, ARMOR ALL CLEAR COAT WOOD PRESERVATIVE, Tung oil, and Helmsmanģ Spar Urethane, which has UV blockers to prevent sun-damage, which is what I am assuming Armor All utilizes. Does the High Performance Gloss can I have do this as well? I cannot tell. But which of these options would be best for PH?
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Woodworking projects I am working on: Box 2
Woodworking projects To Do: Box 3, Computer Side Desk, Brand Logo, Canopy Corner Frame
Woodworking projects Finished: Box 1

Tools I have: Ryobi 12V Drill, Ryobi 5" Random Orbital Sander, Chicago Electric Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Husky 14" Miter Back Saw

Last edited by Lucas Purpleheart; 12-18-2018 at 01:12 AM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 12-18-2018, 02:17 AM
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your wood working start reminds of me of my self 1.5 years ago. But I probably made way more mistakes than you with tools and finishes.

- My recipe now is to use a miter saw and I can get almost most cuts and angles. It's alot planning and creativity but fun.
- To round edges, I use a ROS sander and work it, work it, work it.
- to join boards, I use a countersink and wood plugs. I just found it more accurate, easier than other methods, and the plugs add character. see walnut pics

Here is a 1 year old padauk shelf with shellac, once bright beautiful red, now turning brown. That purpleheart may go through similar.
- If I had to redo this, I would just do what I did with my monkeypod table. I took no chances and used Man O War Marine Spar Varnish, and so far the color is still vibrant.
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Creating a simple box or sliding lid box! Complete newbie, please help!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucas Purpleheart View Post
thank's for taking the time to reply, Terry, I really appreciate it.



So should I wipe the dust off in between each coat with a tack rag? And with the gloss, should I use a rag soaked in mineral spirits?

* You should always vacuum, or blow, or tach between grits because courser grits will break off and interfere with the next finer grit and leave unintended deep scratches.

Also, are you suggesting putting the shellac on the purpleheart? Because the employee at Woodcrafters warned me against doing so, claiming it would warm the color too much and darken it - I believe. So they suggested a water-based finish like the Gloss.

* The shellac you have is a wood sealer that is not needed for your project. It is usually used on woods that tend to look blotchy like pine and maple. Wonít be of any benefit on the oak and purpleheart.

So it'd be: Sand > dust > finish > wait and repeat at least twice more?

* Sand 80 grit, 120 grit, 180 grit or 100, 150 and 220 depending on what you are starting with. There is no advantage to sand above that on the oak because of the open pores. The purpleheart is dense and will look better sanding with finer grits. There is no reason to wait between sanding.

* Once you apply a coat of the varnish you should wait for it to dry and sand it lightly by hand using the last grit you used in the initial sanding. The goal here is to remove the roughness caused by the raising of the wood fibers caused by the varnish and no more. Use your tach cloth.

* After applying additional coats of varnish and building up a finish (it will take forever to build a smooth finish on the oak unless you start by filling the pores) you can lightly sand by hand using progressively finer grits to build the shine. It will look real nice on the purpleheart.

And for the shellac, i wait 20ish minutes, while the PH takes about 2-4 hours, ideally, for the finish to dry and allow me to resand the next level up. However, since it's winter, I should wait even longer; perhaps, up to 6 hours?

* Donít use it. If you were to use it on a different project your schedule would be sound.


Attached to this post are the products I am using.


Is there any way to seal the purple in? I've let my board sit in sunlight for about a week now and it seems the same. There's still a dark spot over where I peeled off the sticker as well.

* There is no way to keep the purpleheart from eventually turning brown. The varnish will slow it as will keeping it out of direct sunlight. If you had someone who could plane a tiny bit off you could restore its color, but it will eventually go brown.

Yes, the woodcrafter employee alerted me of this when I brought my box in for them to inspect. Will this be problematic to the point where I should rebuild the bottom panel? Or should I let it just be?

* If you arenít going to fix the sides there is no reason to fix the bottom. If it glued together you wonít be able to get it apart without ruining it.

The 3-panel bottom? It will spread apart and push the sides out? This is 1/8" oak wood for the box. Wouldn't plywood look off? And I don't have a table saw so I cannot make dado or grooves right now. I only have a sliding miter saw from harbor freight which was just gifted to me. Are you suggesting I acquire an 18g nail-gun to supplement the glued joints? I personally don't like the look of metal nails on a wooden box.

* Without having someway to put grooves in the bottom you would have to attach the bottom to the bottom of the box. If you use 1/8 or 1/4 plywood it wonít be nearly as noticeable as 3/4 inch thick solid wood. The solid wood would have to be nailed to the bottom with small brads because the brads allow for some wood movement, gluing would ruin your box. The plywood wonít move so you can glue it to the bottom without fear of damage to the box. Without having someway to cut a rabbet on the inside edge of the box bottom the plywood will show unless you cover it with molding. Plywood on the inside isnít a problem because it gets covered with stuff. Some use flocking to hide the inside wood.

Anyways, my biggest issue right now if finishing up the box, so I just need to make sure I get the process right for the oak and PH. someone said that they would pre-raise the grain using mineral spirits soaked onto a (tack?) rag while cleaning off dust between sanding, is this correct? And so, to clean off the oak, I should use air (for the PH, too?), a regular tack rag and maybe more? I am not sure. I really want to nail this finish on this box so I can learn and become a better woodworker. In my signature, I have attached a list of my tools and their specs if you click their links.

