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post #1 of 10 Old 09-15-2009, 08:48 PM Thread Starter
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Best Sawhorse design

Hello Everyone,

Being as anal as I am, I have been thinking about somethings, basic things.. and How I do them as to compared to others. One thing that has popped in my mind is that I use a folding table and put a large sheet of foam on a table and then clamp plywood and the styrofoam to the table.. then I use my circular saw guide I made to rip it... Anyways.. I think I do this cause my sawhorse design sucks. I have sawhorses that are just pieces of 2x4 in those metal brackets, they fold.. I'm sure everyone know what I am talking about. I'm thinking with sawhorses that I could clamp the sheet of plywood to, i could be cutting up sheets of plywood with less setup time, etc.

So, without further blabbing.. What design of sawhorses do you guys use?? I am thinking I'll end up making them. I also am thinking ones that I can replace the tops of or.. that I can double stick tape scrap to the top of..

this design caught my eye..
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/SawHorse/

THanks
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post #2 of 10 Old 09-16-2009, 06:31 AM
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I have three or four different saw horse designs. A couple stay stored away in a shed until I need them for a larger project. One shorter (not tall) set has a piece of plywood screded to the top and is kept permanently this way as a small portable table.

The set that I use the most is a light weight Sears special made of plastic. I modified them with a 1"x 4" board permanently screwed to the top. They are easy to store, sufficiently stable and easy to move around.

In the end, the best desgin for a sawhorse depends upon what you are going to do it.

George
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post #3 of 10 Old 09-16-2009, 07:43 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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I agree with George

My favorite saw horse is a Fat Max by Stanley, light weight, folding, adjustable height legs, locking shelf for rigidity, two notches crosswise for 2x stock to support the length of plywood or a hollow core or solid door and about $30.00 or so each at HD. I have metal bracket ones, homemade all wood ones, all steel ones, but the Stanleys are the best. There are other folding plastic work tables that have clamping jaws that are very handy for site work when you need a vise of sorts as well. Mix and match maybe, but I always buy in pairs however. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 10 Old 09-16-2009, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback. I expected people to have pics of ones they made.. I mainly need them to hold plywood while I cut it down to smaller pieces .
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post #5 of 10 Old 09-16-2009, 09:48 PM
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Brad,
I use the plastic sawhorses also. When I go to cut up full sheets of plywood, I put a couple of 8' 2 x 4's across the horses (perpendicular to) and lay the plywood on top of them. I set my saw so it cuts through the plywood and about a 1/4" into the 2 x 4's . When I am done, I save the 2 x 4's for the next cutting session, fold up the horses, set em aside. Very simple, works well and doesn't take up much space. Just make sure you get the better plastic horses, don't buy the real cheapy ones. Mine have the shelf below that comes in handy also.
Mike Hawkins
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post #6 of 10 Old 09-17-2009, 08:33 AM Thread Starter
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I think Mike hit the nail on the head... Get good plastic ones. The homedepot near my house, always has ones that are clunky and junky.. That's probably why I am turned off from them.. I'll have to keep an eye out..
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post #7 of 10 Old 09-17-2009, 11:15 AM
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I saw a Tool Crib issue recently that listed 26 or so sawhorse designs. I'm particular to designs that collapse or fold, since I'm anal about clutter.
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post #8 of 10 Old 09-17-2009, 04:53 PM Thread Starter
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I think this is the list you are talking about

http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2008/07...mate-sawhorse/

Good list. I am leaning towards something grid like.. to make it easier to keep a sheet of plywood down and from slipping when trying to cut.
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-22-2010, 09:30 AM
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I know this is an old post, but who couldn't use another look at "Best Sawhorse Design"?

I made a set that fold up out of the way super easy and unfold just as easy. They can be made almost entirely out of one sheet of plywood and are very strong. I work construction and have a set that stays with the company and they have been going strong for over 6 months now. We pull an enclosed trailer and space is defnately limited in there so these work great. I also have a set in my shop.





They really work nicely and I have made a video on how to make them yourself, they are pretty easy really and can be done in an afternoon with no problem.

If your interested, you can check out my blog, The Woodworking Trip, where I have the video posted and info that will help with the building proccess. I hope someone finds these useful.

By the way, I am not a spammer or someone trying to sell a product to make a buck. Just a woodworker who thinks other people would find this design to be just what they are looking for to make their work easier.

Check out my blog about my woodworking experiences and my shop, The Woodworking Trip.
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post #10 of 10 Old 05-21-2011, 04:04 PM
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Again with addition to an old thread, but what the hey!

I went looking for a sturdy knockdown sawhorse and didn't find a design that I liked. So it was off to Google Sketchup!

Here's the build in sketchup...
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehou...415e2f&ct=mdsa
Top rail length is 4' so just scale it and take measurements from there on.

About 25 bucks material for the pair, easy to build, two bolt knockdown, very sturdy, relatively lightweight.



The 2X10 provides a decent amount of angular anchoring for the saddle of the legs. The 3/8 bottom bolt remains in place and the top one is removed for take down and storage. Slighty more expensive than an all 2X4 design, but many times sturdier. A 2 X 10 X 8' prime board at Menards is about six bucks (there's always a prime grade single board to be found in the "construction grade" stack if you search a bit). Four 2 X 6 X 8' or 2 X 6 X 6' boards another 15 bucks or so. Most of us have the 2 X 4 just laying about for the top rail. Four 3/8 X 12" zinc plated carriage bolts ought to be another six to eight bucks, unless you can find a length of threaded rod cheaper yet. If you recessed the hole just a tad, one 36inch rod would be just sufficient for all four bolts.

Top rail is 2 X 4 X 4'. Legs are 2 X 6. Total height is approx 31". Longitudinal stance of leg is 10 degrees from vert. Transverse stance of leg is 20 degrees from vert.
Bolts are 3/8 X 12" carriage type trimmed to fit. Wing nut on the top one would make it that much easier to dis/assemble.

Last edited by frascati; 05-22-2011 at 07:50 PM.
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