Lastly, I was browsing the forum for how others have finished PH and I have read: lacquer, ARMOR ALL CLEAR COAT WOOD PRESERVATIVE, Tung oil, and Helmsman Spar Urethane, which has UV blockers to prevent sun-damage, which is what I am assuming Armor All utilizes. Does the High Performance Gloss can I have do this as well? I cannot tell. But which of these options would be best for PH?

Sorry about the difficulty reading the above, didnít know how to quote parts of it. I * Ďd my responses instead.



In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.

Last edited by Terry Q; 12-18-2018 at 02:43 AM.
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post #10 of 14 Old 12-18-2018, 07:03 AM
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Hey Terry, I want to thank you for the insightful and lengthy response, I truly appreciate you taking the time to help me hone my craft. Here is a picture of the two topcoats I have. Since I am not staining either the oak box or purpleheart lid of the box, I can go up to 220? Would you even recommend it?

My thought process is this:
  • Oak: [Already Sanded to 80] > Clean Dust > Apply Shellac > wait > Sand to 150 > Clean Dust > Shellac & Wait (No need to sand to 220 as you said)
  • Purpleheart: Sand to 80 > Remove Dust > Apply Gloss > Wait 2-4 hours ideally but with cold weather 4-5? > Sand to 150 > Remove Dust > Apply 2nd Gloss > Wait hours > Sand to 220 > Remove Dust > Apply final layer of Gloss, more if needed, but with no sanding in between layers.

So, is this process right? Sorry for being meticulous, I just want to make sure I do this right. Also, what do you mean by, "Sand through your grits" I know I have to sand along the grain, but with an orbital sander, do I just sand in a circular motion clockwise in the direction of the grain? But this doesn't make sense because half the motion, I am sanding across the grain. So, do I take the sander, sand a line along the grain and pick it up and do another stroke along the grain?

Also, I was reading on another site, that the way to remove dust sensibly is by a tack rag, vacuum or cloth rag soaked in mineral spirits, which is a water-based technique. They say:


So, since my gloss is water-based, should I raise the grain with a rag and mineral spirits to clean the dust off between sanding instead of a tack rag?

Lastly, is my box going to be fine in the long run or should I remake the bottom? The only tools I have are a cordless drill, back saw and I recently just got a miter saw from harbor freight. Once again, I truly appreciate your help - thank you.
Having internet problems so can't read entire thread. The shellac is incompatible with the finish you are using. If using shellac as a sealer it should be Sealcoat.
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post #11 of 14 Old 12-19-2018, 09:19 AM
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I am making various purpleheart turnings for holiday gifts and would like to hear what works for others to bring out the purple color before finishing. I am making mostly pens, but other small gift items, too.

So far, my best approach has been to leave the unfinished turnings for a few days in the "outside room" which has a lot of windows and skylights. I am afraid to expose them to direct sunlight. I have read about people who put it in the oven or heat it with a torch, but it seems risky and difficult to control.

-> What do YOU do to "activate" purpleheart wood to bring out the brightest purple color before finishing?
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post #12 of 14 Old 12-29-2018, 03:48 PM Thread Starter
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For the PH lid it'd be: rub with mineral spirit to pre-raise grain, Sand to 80, tack cloth, layer of gloss finish, wait drying time then redo the whole process again for more layers? So sand to 150 and finally 220 last.

Woodworking projects I am working on: Box 2
Woodworking projects To Do: Box 3, Computer Side Desk, Brand Logo, Canopy Corner Frame
Woodworking projects Finished: Box 1

Tools I have: Ryobi 12V Drill, Ryobi 5" Random Orbital Sander, Chicago Electric Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Husky 14" Miter Back Saw
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post #13 of 14 Old 12-29-2018, 05:36 PM
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If you can find a good supplier in your area, there should be no need to bring out the purple because it should already be there. And when you cut and samd a good quality, it should be a nice purple already.

Over time, exposed to air and light, purpleheart will get very dark. The same goes for padouk. It starts out pretty brightly colored and settles into a beautiful reddish brown.

Purpleheart is very difficult to work with because it is very hard. It does not sand well at all. Padouk on the other hand, is also a hardwood but easily sands and cuts.

Also want to thank you for bringing to my attention that there is more than one kind of hookah. Anywhere from pot shops to street corners.

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Denison, Tx
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post #14 of 14 Old 12-29-2018, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
If you can find a good supplier in your area, there should be no need to bring out the purple because it should already be there. And when you cut and samd a good quality, it should be a nice purple already.

Over time, exposed to air and light, purpleheart will get very dark. The same goes for padouk. It starts out pretty brightly colored and settles into a beautiful reddish brown.

Purpleheart is very difficult to work with because it is very hard. It does not sand well at all. Padouk on the other hand, is also a hardwood but easily sands and cuts.

Also want to thank you for bringing to my attention that there is more than one kind of hookah. Anywhere from pot shops to street corners.
Here are two new finishes I just got. Yes the varathane satin and the stain for the oak.

And, of course, I don't even recall mentioning hookah but I do make ceramic hookah bowls which are what will house these boxes once I complete them. There are many facets to hookah than what we know from India/Persia/Egypt/etc
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Woodworking projects I am working on: Box 2
Woodworking projects To Do: Box 3, Computer Side Desk, Brand Logo, Canopy Corner Frame
Woodworking projects Finished: Box 1

Tools I have: Ryobi 12V Drill, Ryobi 5" Random Orbital Sander, Chicago Electric Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Husky 14" Miter Back Saw
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